SDSU SSDP President's Speech Today.

I was able to get my hands on a transcription of the speech that San Diego State University SSDP President Randy Hencken gave to many San Diego media outlets at a protest to "Operation Sudden Fall". Randy is very well spoken and you can read the details in his speech. ABC News ran a story mentioning the protest and also included excerpts from Randy's speech.
Good morning, Before me are 77 chairs and 77 diplomas, each representing a young person who was recently a student here at SDSU, but who is no longer with us. 2 of them were recently lost to tragic, yet preventable drug overdoses. And 75 of them were arrested as part of yesterday's reactionary drug sting. 77 students are gone from campus, but we must ask ourselves, has drug abuse left the campus as a result? Are students any safer from dying of an entirely preventable drug overdose? Sadly, the answer to both questions is "No." As students and parents who have seen the devastation that drug abuse can cause, we know that preventing abuse, addiction, and overdose is an essential undertaking. So it would be comforting for us to believe that yesterday's sensational arrests signal an end to drug abuse on this campus. But we've seen those big piles of drugs and money on our TV screens before, over and over again, for the past 3 decades, and the availability of drugs has not changed. So long as students have a desire to use illegal drugs, and so long as the policy of prohibition sustains a lucrative black market, drug stings will do little more than create openings for others to step in and supply these drugs. If anything, new dealers will probably come from off campus, be better armed, and present a greater threat to SDSU students. Are we defending the students' decision to break the law? Of course not. But we must question a system of prohibition that lures entrepreneurial students into becoming drug dealers, and which will continue to do so even after we lock up hundreds of our peers. SDSU should instead pursue effective alternatives that actually address drug abuse problems, including overdose. Good Samaritan Policies are such an example. These policies, which are being adopted by colleges with increasing frequency, protect students who call for help during overdose emergencies. It is a policy that has been proven to save lives. In fact, researchers found Cornell University's Good Samaritan Policy to have dramatically increased the amount of 911 calls related to overdoses, ensuring that students' safety remains the school's top priority. And if that's what this is really all about -- improving the safety of students on campus -- then the biggest tragedy of all is that this drug sting will make students more hesitant to call for help during overdose emergencies, placing even more students at risk. SDSU officials can ensure that this doesn't happen by enacting a life-saving Good Samaritan Policy immediately. Thank you.
Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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ABC News Article

I wasn't able to post the blog with the link correctly sorry
http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/Story?id=4806777&page=1

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