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Chronicle AM: Kampia Out as MPP Head, Denver Bans Kratom Sales, More... (11/21/17)

A key Republican senator -- from the south -- has authored an appropriations bill that would not bar DC from allowing marijuana sales, longtime MPP head Rob Kampia steps down, Denver bans kratom sales, and more.

After nearly a quarter of a century, Rob Kampia has stepped down as head of the Marijuana Policy Project. (YouTube)
Marijuana Policy

GOP Senator's Bill Would Let DC Legalize Marijuana Sales. Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS), chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has authored a District of Columbia appropriations bill that does not contain a budget rider barring the city from spending its own money to set up a system to tax and regulate marijuana sales. Although DC voters approved legalization in 2014, they did not legalize sales because DC law does not allow initiatives to address tax and funding issues. The DC council was expected to enact laws allowing for sales, but has been blocked by congressional riders in DC appropriations bills. But the House has already passed an appropriations bill that contains the rider, so even if the Senate bill passes, it will have to be sorted out in conference committee.

Kampia Out as Marijuana Policy Project Executive Director, Will Take Up Fundraising Role. MPP cofounder and long-time executive director Rob Kampia is leaving that role, but will remain with the organization as director of strategic development. He is being replaced on an interim basis by Matthew Schweich, who joined the group as director of state campaigns in 2015, while the MPP and MPP Foundation boards seek a permanent replacement. "This transition has been considered carefully by Rob and the board. We desired to shift Rob's workload one year ago after his intense work on the Nevada and Arizona campaigns," said Troy Dayton, who sits on the boards of directors for MPP and MPP Foundation. "Shortly after Election Day, Rob quickly shifted gears in December to start the Michigan 2018 legalization campaign. With the Michigan signature drive now complete, it is the right time to shift Rob's focus to new and bigger projects."

New Jersey Legislative Black Caucus Chair Skeptical on Legalization, Will Hold Hearings on "Negative Consequences." State Sen. Ronald Rice (D-Essex), head of the Legislative Black Caucus, announced Monday that he will hold hearings on the negative consequences of marijuana legalization in states that have already legalized it. "We know there are negative factors that we will need to safeguard against, from children's access to marijuana-infused edibles to motor vehicle accidents caused by impaired driving to the effect of marijuana on babies and the impact of legalization on communities of color," he said in a statement. "As chair of the Legislative Black Caucus, I plan to convene hearings at various locations around the state to make sure that we really delve into the details of this issue," Rice said. Incoming Gov. Phil Murphy (D) has said he supports legalization, and a bill to do that is alive in the legislature.

Kratom

Denver Bans Kratom Sales. Denver Environmental Health announced Monday that it has banned the sale of kratom within the city. The move comes days after the Food & Drug Administration issued a public health advisory against consumption of the herb, which works on the body's opioid receptors and has been popular as a pain reliever and for people attempting to wean themselves from opioids. The ban is not complete, however: The herb may still be sold for non-consumptive uses, such as aromatherapy or soap making, as long as it bears a warning label that it is not intended for human consumption.

International

Philippines Supreme Court Hears Case Challenging Drug War. The Supreme Court began hearing oral arguments Monday in a case challenging the Philippines National Police's anti-drug operations that have resulted in the deaths of thousands of drug suspects. Attorneys challenging the campaign accuse the police of violating numerous rights guaranteed under national law, including human and privacy rights. Coming in for close scrutiny was a PNP policy that allowed police to go house to house for searches and to build cases against anyone who refused to allow them warrantless entry. Lawyers also accused PNP polices of expressly authorizes police to kill drug suspects. Oral arguments will continue next week.

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