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Vote Hemp Press Release: North Dakota Farmers File Lawsuit Against DEA to Grow Industrial Hemp

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, June 18, 2007 CONTACT: Adam Eidinger, T: 202-744-2671 or E: [email protected], or Tom Murphy, T: 207-542-4998, E: [email protected] North Dakota Farmers File Lawsuit Against DEA to Grow Industrial Hemp Plaintiffs Seek Federal Recognition of State-Issued Hemp Farming Licenses BISMARCK, ND – Two North Dakota farmers filed a lawsuit today in U.S. District Court for the District of North Dakota in an effort to end the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) obstruction of commercial hemp farming in the United States. If successful, the legal action would result in licensed hemp farmers receiving assurances that no federal agency could hold them criminally liable under the Controlled Substances Act. Vote Hemp’s grassroots supporters are funding the legal action. A copy of the complaint is available online at: http://www.votehemp.com/legal_cases_ND.html. The farmers – State Rep. David Monson from Osnabrock and Wayne Hauge from Ray – were issued their state licenses to grow industrial hemp from North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson in February 2007. At that time the farmers applied for a DEA permit to grow industrial hemp and import live seed. Over the next few months, however, the agency’s inaction on the applications fueled frustration in North Dakota’s legislature. When lawmakers concluded that DEA had no intention of working cooperatively with the state’s first-in-the-nation hemp farming rules, the North Dakota legislature voted overwhelmingly to drop the DEA licensing requirement from the statute. “I applied for my North Dakota state license in January and was hopeful that DEA would act quickly and affirm my right to plant industrial hemp this year. Unfortunately, DEA has not responded in any way other than to state that it would take them a lot more time than the window of time I have to import seed and plant the crop,” said Rep. David Monson, who is the Assistant Majority (Republican) Leader. “It appears that DEA really doesn’t want to work with anyone to resolve the issue,” Monson added. One of the central arguments in the litigation is that industrial hemp is defined to be those varieties of Cannabis that have no drug value and are cultivated exclusively for fiber and seed. Although useless as a drug crop, industrial hemp plants are distinct varieties of Cannabis sativa L., the same species from which marijuana varieties come. DEA considers industrial hemp plants to be “marihuana,” a controlled substance under Schedule I of the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA), 21 U.S.C. §§ 801 et seq., the possession or production of which is subject to severe criminal penalties under that law, including property forfeiture. “We are asking that DEA to do nothing, exactly what they have done for ten years,” says Tim Purdon one of the attorneys working for Monson and Hauge. “North Dakota’s rules no longer require a DEA permit so we are basically asking the court to tell DEA to leave our farmers alone.” The express language of the CSA has specifically provided that hemp fiber, seed oil and seed incapable of germination are exempt from the definition of “marihuana” and are thus not controlled substances under that law. By virtue of this exemption, it is currently lawful under federal law – and has been for almost 70 years – to import into the U.S., sell within the U.S., and make and sell products made from, the excluded parts of the Cannabis plant (i.e., hemp fiber, stalk, seed oil and seed incapable of germination). The farmers seek a declaration that the CSA does not apply to the industrial hemp plants they seek to cultivate pursuant to state law because: (1) only hemp fiber, stalk, sterilized seed and seed oil, items expressly exempted from the CSA, will enter the marketplace; and (2) the industrial hemp to be grown will be useless as a drug crop due to North Dakota legal requirements for extremely low THC levels. Further, to the extent the DEA attempts to argue that, despite these facts, the CSA does apply to hemp farming under North Dakota law, this would be an unconstitutional federal restraint on commerce occurring purely within the borders of North Dakota. “I want to grow hemp because it will fill a niche market in numerous areas,” says fourth generation farmer and certified public accountant Wayne Hauge. “In recent years there has been strong growth in demand for hemp seeds in the U.S., but the American farmer is being left out while Canadian, European and Chinese farmers are filling the void created by our outdated federal policy.” Last year, just over 48,000 acres of hemp were grown in Canada, primarily in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, provinces that border North Dakota. Hemp farmers in Canada averaged $250 CDN per acre in profit in 2006, according to the Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance, an association of businesses, farmers and researchers. Hemp is a good rotational crop with the ability to reduce weeds in future cereal crops. Very few chemicals, if any, are required to grow the crop which is considered a good alternative to those with harmful environmental impacts such as cotton, tobacco and soy. In the largest hemp producing country, China, which grows 2 million acres, hemp hurds are processed into lightweight boards, and hemp fibers, already used in the paper and automotive industries, are finding new uses as reinforcement in plastics for products such as window frames and floor coverings. (In fact, some of these innovative products will be used on a large scale at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, according to news reports.) In Sweden, companies including IKEA, Volvo and Saab have shown interest in hemp fibers and hurds for use in vehicle interiors and furniture. In the UK, Germany and the Netherlands, considerable investments are being made to develop utilize hemp fiber in composites which are used to manufacture auto parts for BMW, Chrysler and Mercedes. In Canada, Germany and Japan, businesses are investigating reinforcing Polylactide (PLA) plastic with hemp fibers in order to widen the technology’s field of applications. # # # Vote Hemp is a national, single-issue, non-profit organization dedicated to the acceptance of and a free market for low-THC industrial hemp and to changes in current law to allow U.S. farmers to once again grow the crop. More information about hemp legislation and the crop's many uses may be found at www.VoteHemp.com or www.HempIndustries.org. BETA SP or DVD Video News Releases featuring footage of hemp farming in other countries are available upon request by contacting Adam Eidinger at 202-744-2671.
Location: 
Bismarck, ND
United States

