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CDC Prepares New Opioid Prescribing Guidelines, OH Senate Won't Take Up Legalization Voter Init, More... (2/10/22)

The South Carolina Senate approves a medica marijuana bill, a new Rand study tracks opioid prescribing declines, and more.

Opioid pain prescribing practices are in the news. (Creative Commons)
Marijuana Policy

Ohio GOP Senate Leader Says He Will Not Bring Marijuana Legalization Initiative to a Vote. State Senate President Matt Huffman (R-Lima) says he will not bring the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol's marijuana legalization initiative to a vote in the Senate. Under Ohio law, petitioners who collect the requisite number of valid voter signatures for a ballot initiative then place the proposal before the legislature, which has four months to act on it. If the legislature refuses to act on the proposal or rejects it, petitioners can undertake a second round of signature gathering and, if successful, present the issue to directly to the voters.

"I don't want anybody to misunderstand my position," Huffman said. "I'm not going to bring it to the Senate floor. And if that means people want to go put it on the ballot, have at it." While the Coalition has yet to comment on Huffman's remarks, it has previously indicated it will indeed proceed to that second round of signature gathering. They will need to come up with 132,887 valid voter signatures to make the November ballot.

Medical Marijuana

South Carolina Senate Approves Medical Marijuana Bill. After the debate on medical marijuana made it to the Senate floor last week, the Senate on Wednesday approved the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act (Senate Bill 150). The bill gets a final vote in the Senate Thursday, before heading to the House, where its fate is unclear. Whether House Speaker Jay Lucas (R) will let the bill move in his chamber remains uncertain. And Gov. Henry McMaster (R) remains noncommittal on whether he would sign the bill, saying "that would depend on a lot of things."

Opioids

Opioid Prescribing Declines, but Cuts Are Not Uniform Across Locations, Age Groups, or Type of Prescriber. The volume of prescription opioids dispensed from retail pharmacies declined by 21% from 2008 to 2018, but the decline was not uniform across geographic areas, among types of patients, or by type of prescriber, according to a new RAND Corporation study. The study, published by the Annals of Internal Medicine, is the first to examine the decline in opioid prescriptions filled at retail pharmacies based on both volume and potency of the drugs dispensed.

The study found that over the study period, per capita MME (morphine milligram equivalents) volume declined the most in metropolitan counties (more than 22%) and in counties with higher rates of fatal opioid overdoses (a 35% decline). Substantial variation existed both within and across states. In some states, MME volume per capita increased in multiple counties. In many other states, there were both counties with increases and others with substantial decreases. Counties that experienced substantial decreases in per capita MME often were adjacent to counties with per capita increases.

Most clinical specialties recorded declines in the MME volume per practicing clinician. The greatest decrease in MME volume per practicing clinician was among adult primary care physicians (40% decline) and pain specialists (15% decline) -- the clinicians with the highest MME volume per clinician in 2008 -- 2009. The greatest percentage decrease was among emergency physicians (71% decline) -- clinicians who are likely prescribing opioids predominantly to patients experiencing acute pain in acute care settings.

"These results suggest the effects of clinician and policymaker efforts to reduce opioid prescribing have affected populations differently," Stein said. "Future efforts to enhance clinically appropriate opioid prescribing may need to be more clinically nuanced and targeted for specific populations."

CDC Proposes New, Slightly Looser Opioid Prescribing Guidelines. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursday released new draft guidelines for prescribing opioids for pain relief. The new guidelines remove previously recommended ceilings on doses for chronic pain patients, leaving it instead for doctors to use their own best judgment. But they also urge doctors to first resort to "nonopioid therapies" for both chronic and acute pain.

The new guidelines are the first comprehensive revisions of the CDC's 2016 guidelines, and attempt to find the proper balance between alleviating severe pain and exposing patients to the perils of opioids. The new guidelines have now been published in the Federal Register and are open for comments. Comment here.

Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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Ohio Repubs couldn't care less what Ohio voters want

Hopefully legalized weed will be shoved down their uber hypocritical alcohol guzzling throats.

Intractable Pain Patients: Will they get proper analgesic?

Let us watch whether the Standard of Care for post-surgery, acute pain and chronic pain changes. Substitution for a stable Rx opioid medication protocol then forced titration because of junk science resulted in my body developing esophagus and duodenal ulcers. Anemia with RBC less than "9". It was hell. 

Even more sinister is the computer analytics "big business" which profited on the hysteria of denying suffering patients proper opioid analgesia, whether in hospital or at home. 

MMJ may work for some patients, but it is  NOT analgesic. Until MMJ is given a proper US NDC number, it will never be used in a hospital clinical setting. MMJ as a medical approach to controlling pain (especially acute pain) is a myth. 

Meanwhile, we the injured and suffering await restoration of physician-patient decision making for opioid therapy.

The harm done to legitimate pain patients

What pain patients have been through is unconscionable. Someday, they will write books about this era's opiate hysteria and the harms effected by heavy-handed public health policy. I trust those books will not be kind to the people who pushed this agenda.

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