Dispensary make the same profits as drug dealers

I live on the California border, so I keep up on medical marijuana there. I also have chronic pain from back surgery, so I understand the patients side. Dispensaries in California may be proving the other sides point. I tell people all the time, that if we make drugs legal, it will take the profit out of drugs, and the drug dealers will go away. The California dispensaries sell a plant for almost the price of gold, and that's the problem, they sell it for the same price the drug dealers do. No wonder dispensaries have sprung up everywhere, the profits are huge. Dispensaries need to make a profit, but it should be a reasonable price, set by actual cost to produce with a reasonable profit. No plant that grows as easy as marijuana should sell for $500 an ounce. As long as dispensaries act like drug dealers, I'm afraid they will be treated like drug dealers by the government. E. Jay Fleming Speaker Law Enforcement Against Prohibition
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perspective

good point, Jay..

here are my thoughts:

as someone who worked with Dennis Peron on a fundraiser to get the original initiative on the ballot, i was aware of both sides of the argument - that is both sides of the dispensaries' own discussion on the matter.

one camp raised the concern that you do, and another more practical camp held that we were an oppressed minority fighting a long - and expensive - legal battle, constantly being hauled into court to defend ourselves, and that we were terminally underfunded and that charging what the market would bear acted as a progressive tax levied upon supporters of the measure: it was like making a contribution, and getting something immediately beneficial in return.

to bridge the gap, there was always free (albeit fairly low grade) pot available to indigents (on the honour system), with prices kicking in for the mid-grade and exotic stuff.

in those days, nobody involved was rich as far as i could tell, and most monies went into keeping the movement alive, and there's also the market leverage of fear, that is, risk adds value to the product, since, even though it's *technically* cheap to grow, there's much fewer people willing to grow it when it's illegal, which keeps the price at a premium. how much would *you* feel is worth going to jail for? jail sucks, and most of these guys have been there and back, so i think they deserve every penny they make.

if there could be a legal arrangement with commerical growers that supply the dispensaries (even if many of those growers are affiliated with them) not to bust them, then supply might rise and prices might go down.

ultimately, though, legal competition is what brings prices down, and as long as people's only other alternative is to risk their freedom and maybe even safety buying on the street for equally high prices, there's no incentive to lower them. those who use "dispensary profiteering" as an argument against legalisation don't (or won't) make the connection that only legalisation can prevent it. ousting the dispensaries will just push everyone back onto the street where the*real* harm is.

another way to bring down prices without outright legalisation could be to subsidise growers and/or dispensaries to provide free or cheap product to low income people - as most dispensaries already do, but this isn't publicised, of course.

the problem is trying to walk this ideological tightrope of approving of something while maintaining this public posture that it is "bad", and being afraid to actually assist in the process as is done in the ""fully" legal health market as with Medicare and in the private sector programs.

i do see what you're saying, but i think it's holding dispensaries to some kind of Mother Theresa standards while other health providers are driving ferraris. if i could buy Dennis Peron a ferrari, i would. he's an American Hero - a true freedom fighter - and he'd look great in one!!

i do agree though, that minorities throughout the ages have been held to a higher standard than others, and have to appear *twice* as respectable just break even in the credibility game. so it might be a good "PR tactic" to operate on a charity level, just to avoid the "moral panic" reaction of "rampant profiteering", even while Haliburton and friends routinely cash in on every human tragedy that comes down the pike, moreso than even the most unscrupulous "drug pusher" (in my 30 years in the culture i've still yet to see one of these mythical creatures)..

i think they're about as justified as anyone else to milk the market, but yes, they might be advised to don their hair shirts and white habits, just to disarm the opposition a bit..

LEAP_Speaker's picture

Things must change or we will never win this battle

Sorry the reply was slow, I had some health problems.

In the past medical marijuana was illegal under state and federal law. Today under California state law medicinal marijuana is legal, but cannot be sold for a profit. Yet some dispensaries have made as much as $95 million in 4 years.

The medical marijuana market in California is driven by black market prices, and dispensaries are guided by profit, not compassion. I just don’t like when people say there out to help patients, when they really just want their money.

Marijuana works better for the nerve pain in my legs than the morphine I take every day. I’m disabled and get $1100 a month, so tell me what should I cut out so I could afford the medicine I need, rent, electricity, or my phone?

The California dispensary system hasn’t helped the medical marijuana movement; it set it back many years. Until we remove the enormous profits generated by the black market and get medicine to the people who need it, at a price they can afford, medical marijuana sellers will be seen as nothing more than drug dealers making enormous profits from sick people.