A New Suit By Farmers Against the DEA Illustrates Why The War on Drugs Should Not Include a War on Hemp

Location: 
ND
United States
Publication/Source: 
FindLaw (CA)
URL: 
http://writ.news.findlaw.com/commentary/20070619_colburn.html

North Dakota Farmers File Lawsuit Against DEA Over Hemp Ban

This afternoon, I particpated in a tele-news conference held in Bismarck, North Dakota, to announce the filing of a federal lawsuit by two North Dakota farmers (including a Republican state representative!) against the DEA for its refusal to issue permits allowing them to grow hemp. North Dakota has passed state legislation permitting hemp growing under strict regulations, and its hemp-friendly Agriculture Commissioner, Roger Johnson, has promulgated the necessary guidelines. Johnson issued state permits to the two farmers months ago and sought DEA approval, but DEA did nothing. Now, the farmers are suing. This case could be a big one, once and for all getting the DEA out of the way of commercial hemp farming. I'll be writing about this in a feature article this week, but in the meantime, you can check out VoteHemp's North Dakota information page here for more detailed info on the case. Too bad somebody has to sue the DEA to get it to uphold the Controlled Substance Act, which specifically exempts hemp from the marijuana prohibition.
Location: 
United States

Hemp: California Bill Passes Assembly

A bill that would allow California farmers to grow non-psychoactive hemp passed the Assembly May 10 and now heads to the state Senate, where it is also expected to pass. A similar bill passed the legislature last year, only to be vetoed by Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Authored by Assemblyman Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) and Assemblyman Chuck DeVore (R-Irvine), AB 684 would pave the way for California farmers to eventually -- not immediately -- grow the plant, which is used to make food, clothing, paper, body care, bio-fuel, and auto products. If the bill were to be signed into law, industry organizations like Vote Hemp and the Hemp Industries Association, as well as the California Certified Organic Farmers, have vowed to challenge the federal ban on hemp planting.

Schwarzenegger cited the federal ban when he vetoed last year's hemp bill. He claimed it would put farmers in jeopardy of federal prosecution. But proponents of this year's bill are hopeful the governor will relent.

"Passage of the hemp farming bill in the Assembly is a sign it is likely to reach Governor Schwarzenegger's desk for the second year in row," said Vote Hemp legal counsel and San Francisco Attorney Patrick Goggin. "The mood in Sacramento is this bill is consistent with California's effort to be leader on US environmental policy. Hemp is a versatile plant that can replace polluting crops such as cotton and is taking off as an organic food and body care ingredient. It is time to jump into the expanding market for hemp that California companies currently import from Canada and elsewhere."

