Medical Marijuana: Rhode Island Bill Awaits Expected Veto, Override

A bill that would make Rhode Island's medical marijuana law permanent has passed its final legislative hurdle and is now proceeding to the desk of Gov. Donald Carcieri (R), who vows to veto it. But the measure has passed both houses by margins sufficient to override that threat. If so, it would mark the second time in as many years that the legislature overrode Carcieri's veto of a medical marijuana law.

https://stopthedrugwar.org/files/rhondaodonnell.jpg
leading RI patient activist Rhonda O'Donnell, at DC protest
When passed last year, the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act contained a sunset provision causing the state's program to die June 30 if not re-approved by the legislature. This year's bill actually passed both houses earlier this month, but the final procedural hurdle was cleared when the full House voted this week to pass the Senate version of the bill.

The bill would allow a patient diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition to possess up to 12 marijuana plants and 2.5 ounces of marijuana. A caregiver could have 12 plants and 2.5 ounces of marijuana for each of up to five qualified patients. The state Health Department would register patients and caregivers.

The bill has been pushed by a coalition of medical, legal, and drug reform groups, the Rhode Island Patient Advocacy Coalition. It appears the group is just a veto override vote away from victory.

Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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rhode island

got to love the kind folks of r.i. they are my kind of people

THC is a very potent

THC is a very potent chemical compared to other psychoactive drugs.
An intravenous (IV) dose of only one milligram (mg) can produce serious mental and psychological effects. Once in your bloodstream, THC typically reaches the brain within seconds after it is inhaled and begins to go to work. Neurons are the cells that process information in the brain.
Chemicals called neurotransmitters allow neurons to communicate with each other.
Neurotransmitters fill the gap, or synapse, between two neurons and bind to protein receptors, which enable various functions and allow the brain and body to be turned on and off.
Foreign chemicals, like THC, can mimic or block actions of neurotransmitters and interfere with normal functions.
In your brain, there are groups of cannabinoid receptors concentrated in several different places. These cannabinoid receptors have an effect on several mental and physical activities, including:
Short-term memory
Coordination
Learning
Problem solving

Cannabinoid receptors are activated by a neurotransmitter called anandamide. Anandamide belongs to a group of chemicals called cannabinoids. THC is also a cannabinoid chemical.
THC mimics the actions of anandamide, meaning that THC binds with cannabinoid receptors and activates neurons, which causes adverse effects on the mind and body.
High concentrations of cannabinoid receptors exist in the hippocampus, cerebellum and basal ganglia. The hippocampus is located within the temporal lobe and is important for short-term memory.
When the THC binds with the cannabinoid receptors inside the hippocampus, it interferes with the recollection of recent events.
THC also affects coordination, which is controlled by the cerebellum.
The basal ganglia controls unconscious muscle movements, which is another reason why motor coordination is impaired when under the influence of marijuana.
Marijuana is filled with hundreds of chemicals, and when it is burned, hundreds of additional compounds are produced.
When marijuana is inhaled or ingested in some other form, several short-term effects occur. Some of the marijuana's side effects are:
Problems with memory and learning
Distorted perception
Difficulty with thinking and problem solving
Loss of coordination
Increased heart rate
Anxiety, paranoia and panic attacks
The initial effects created by the THC in marijuana wear off after an hour or two, but the chemicals stay in your body for much longer.
The terminal half-life of THC is from about 20 hours to 10 days, depending on the amount and potency of the marijuana used.
This means that if you take one milligram of THC that has a half-life of 20 hours, you will still have 0.031 mg of THC in your body more than four days later.
Ongoing studies now show a number of possible symptoms associated with the cessation of marijuana use. These symptoms most commonly include: irritability, nervousness, depression, anxiety and even anger.
Other symptoms are restlessness, severe changes in appetite, violent outbursts, interrupted sleep or even insomnia.
In addition to these possible physical effects, psychological dependence usually develops because a person's mind craves the high that it gets when using the drug.

KINDA LIKE CRACK COCAINE EVEN THOUGH POT IS NOT A STIMULANT
Beyond these effects that marijuana has, marijuana smokers are susceptible to the same health problems as tobacco smokers, such as bronchitis, emphysema and bronchial asthma. Other effects include dry-mouth, red eyes, impaired motor skills and impaired concentration.
Long-term use of the drug can increase the risk of damaging the lungs and reproductive system, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). It has also been linked to heart attacks.

