Law Enforcement: This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A Virginia sheriff and most of his department goes down for reselling seized drug and guns, a Border Patrol guard gets caught turning a blind eye in exchange for sex and cash, dope is missing from the Boston Police evidence warehouse, a small town police chief pleads guilty to protecting crack dealers, and two cops are going to prison for dealing drugs.

Two of our stories this week are from Mississippi, but there are a lot more crooked cops down in the Mudcat State, as the Jackson Clarion-Ledger noted last Friday in an article simply -- and aptly--titled "Accused-Lawmen List Grows." Let's get to it:

In Henry County, Viriginia, Henry County Sheriff Harold Cassell was indicted for covering up the sale of seized guns and drugs by 13 of his deputies. The sheriff's department crew made up 14 of 19 people indicted on charges including racketeering conspiracy, weapons offenses, narcotics distribution, obstruction of justice and perjury. The crew is accused of stealing drugs and guns being held by the department; distributing cocaine, marijuana, and "a date rape drug; money laundering; and obstruction of justice. Virginia state police have been sent in to patrol the county now that a substantial portion of the sheriff's department is behind bars. Cassell himself is out on $25,000 bond. He is accused of failing to take action after being notified of corrupt activities, helping to launder money, and lying to federal investigators.

In Seattle, a US border guard made bail Tuesday after being accused of letting drugs get through the border in return for cash and sexual favors from a female drug smuggler. Desmone Bastian allegedly allowed the smuggler, who is also a brothel madam, to make repeated trips into the United States carrying marijuana and Oxycontin. He came under suspicion when he was observed leaving his post at the Blaine, Washington, border crossing to approach her car, which was found to contain 3,000 Oxycontin tablets when it was searched. A review of border crossing records revealed she had made repeated trips through the border checkpoint, often in Bastian's lane, but had never been subjected to close inspection.

In Boston, the Boston Police Department's anti-corruption unit is investigating whether police officers stole drugs missing from an evidence warehouse. Earlier this month, police announced that some seized drugs could not be accounted for, but suggested they might only have been misplaced as they were moved from one section of the warehouse to another. Now, however, Boston police admit the drugs are missing, although they won't say which drugs or how much. As the investigation continues, local prosecutors are pondering how they will prosecute criminal cases without the evidence.

In Oxford, Mississippi, Ruleville Police Chief Ronald Durelle Robinson pleaded guilty October 26 to extortion for accepting cash payments to not file drug and gambling charges against a crack cocaine distributor. Robinson, 46, and Ruleville Assistant Police Chief Larry Mitchell, 33, were indicted by a federal grand jury in July on charges they provided protection to crack dealers and people they thought were crack dealers between December 2003 and June 2006. Robinson was originally charged with two counts of extortion and four counts of attempting to aid in the possession of crack cocaine with the intent to distribute, but the feds dropped all but one extortion count in exchange for the guilty plea. He faces up to 20 years in prison.

In Biloxi, Mississippi, a veteran Biloxi Police Department officer was sentenced Monday to 5 years in prison for selling Ecstasy. Officer Darrell Cvitanovich Jr. pleaded guilty earlier this month after he was arrested when a June raid of his home turned up several Ecstasy tablets. Circuit Court Judge Robert Clark sentenced Cvitanovich to 15 years in prison, but suspended 10. Cvitanovich has until noon on November 15 to turn himself over to the Mississippi Department of Corrections.

In Milwaukee, a former Milwaukee Police Department detective was sentenced last Friday to four years in prison on federal cocaine distribution and conspiracy charges. Detective Larry White, a 10-year veteran of the force, transported cocaine from Illinois to Wisconsin for his then brother-in-law in 2004 and 2005, earning $1,000 per trip, according to court records. During sentencing, White's lawyers played for sympathy, arguing that White had become addicted to cocaine because of job stress and the killing of a nephew. The sob story must have worked because US District Court Judge Lynn Adelman sentenced him well below the advisory federal sentencing guidelines. Under the guidelines, he should be doing 5 ½ to 6 years.

Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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Inmates set up?

It seems that up to 100 staff members (a number given to me by a US Probation Officer in Fresno, Ca.) were involved in a conspiracy to smuggle tobacco into the Oakdale FCI in Oakdale,La. Oakdale FCI is a non-smoking facility. They were selling they tobacco to the inmates for $4,000 per carton! Inmates would have parents, friends and relatives send the monies to the inmates or someone else to pay the smugglers (BOP STAFF!) then break down the cigarettes and sell some to other inmates to lessen their very expensive smoking habit.
A staff member was caught smuggling the tobacco in to the institution and immediately told on everyone, especially the inmates. This particular staff member resigned; however was not punished. I do not believe anything was done to the remaining staff involved.
For the inmates who bought the tobacco from the staff, it is a completely different story. All of them were taken off the yard, put in the hole, received sanctions (loss of good time, loss of phone privileges, loss of visitation privileges and transfers to high security prisons. Further, many of those people that sent money to the inmates have been questioned and threatened by the government.
Talk about entrapment! These inmates did not seek out staff to engage in this activity. It was a plot hatched by the people in charge. Then when it blew up the only ones punished were those entrapped.

Crooked staff...

They are all bad. A screw is a screw. To trust one is to lose. I hate stories like this; nobody should have to go through this ever.

these cops suck !!!!!!!!!

ok im new to this site but im enjoing myself reading these corrupt cop stories.... personally i believe that there is not one straight cop, theyr all either corrupt by taking money from rich people or they just sell the dope that they take from harmless individuals that just wanna get high. im pretty sure that there is no completely clean officer cuz i mean what would u do if u seized a kilo of the finest coke? or anything for that matter. wat im trying to say is if i were a member of the DEA or any task force for that matter id be hooked on whatever i bust. lol

small town dirty crooked RAMBOS'

I'm certain all cops aren't dirty,,but the few that are,,is like the rotton apple in the basket ruining the rest. I didnt do a damn thing,, was charged with fleeing and eluding,,felony,,and tazed to near death. fought it all the way to trial,,,him no longer a cop,,and a crooked atty. and just as dirty Pros. atty. A dash cam recorded the entire scene,,,even the states atty,,said it was on record. Was never entered ,,,,I wonder why? In a small town as this one,,too much cover-up cause they are basically all friends to one another. And victims like me,,,,and there are many,,pay the price for their personal gain with no guilt on their part for practically ruining another persons life in the process. The system has FAILED when WE as a community allow this to go on!

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