American hemp product manufacturers currently have to import their raw material from China, Canada, or one of the more than 30 other countries that allow hemp production. It is the only crop that is illegal to grow in the US, but legal to import.

California Assembly Passes Hemp Farming Legislation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday May 10, 2007 CONTACT: Adam Eidinger Ph: 202-744-2671, E: [email protected] or Tom Murphy Ph: 207-542-4998, E: [email protected] California Assembly Passes Hemp Farming Legislation AB 684 Would Allow Farmers to Grow Non-Drug Varieties of Cannabis SACRAMENTO, CA – California’s Assembly today voted 41 to 29, with 9 not voting, to approve AB 684, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2007. The legislation gives farmers the right to grow non-psychoactive Industrial Hemp which is commonly made into everything from food, clothing, paper, body care, bio-fuel and even auto parts. The bill now goes to the Senate where it is expected to have enough support to pass. The text of legislation can be found at: http://www.votehemp.com/state/california.html#Legislation. AB 684, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act, was authored by Assemblyman Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) and Assemblyman Chuck DeVore (R-Irvine). This is the second time in two years that a bipartisan hemp farming bill has passed the Assembly. Last year, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed AB 1147 which is nearly identical to AB 864. At that time the Governor claimed that bill would put farmers in jeopardy of federal prosecution if they grew hemp despite assurances by Vote Hemp and other supporting organizations such as the California based Hemp Industries Association and California Certified Organic Farmers there would be a challenge to the Drug Enforcement Administration’s legal authority to interfere with the state hemp farming law prior to implementation. “Passage of the hemp farming bill in the Assembly is a sign it is likely to reach Governor Schwarzenegger’s desk for the second year in row,” says Vote Hemp legal Council and San Francisco Attorney Patrick Goggin. “The mood in Sacramento is this bill is consistent with California’s effort to be leader on US environmental policy. Hemp is a versatile plant that can replace polluting crops such as cotton and is taking off as an organic food and body care ingredient. It is time to jump into the expanding market for hemp that California companies currently import from Canada and elsewhere.” Today more than 30 industrialized nations grow industrial hemp and export to the US. It is the only crop that is both illegal to grow and legal for Americans to import. Sales of hemp food and body care products have grown rapidly in recent years fueling an expansion of hemp farming in Canada which topped 48,000 acres in 2006. A telephone poll with a 3.5% margin of error of likely California voters taken from February 22 – 26 showed a total of 71% support changing state law to allow farmers to grow hemp. The survey was conducted by the respected research firm Zogby International on behalf of Vote Hemp and five manufacturers of hemp food products including Alpsnack®, French Meadow Bakery®, Living Harvest®, Nature’s Path Organic Foods® and Nutiva®. Poll questions and results regarding industrial hemp farming policy and consumer attitudes on hemp products and nutrition can be viewed online at: http://www.votehemp.com/polls.html. There is evidence of strong support among men and women and self-identified liberal and conservative voters on the issue. Among California Republicans, 60% support changing state law on hemp while 74% of Democrats are in support. Support was also steady among all age groups, ranging from 54% of 18 to 29 year olds to 82% of 30 to 49 year olds, 74% of 50 to 64 years olds and 60% of those over 65 years old. # # More information about hemp legislation and the crop’s many uses can be found at www.VoteHemp.com.
Location: 
Sacramento, CA
United States

State Assembly approves hemp farming bill

Location: 
Sacramento, CA
United States
Publication/Source: 
The Napa Valley Register (CA)
URL: 
http://www.napavalleyregister.com/articles/2007/05/11/news/national/doc464403f1d635a764646808.txt

