Latin America: Brazilians Oppose Marijuana Legalization By Wide Margin, Poll Finds

A poll of Brazilian adults conducted by the newspaper Folha de Sao Paulo found that a whopping 79% think marijuana smoking should remain a crime. Only 18% favored legalizing the use of marijuana.

Marijuana, known locally as "maconha," is grown in the Brazilian northeast, as well as being imported from Paraguayan pot plantations. The drug is widely consumed in Brazil, with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimating that roughly two million Brazilians smoked marijuana at least once in the last year.

https://stopthedrugwar.org/files/psicotropicusbanner.jpg
Psicotropicus banner promoting marijuana (maconha) legalization.
There have been calls for liberalization of the country's marijuana laws, not only in annual marijuana marches, but also from some of the country's leading politicians. Last year, Culture Minister (and musician extraordinaire) Gilberto Gil went public with his marijuana use, saying he had smoked it for years. "I believe that drugs should be treated like pharmaceuticals, legalized, although under the same regulations and monitoring as medicines," he said at the time.

But it appears Brazilians are in a conservative mood these days. The poll asked respondents to identify themselves politically and found 47% saying rightist, 23% saying centrist, and 30% saying leftist. The conservative trend was even stronger on criminal justice and moral issues, with 63% opposing abortion, 84% supporting lowering the age at which juveniles can be charged as adults, and 51% supporting the death penalty.

Brazilian observers blamed too much influence from the United States. Former national anti-drug secretary Walter Maierovitch told Folha the results show "a lack of generalized information" among the population. "Brazilians are ill-informed on these polemical matters and generally align themselves with positions that emanate from the United States, where these discussions are more profound and conservative," he told the Folha.

American political scientist David Fleischer, a professor at the University of Brasilia, agreed. "The television is the great source of information for Brazilians," he said. "Cultural imperialism and North American customs, which have become more conservative in the past 20 years, are very relevant."

(Brazilians who want to help change things should join Psicotropicus.)

Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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marijuana should not be legalized, with all we're going thought i dont think it would be good idea.
it will cause more destruction;
and just complicate everything
plus there is that fact that people with die because of drug abuse

Cabinet Minister Joins March to Legalize Pot in Brazil. 2009 GMM

Things are changing rapidly in Brazil.

See this article:

Latin American Herald Tribune. May 10, 2009 article.
http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=334335&CategoryId=14090
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/cannabisaction/message/1490

Cabinet Minister Joins March to Legalize Pot in Brazil

BRASILIA – A Cabinet minister was among those who turned out for marches in support of marijuana legalization in Brazil, joining people in 250 cities across the world in calling for the drug’s decriminalization.

Environment Minister Carlos Minc participated in the protest Saturday in Rio de Janeiro, where nearly 1,200 people marched through Ipanema beach to call for the legalization of pot.

Minc said he was taking part in the demonstration in an unofficial capacity and was merely expressing his opinion as a citizen.

The march in Rio was the largest in the South American country, but protests were also held in the southern city of Porto Alegre, where nearly 500 people took to the streets, and in Brasilia, Belo Horizonte and Juiz de Fora, among other cities.

Protesters criticized rulings by state courts, which banned the marches in several cities on the grounds that they sought to provide a “defense” for illegal drug use.

The marches to press for marijuana legalization were organized over the Internet by groups linked to the World Social Forum.

===end of article===

For more info:
http://cannabis.wikia.com/wiki/Rio_de_Janeiro

only vagabonds want to

only vagabonds want to legalize marijuana

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