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Latin America: Prohibition-Related Violence Surges in Mexico

More than 100 people, including at least 20 police officers, died in prohibition-related violence in Mexico in the past week as drug trafficking organizations -- the so-called cartels -- shot it out with police, soldiers, and each other in cities across the country. Among those killed were Federal Preventive Police (PFP) Commander Édgar Millán, assassinated on his doorstep in Mexico City, and Ciudad Juárez Municipal Police Chief Juan Antonio Román, gunned down in front of his home Saturday in a hail of bullets.

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At least three other high-ranking PFP commanders have been gunned down in Mexico City in the past few days, presumably by gunmen of the Sinaloa Cartel, headed by Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán. Another PFP commander, Arturo Cabrera, narrowly escaped the assassin's bullet Tuesday in Monterrey. He was attacked by gunmen as he left the state police academy, but managed to retreat back to the base, where he managed to hold off his attackers with his own gun until being rescued by a police SWAT team.

Guzmán's own son, Édgar Guzmán, was himself gunned down in Culiacán, the capital of Sinaloa, on Saturday, presumably by gunmen of the rival Juárez Cartel, which has been battling Guzman's group for control over the drug traffic there. That was only the latest flare-up in two weeks of violence there that have seen bloody attacks on PFP and local police, massive multi-vehicle convoys of armed narcos marauding through the streets, and an infusion of 3,000 more soldiers into the state.

Mexican President Felipe Calderón deployed the Mexican military a year and half ago in a bid to break the power of the cartels. But with some 30,000 soldiers now deployed in the fight, the violence not only continues, but seems to be escalating. Around 3,000 people have been killed since Calderón's offensive began, more than 1,100 of them so far this year, according to Mexican media reports.

The US Congress is now debating approval of a $1.6 billion, three-year anti-drug aid package for Mexico, heavily tilted toward military assistance. While the violence would appear to strengthen the case for such an aid program, it is unclear whether an infusion of military training and technology will have a positive impact on Mexico's drug war.

[Ed: In February 2003, a Mexican congressman from Sinaloa, Gregorio Urías Germán, after calling for drug legalization, attended our Latin America conference, "Out from the Shadows: Ending Drug Prohibition in the 21st Century" ("Saliendo de las sombras: Terminando con la prohibición de las drogas en el Siglo XXI" en español). Urías argued that "If we can't even discuss the alternatives, if we can't even admit the drug war is a failure, then we will never solve the problem." He said that existing forums, such as the UN and the Organization of American States, are not fruitful places for discussion, "because only the repressive policies of the United States are discussed at these forums." Sinaloa continues to suffer from the violence caused by drug prohibition, as discussed in this newsbrief five years later. In different but similar ways, inner-city neighborhoods throughout the US suffer from violence and disorder caused by prohibition as well.]

Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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I don't know....

If I trust all these stories about the violence in Mexico. Isn't it convenient that all this is being reported at the time when the greedy mexicons are looking for more drug money from the U.S. I have read stories about Journalists who took drugs and money from drug cartels to put their 'spin' on stories and leave out important info about them. Look at all the honest Journalists the drug cartels have killed....I'm tired of the steady diet of lies we are constantly fed and I am begining to recognize the 'taste' when I read them....

It's very true and very bloody

(very good videos)

aljazeera english:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AB45FVHoGRM ---- interview with a mexican journalist who supports drug legalization

mexican tv:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN3i8_8NxUs ----- footage of a battle between cartels and the military
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNRg91kdGN0&feature=related ----- Drug traffickers take over a hospital after trying to rescue one of his members that was shot earlier that day. Hours after negotiating they were all captured by the police.
- the spanish newscaster said one man was killed by the police during the operation.

correction

mexican novelist, not mexican journalist (my bad)

It's True, People are Dying

in Mexico right now because of the United States perverted policies. You'd best do some research if you don't believe the killing is real and that Prohibition is indeed the cause. Everyone in Mexico gets paid, that's the way it's done there. Actually, that's the way it's done here too. That's why so many border agents and police and drug interdiction folks get dirty and makes lots of money letting drugs into the country or running them themselves. So Congress wants to throw more of your money down the drain in Mexico. You are aware that the War on Drugs is a failure??? So throwing more $$ at it is futile.

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