Vote Hemp Press Release - North Dakota to DEA: Out of Our Hemp Fields

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, April 30, 200& CONTACT: Adam Eidinger Tel: 202-744-2671, E: [email protected] or Tom Murphy Tel: 207-542-4998, E: [email protected] North Dakota to DEA: Out of Our Hemp Fields New Law Allows Hemp Farming Without DEA License, Farmers to Challenge DEA BISMARCK, ND - North Dakota’s legislature wrapped up last week by telling the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration that it would no longer require state-licensed industrial hemp farmers to seek DEA licenses. The law change removes the DEA license as a requirement of state law, but it can't protect farmers from federal prosecution. Vote Hemp, the nation's leading industrial hemp advocacy group, will support a lawsuit brought by ND-licensed hemp farmers to prevent the DEA from enforcing federal marijuana laws against them. If the farmers' lawsuit, which will be filed in the coming weeks, is successful, states across the nation will be free to implement hemp farming laws without fear of federal interference. “With the broad authority that has been granted to them by Congress, the DEA could have easily approved the applications of the farmers in North Dakota,” says Tom Murphy, National Outreach Coordinator for Vote Hemp. “The DEA could have also easily negotiated industrial hemp farming rules with North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson who has been talking to them about this for a year. Instead, they kept stalling until the time to plant had passed,” says Mr. Murphy. “North Dakota had nothing left to do but cut the DEA out of the picture.” “I applied for my ND license in January and was hopeful the DEA would act quickly and affirm my right to plant industrial hemp this year. Unfortunately, the DEA has not responded in any way other than to state that it would take them a lot more time than the window of time I have to import seed and plant the crop,” said ND farmer, David Monson. “It appears that DEA really doesn’t want to work with anyone to resolve the issue”, Monson added. The hemp language in HB 1020 was the result of several months of fruitless negotiations between the DEA and North Dakota officials, who hoped to gain federal recognition for the state-licensed hemp farmers. It amends the state hemp farming law to explicitly remove the Drug Enforcement Administration from the process. “The legislative action is a direct response to the DEA's refusal to waive registration requirements, including $3,440 per farmer in non-refundable yearly application fees, and the agency's inability to respond to the farmers' federal applications in time for spring planting,” says Alexis Baden-Mayer, Vote Hemp’s Legislative Director. Read the DEA letter that was ND's last straw at http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/DEA_Letter_to_NDDA_03272007.pdf “The North Dakota legislature's bold action gives Vote Hemp the opportunity we've been working towards for nearly a decade. Now that there is a state with comprehensive hemp farming regulations that has explicitly eschewed DEA involvement, we can finally make the case that states have the legal ability to regulate industrial hemp farming within their borders without federal interference,” says Baden-Mayer. Adding, “And, because ND Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson actually did spend nearly a year trying to work out an agreement with the DEA, it’s clear that DEA isn’t going to act in a reasonable way and isn’t ever to going to acknowledge the practical differences between industrial hemp and marijuana and accommodate ND's plan to commercialize hemp farming.” # # #
Location: 
Bismarck, ND
United States

N.D. lawmaker encourages hemp production in Vt.

Location: 
Montpelier, VT
United States
Publication/Source: 
Rutland Herald (VT)
URL: 
http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070430/NEWS04/704300371/1024/NEWS04