Typical THC levels, which determines marijuana potency, range from 0.3 to 4 percent. However, some specially grown plants can contain THC levels as high as 15 percent
During early development, cannabidiolic acid is the most prevalent chemical. Later, cannabidiolic acid is converted to cannabidiol, which is later converted to THC
In 2003, drug law enforcement authorities seized 2.7 million pounds (1.2 million kg)of marijuana from illegal operations. Marijuana is also smuggled into the United States from Mexico, Cambodia and Thailand, among other countries.
Approximately 10 percent to 20 percent of the THC is transferred into the body when smoking a joint
About 40 percent to 50 percent of the THC is transferred into the body when using a pipe.

Tens of thousands of people are now in prison for marijuana offenses. An even greater number are punished with probation, fines, and civil sanctions, including having their property seized, their driver's license revoked, and their employment terminated.
People who are intoxicated constantly, regardless of the drug, are unlikely to be productive members of society.

Among high school students, heavy use is associated with school failure, but school failure usually comes first.
The cognitive process most clearly affected by marijuana is short-term memory.
However, they display diminished capacity to learn and recall new information.

NOW ITS YOUR CHOICE
1 JOINT MIGHT NOT KILL YOU OR ANYONE
BUT ITS NEVER 1 JOINT
ITS NEVER 1 DRINK
ITS NEVER 1 SNORT

AND LOOK AT ALL THE FACTS AT WHAT THEY CAN DO
RESEARCH WHAT ALCOHOL AND SMOKING CIGARETTES DO TO THE BODY AND YOU WILL SEE SIMILARITIES AS WELL AS OTHER DRUGS AND YOU BEGIN TO SEE THE ALTERNATIVES THAT ADDICTS TURN TO WHEN LEAVING 1 DRUG FOR ANOTHER

Kaiser Health researchers have published a study showing that marijuana use is correlated with a significant increase in the risk of hospitalization due to injuries. The study, published in the April 2003 edition of the Annals of Epidemiology, covered 64,657 subjects from Northern California, of whom 13,971 were current marijuana users. Researchers found that among men, current marijuana users had a 28% higher rate of hospitalization due to injuries than non-users; among women, the increase was 37%; namely that accidents are the number one health hazard from marijuana use.

Curiously, men who used marijuana more frequently (>1x per week) had a lower injury rate than those who used it only occasionally (risk ratios 1.36 and 2.00 respectively). For women, risks increased with frequency of use. However, in the case of motor vehicle accidents, frequent use of marijuana (>1x per week) was associated with a greater than two-fold increase in injuries in both men and women (2.47 and 2.18 respectively).

The Kaiser study also found a significantly higher rate of injuries due to assaults in males (risk ratio 1.90), a result which is difficult to explain as due to marijuana impairment. Like other drug users, marijuana users are known to have a higher risk preference than the general population, and may therefore be more likely to find themselves in dangerous situations.

Sure its not a big amount but what if its your friend or neighbor who was the one high while driving that night that hurt or killed one of your family members ?

But if you're behind the wheel and you kill or paralyze my family and I find you

Theres gonna be hell to pay

http://www.iamthewitness.com/DarylBr...eenUpdate.html
STOP THE VIOLENCE FOR THE KIDS

Please stop spamming this site...

Take your reefer madness elsewhere, it has already been shown to be greatly exagerated.

Marijuana is much safer than alcohol and tobacco, even aspirin.

How many marijuana overdoses have there been in the history of all time?

Maybe you should compare the toxicity of over the counter and prescription drugs to the toxicity of marijuana and report back.

I couldnt have said it

I couldnt have said it better myself. When was the last time anyone od'd on marijuana? It only takes a little common sense to answer that question.

you're dumb

you're bashing pot, and i can guarentee you've never had any ailments that pots helped aleviate. you're a fucking comunist. its fuckers like you that ruin this country. pot is not a drug. it's a plant, our forefather would grow it in abundance. theres certain things that happen if this plant gets burned thats all. drugs you have to do something too. only pothead have to worry about memory loss and the munchies thats it. theres no scientific evidence that weed is bad for you. look at the laquardia reports from back in the 20's. he even said theres no ill effects of weed. so go fuck off you prick because if i find you. ill make you paralyzed. fucker.

I really dont see why not

Whomever is against the medical use of marijuana doesnt understand the positive aspects of the uses of the drug. I have Multiple Sclerosis and it seems its the only way I can ease the pain, spasms, and mood swings that come with this disease. If your carefull and discrete with the drug so no kids can get a hold of it then theres nothing to worry about.

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