2010 Election Results

 

 

Dear friends:

Yesterday voters turned out across the nation to vote on a number of marijuana-related initiatives, including four major statewide initiatives. Here are the results:

Arizona: Proposition 203, which would bring a working medical marijuana law to the state, is too-close-to-call at the moment, as tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of additional ballots remain to be counted.  MPP will continue to closely monitor the outcome of this proposition over the coming days.

California: Proposition 19, which would have made the personal possession and cultivation of marijuana legal and would have allowed regulated distribution systems on the local level, did not pass. It did, however, receive a very respectable 46 percent of the vote.

South Dakota: Measure 13, which would have protected seriously ill South Dakota residents from arrest and prosecution for using medical marijuana with their doctor’s recommendation, was ultimately rejected by voters.

Oregon: Measure 74, which would have established oversight and licensing requirements for medical marijuana dispensaries in Oregon, was also defeated by the voters yesterday. This loss, however, does not in any way affect Oregon's existing medical marijuana law.

On a positive note, two gubernatorial candidates with good positions on marijuana policy reform won their respective elections.  Peter Shumlin in Vermont and Dan Malloy in Connecticut both have positive outlooks on marijuana decriminalization, giving those states a leg-up when it comes to passing positive marijuana-related laws in the next several years. Incidentally, Shumlin also supports dispensaries, which are not currently a part of Vermont's medical marijuana law.

Finally, here are the results of some significant local marijuana-related initiatives across the country:

California: Two of two dispensary bans were defeated in California local elections. Additionally, Kamala Harris is currently maintaining a slim margin of victory over drug-warrior Steve Cooley in the California race for attorney general race.

Massachusetts: Nine of nine public policy questions asking legislatures to vote in favor of taxing and regulating marijuana like alcohol passed. Nine of nine public policy questions asking legislatures to vote in favor of medical marijuana legislation passed.

Colorado: In 42 cities and counties in the state, voters were asked whether medical marijuana dispensaries should be allowed in their locality. Citizens in eight of these regions voted to allow the dispensaries.

Wisconsin:Two of two referenda asking the Wisconsin legislature to enact medical marijuana legislation passed.

We've all seen the election results by now, and while some may feel disappointed, I believe now is the time for us to look ahead.  2012 is closer than it seems, and with marijuana-related issues now firmly entrenched in the national consciousness we have an opportunity to forge ahead and make 2012 the most successful year we've ever experienced.  But we can't do it alone.

Of the nearly 100,000 people who will receive this email today, less than 6,000 have donated to MPP's work so far this year.  If you and the other 94,000 people who have not yet donated each gave just $10 to MPP today, we would generate nearly $1,000,000.  That's money that we can put directly toward ending marijuana prohibition sooner, rather than later.

Ending marijuana prohibition is a matter of 'when,' not 'if' and every dollar you donate helps bring that 'when' closer to today.

Sincerely,

Rob Kampia
Executive Director
Marijuana Policy Project
Washington, D.C.


 


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