Vote Hemp Press Release: Eleven Farming States Introduce Hemp Legislation in 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, April 25, 2007 CONTACT: Adam Eidinger T: 202-744-2671, E: [email protected] or Tom Murphy T: 207-542-4998, E: [email protected] Eleven Farming States Introduce Hemp Legislation in 2007 Bills Change State Law to Allow Hemp Farming, Allow for Studies, and/or Resolutions Urging Action from DEA and Congress WASHINGTON, DC – Vote Hemp, the nation’s leading grassroots organization working to give farmers the right to grow non-psychoactive industrial hemp to be made into everything from food, clothing, paper, body care, bio-fuel and even auto parts, is pleased by the progress of hemp bills on the state level so far in 2007. The states that have introduced industrial hemp bills this legislative season are: California, Hawaii, Idaho, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont, and Wisconsin. North Dakota leads the pack with five bills introduced in 2007, with two of the five, SB 2099 and HB 1490, having been signed by Gov. John Hoeven. Two of the bills were resolutions urging Congress to recognize the multiple benefits of industrial hemp and to direct DEA to differentiate between industrial hemp and marijuana. The fifth bill, HB 1020, has passed both the House and Senate and is on its way to the Governor’s desk. California’s hemp farming bill, AB 684 has passed through two Assembly committees on its course to a floor vote. HB 1535, the hemp farming bill in Hawaii is in three committees and will be carried over to the next legislative session. Idaho’s resolution asking the U.S. Congress to legalize hemp farming was killed in the House Agricultural Affairs Committee earlier this year without gaining a bill number. New Hampshire hemp farming bill, HB 424, passed the House on a 190-76 vote earlier this month and had a hearing in the Senate Commerce, Labor and Consumer Protection Committee this week. New Mexico passed a hemp study memorial and Congressional resolution, HM 49, with an overwhelming 59-2 vote in the House. Minnesota had a hemp farming bill, HF 2168, introduced late last month and has been referred to the House Agriculture, Rural Economies and Veterans Affairs committee. South Carolina study bill, H 3305, was introduced in January and is stalled in the House Committee on Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs. In Oregon there is SB 348 which would allow farmers to grow hemp under state rules. Vermont’s hemp farming bill, H 267, is in the House Agriculture Committee and hearings will take place this week. Wisconsin’s hemp study bill, AB 146, just had a successful hearing last week in the Assembly Rural Economic Development committee. All state hemp bills and resolutions introduced since 1995 are listed in the chart at http://www.votehemp.com/state.html. H.R. 1009, the "Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2007," was introduced in Congress in January. The bill excludes industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana" in the Controlled Substances Act and gives states the exclusive authority to regulate the growing and processing of industrial hemp under state law. The full text of H.R. 1009, Rep. Paul's House floor comments, and the CRS Report "Hemp as an Agricultural Commodity" can all be read at http://www.votehemp.com/federal.html. “Under the current national drug control policy, industrial hemp can be imported, but it can’t be grown by American farmers,” says Eric Steenstra, President of Vote Hemp. “The DEA has taken the Controlled Substances Act’s antiquated definition of marijuana out of context and used it as an excuse to block industrial hemp farming. The Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2007 will bring us back to more rational times when the government regulated marijuana, but told farmers they could go ahead and continue raising hemp just as they always had,” says Mr. Steenstra. # # #
Location: 
United States