If it walks like a drug dealer, and quacks like a drug dealer, it's a drug dealer to DEA, and I’m afraid it always will be.

E. Jay Fleming
Speaker
Law Enforcement Against Prohibition
[email protected]
Mohave Valley, AZ
www.leap.cc
LEAP Introduction Video http://www.leap.cc/audiovideo/LEAPpromo.htm

grow your own medicine!!!!!!!!

You know if you just grow your own within the legal limits you would be fine and not subject to high prices on the street.

500 bucks for an ounce?

500 bucks for an ounce? damn, that has to be some quality stuff.

I have THE answer to your problem . . .

You could not be more correct . . . and here is the solution: The "Merp" Project:

The Marijuana Re-Legalization Policy (MRP) Project
http://www.newagecitizen.com/ReLegalization01.htm
http://www.newagecitizen.com/ReLegalization01.htm

Let me know what you think of my proposition. And if it meets your requirements please share the idea with others. This is the change we REALLY need to see right this minute in America.

Yours in Freedom,

Bruce W. Cain
Editor, New Age Citizen
www.newagecitizen.com

I have THE answer to your problem . . .Part 2

There were actually 2 links and I redundantly posted only one of them twice. This is THE solution, so please read about this simple, elegant and "doable" solution.

You could not be more correct . . . and here is the solution: The "Merp" Project:

The Marijuana Re-Legalization Policy (MRP) Project
http://www.newagecitizen.com/ReLegalization01.htm
http://www.newagecitizen.com/editorial_on_the_marijuana_re.htm

Let me know what you think of my proposition. And if it meets your requirements please share the idea with others. This is the change we REALLY need to see right this minute in America.

Yours in Freedom,

Bruce W. Cain
Editor, New Age Citizen
www.newagecitizen.com

LEAP_Speaker's picture

Need more control

Bruce

I agree adults over 18 should be able to grow marijuana, but that can't be all. I’m afraid nothing would change, and who's to stop the 18 year old from selling it to their under age friends? We would still have the black market and kids would still get marijuana far too easy. And where will the 75 year old cancer patient get the medicine they need today, not in 5 months when their plant grows?

I know of no one who grows their own tobacco. Some people will have an interest in growing, but I don't think the majority of people sick or not will want to grow their own marijuana.

We need to somehow regulate sales; otherwise the black marker will simply continue like it has in the California dispensaries. All the government surveys tell us kids can get marijuana easier than alcohol or tobacco.

Why, because alcohol and tobacco are regulated, sellers are licensed and someone checks ID to verify the age of the customer. We know who the sellers are, where they sell, and regulate the age of customers. Today the only one controlling where drugs are sold, to what age group, and where the profits go, is the drug dealer.

To gain the support of the vast majority of people, we need to eliminate the enormous profits created by the black market, and show them how we can keep marijuana from falling into the hands of kids.

The majority of kids who use tobacco or end up with alcohol problems as adults, start using when they’re teens or pre-teens. We need to take some of the law enforcement resources currently wasted on adults, and focus on kids. If we could keep kids from using any substance before the age of 18, they would make far better decisions about their substance use as adults.

Our drug laws today don’t make sense to me. In all states it’s against the law to sell tobacco to anyone under the age of 18, but in most there is no law preventing them from possessintg tobacco once they have it.

When we worked drug cases, we usually didn’t work cases on kids who were selling drugs. Rather than try to help them when they were young, we waited and watched until they turned 18, then we could sent them to prison rather than the juvenile system.

I don’t have all the answers, most days I wonder if I have any. What I do know is the drug war is a failure, we need a national discussion on alternatives to incarceration and the destruction of lives and families.

Drug use is a medical problem, not a law enforcement problem. We tried arresting our way out of this for 30 years and it hasn’t worked, it’s time to look for change.

E. Jay Fleming
Speaker
Law Enforcement Against Prohibition
[email protected]
Mohave Valley, AZ
www.leap.cc
LEAP Introduction Video http://www.leap.cc/audiovideo/LEAPpromo.htm

reply

It's a lot of people getting into this field to make money. I know a former dance hall artist who ownes a couple of these dispensaries and he is making more than he did as an artist I guess he can really take it easy.
And now more individuals are getting into this because they can make way more than working a 9 to 5 job. Hell Pacman Jones should do it since it's so many people doing it.

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