Marijuana Delivery Services: They're Great

But I’m not sure we need newspapers writing about them. The Hartford Courant has a fairly positive take on New York City’s thriving underground marijuana industry. Let’s hope it doesn’t provoke the wrong people.

In a city where you can get just about anything delivered to your door - groceries, dry cleaning, Chinese food - pot smokers are increasingly ordering takeout marijuana from drug rings that operate with remarkable corporate-style attention to customer satisfaction.

An untold number of otherwise law-abiding professionals in New York are having their pot delivered to their homes instead of visiting drug dens or hanging out on street corners.

This enduring business is testament to the fact that marijuana’s popularity reaches far beyond the groups stereotypically associated with it. If you have your own address and can afford inflated prices, you can enjoy marijuana without being exposed to all the horrible outcomes made possible by prohibition.

So it should come as no surprise that the delivery service model is growing in popularity. Frankly, I doubt the authorities have much interest in getting involved, other than to seize a few million in assets here and there. And there’s surely more than a handful of powerful New Yorkers who definitely don’t want anyone interfering with this.

As a reformer, I’m intrigued by what’s been accomplished in New York. The specter of Amsterdam-style coffeeshops is still a bit much for voters, as we saw in Nevada this week. And medical clubs in California have had trouble with neighbors who sometimes can’t get comfortable with the idea of a local club, even if they’re supportive of Prop 215 in principle. Delivery might be the best way to address the needs of marijuana consumers without annoying other people.

We should regulate it.

Location: 
United States
Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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The war on drugs is

The war on drugs is completely useless. Maybe there are a few substances out there that are worthy to get rid of like heroin, crack, meth, etc. But honestly marijuana is not worthy of the billions of dollars spent to crack down on it. There is no major threat from pot smokers except maybe adding business to the already flourishing fast food industry. I do not know one pot smoker that would steal, cause harm, or commit any crimes just for a hit. It's just ridiculous to even think weed is a harmful substance. Us pot smokers are mellow and just looking to be free, not get thrown in prison for a few grams or a roach. Not only should delivery services rise, but the legal issues surrounding marijuana should be dropped. It would definitely help to have a safer setting to buy from rather than some shady Brooklyn street corner.

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