Hemp Hoe Down 7

For the first time in its seven-year history, The Hemp Hoe Down (HHD) will be a four day event from Thursday May 10th up through Sunday Night May 13th. The HHD will again take place at the Elk View Campground, which is located five miles South of Sturgis, SD, at exit 37 off of Interstate 90, on the North Eastern side of the interstate. The festivities will kick off Thursday with Slip Disc productions’ DJs spinning from 7pm to 4am. Slip Disc Productions was responsible for the popular Badlands Electronic Music Festival in 2002. Several original artists will be performing on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday including Solution, an amazing jam-jazz band from Sioux Falls on Friday, New Primitives, Minneapolis’s award winning reggae band on Saturday, and Mad Hats and Violent Hippie, Spearfish’s best, on Sunday. Music will be stationed under a big top circus tent this year to increase the sound value of the event. Several sustainable workshops will again be offered, including building with cob, offered by Natural Villages, and converting a diesel engine to run on waste vegetable oil. Workshops on Wind and Solar Energy by High Plains Wind Energy will also be offered. In addition we will be offering classes on making bio-diesel, making body salve, and making paper with a blender. Inside the Elk View Campground Pavilion will be offered organic hemp meals from the Organnabis Kitchen, Hemp Beer, and the widest selection of hemp/eco clothing, paper products, accessories and goods in the region. We are also proud to introduce Hemp Milk from Living Harvest. It is sure to be a big hit. Hemp Milk is a great way to take advantage of the superior nutritional value of the hemp seed, including all 10 essential amino acids, and all 4 essential fatty acids. Wind and solar energy green tags from Pine Ridge hemp farmer and former president of the Reservation, Alex White Plume, who will be making his annual appearance and speech on Friday May 11th, will supplement the energy used for this event. In addition, the PBS documentary, “Silent Standing Nation”, on the White Plumes will be shown Friday afternoon and Saturday afternoon. A workshop on how to put up a tipi will be offered Friday around 3 pm. The price is set at $10/night for Thursday, $15 for Friday, $15 for Saturday, and $10 for Sunday. Attendees may purchase a ticket for $35 that is good for all four nights at www.hemphoedown.com. All prices include camping. Tickets can be purchased, and other more detailed information on the workshops, the Frisbee golf tournament, speakers, and links to the band’s music can be obtained at the website www.hemphoedown.com. The tickets are printed on 100% hemp paper. People of all ages are welcome to attend. Kids under 13 are free. The event is indoor/outdoor and will take place rain or shine. Camping is free. Hemp Hoe Down 7 is sponsored by Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps and Global Market. Thursday’s DJ night will include performances from Johnny 000 (Deep, Slip Disc, Rapid City,) Nick Rave (drum’ n’ bass, Slip Disc, RC,) Kung Pow (urban house, Slip Disc, RC,) Mac (drum’ n’ bass, Okizoo, RC,) Tek Steze (tech house, Okizoo, RC,) DJ Solful (drum’ n’ bass, RC,) EASE 95 (new jive, Okizoo, RC,) Chucky (tech house, Mixed Up, RC,) and DJ Manatea (Jungle, DJ4Norml Project, Casper, WY.) Friday will feature music the Javier Trego Trio. Javier has been dubbed ‘little Santana” by his peers in Minneapolis. His guitar renditions are sure to amaze. Tommy ‘the silent’ will also perform. Tommy is a keyboardist for Tone Grown, and Violent Hippie. His solo act on guitar is very mellifluous. He seems to invent new ways to play the guitar. Up first on Friday May 11th is the band Lunar Funk Theory, a funk band from Sioux Falls. The band Solution will complete the night. They are going to play two high-energy jazz like jam sessions to close out the evening. Come and check them out if you like to get down and dance. Saturday will feature music from Juliet and Judah James, a duet from Minneapolis. Each musician will also perform a solo set sometime throughout the weekend. Juliet’s voice is spectacular. She will leave the crowd jubilant with tears in their eyes screaming for freedom. In the early evening Mace, an amazing blues singer from Ohio will perform with Rapid City rockers Tone Grown backing him up. Then Tone Grown will take the stage, with Mace playing base and singing some songs. Expect these sets to outdo anything you have seen Tone Grown perform up to this point. Closing out the night will be Minneapolis’s best reggae band, New Primitives. If you like reggae, then don’t miss this set. Also on Saturday May 11th will be Chris Olsen (keyboards, Boulder, CO,) Dog War (Reggae, RC,) and Governor’s Suite, a jam band from Sioux Falls. Sunday, Mother’s Day, will feature Spearfish bands Violent Hippie and Mad Hats. Violent Hippie is Chris Cady’s new punk rock creation. Mad Hats are a rock band that plays a wide blend of material. Both bands will play together in-between their sets. Also featured will be the Sequoia Trio, which is made up of Sequoia, Tone Grown’s Todd Rigione on bass, and Jon Margolis on drums. Also performing is Lange Termes, a folk singer from Bozeman, MT, who is son of legendary artist Dick Termes, and Free World Revolution, an acoustic band from Sioux Falls. Sunday’s festivities will be aimed at celebrating Mother Earth. Much more musical entertainment will be featured at the HHD. Other acts will be announced as they are confirmed. Check out Hemphoedown.com to hear the bands and to see the updated set list. From 1 to 5 pm on Saturday there will be a Frisbee Golf Tournament. The tournament is free and open to all attendees. Participants must bring their own discs. The nets will be set up all four day for practice and for fun. Plenty of hemp gear, including t-shirts, hats, caps, bags, health bars, fuel bars, candles, lip balm, lotion, salve, socks, boxers, panties, rolling papers, soaps, belts, dog leashes, prayer flags, journals, wallets, and long sleeve t-shirts will be for sale at the Hempire vending station. Participants are encouraged to bring camping gear, water, and warm clothes for the evening, with a big smile eager to learn about nature’s most useful crop. All outside alcohol must be kept away from the main building. Illegal drugs are not allowed. All dogs must be leashed. No glass containers are allowed. Please be respectful. For more information, contact Jeremy Briggs of Keefe Green Productions at 605-484-1806 or [email protected].
Date: 
Thu, 05/10/2007 - 7:00pm - Sun, 05/13/2007 - 12:00am
Location: 
United States

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