Environmental Harm

RSS Feed for this category

European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies' Statement for CND Meeting in Vienna (March 12-16)

Dear delegates, On behalf of the European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies, a platform of more than 150 citizens’ association from around Europe, we wish to ask your attention for the following. Ten years ago, during the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on Drugs in June 1998, in New York, a political declaration was adopted mentioning two important objectives and a target date. In her 1998 declaration, the UN General Assembly committed itself to ‘achieving significant and measurable results in the field of demand reduction’ as well as to ‘eliminating or reducing significantly the illicit cultivation of the coca bush, the cannabis plant and the opium poppy’ by the year 2008. In the mean time the failure of these policies is witnessed every day by citizens, farmers living in coca and opium producing areas in South America and Asia, by people in jails, on dancefloors, in coffeeshops, in user rooms, and the many institutions fed by law enforcement of all kinds. According to figures recently published by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, the annual prevalence of drug use (as percentage of population aged 15 and above) in the USA, the country with the largest investments in demand reduction has shown some increase with regards to ecstasy, opiates and cocaine. The annual prevalence of cocaine use increased from 2.6% in 2000 to 2.8 % in 2004, and we see an even larger increase in the use of cannabis , from 8,3% in 2000 to 12,6 % in 2004. With amphetamine use the same thing: from 0,9% in 2000 to 1,5% in 2004. Drug use and drug production is increasing everywhere, not only in the USA. Considering the global production of illicit drugs, the amount of produced opium has increased from 4.346 tons in 1998 to 4.620 tons in 2005, cocaine has increased from 825 tons in 1998 to 910 tons in 2005 and cannabis from an estimated 30.000 tons in 1998 to 42.000 tons in 2005 (a third of which is produced in North America, making it by far the largest producer of cannabis for its home market). It is obvious that the global efforts to ‘eliminate or significantly reduce drugs demand and supply’ before the 2008 deadline have not been successful. But,these efforts have caused considerable and increasing damage to human rights, public health, environment, the economy, sustainable development, the state of law and the relation between citizens and authorities across the world. In a year from now, you will have to take an important decision. Will you ignore the past? Will you continue going the same destructive but largely ineffective road? When you meet here in this room in March 2008, you need to have some sort of a story! Your government or organisation needs to present its conclusions of the past 10 years, as well as its recommendations for the future. Essentially you have two possibilities. You can either choose to ignore the evidence, and continue on this cruel, costly, ineffective and counterproductive affair called the War on Drugs. Or you can start to discuss how to introduce reflection and common sense, and start to modify our petrified international drug legislation in such a way as to allow countries to start with drug policies that will be more effective in reducing the many harms of drug policy. Reducing the harms of drug use itself is a relatively small affair comparing it to reducing drug policy related harms. Together with many others, ENCOD sees prohibition related harms as many times more extensive , pervasive and destructive than drug related harms. Global drug policy shows confusing elements. On the one hand, hundreds of millions of people around the world are a victim of drug policies. People are now killed, tortured, imprisoned, stigmatised and ruined for growing, trading or consuming substances that have accompanied mankind for thousands of years. Even those who practice public health types of harm reduction in the drug field are criminalised in certain areas of the world. On the other hand, ‘harm reduction’ has been embraced by many local and regional authorities as an effective approach to the most urgent health problems related to drug use. Harm reduction measures depart from the principle that health and safety are more important than moral judgements, but are seriously jeopardized by the burocratic frame work that manages and interprets the UN Treaties. In most European countries, the possession of small quantities of cannabis is no longer considered an offence. In countries where the distribution of cannabis for personal use is depenalised, such as the Netherlands, local authorities are increasingly in favour of organise a transparant circuit of cannabis cultivation, distribution and consumption by adults. Those authorities have started to understand that regulation is a way to reduce criminality and health problems, not blind prohibition. The government of Bolivia calls for the international depenalisation of the coca leaf as a way to recognise the great nutritional, medicinal and cultural value of coca. In fact, Bolivia would have the right to repeal the UN Convention of 1961, as the prohibition of coca leaves that is included in that Convention is not based on scientific evidence. Allowing the export of tea and other benefitial coca derivates would help to substitute the dependence of coca farmers of the illegal sector with a sustainable economy based on renewable agricultural resources. Likewise, the depenalisation of opium cultivation, allowing the use of this substance for the already existing legal purposes, could become an important option to increase living standards and human rights of people in Afghanistan, Burma and other countries. Will Vienna 2008 mark the start of a different era in drug policy? We doubt it. What is needed is the creation of the legal and political space for local, regional and national authorities to apply policies that are not based on total prohibition. However we see and deplore that the system of drug control -expanded and enlarged since 1910- has become a phenomenal and counterproductive obstacle in the way of innovation and harm reduction. The UN Conventions do not allow for any development and force upon the world an obsolete system of worldwide Prohibition that for alcohol has long been abandoned. Any regime change, however small, needs cooperation of almost 200 countries! This way the world has imprisoned itself inside this system, and thrown away the key. Will Vienna 2008 be an opportunity for all those who wish to find a sensible solution to drug related problems ? Will Vienna 2008 start to end the massive damage done by drug policies, damage that is many times larger than any damage even intense drug use itself ever created? We will be here again in one year. Best wishes, On behalf of ENCOD, Christine Kluge, Germany Marina Impallomeni, Italy Virginia Montañes, Spain Farid Ghehioeuche, France Jan van der Tas, Netherlands Joep Oomen, Belgium
Location: 
United States

Op-Ed: Meth trade not gone, just evolving

Location: 
WA
United States
Publication/Source: 
The News Tribune (WA)
URL: 
http://www.thenewstribune.com/opinion/story/6378455p-5689408c.html

Meth battle sees new fronts

Location: 
WA
United States
Publication/Source: 
The News Tribune (WA)
URL: 
http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/crime/story/6375741p-5687279c.html

Laws change way users get their drug of choice

Location: 
WA
United States
Publication/Source: 
Tri-City Herald (WA)
URL: 
http://www.tri-cityherald.com/tch/local/story/8651301p-8543088c.html

GOP lawmakers press Bush on Afghanistan

Location: 
Washington, DC
United States
Publication/Source: 
Los Angeles Times
URL: 
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-drugwar7feb07,1,6836767.story?coll=la-headlines-world

Afghan government won't spray poppies

Location: 
Kabul
Afghanistan
Publication/Source: 
Canadian Press
URL: 
http://www.canada.com/topics/news/world/story.html?id=1e00c9cb-4e8a-4cfc-b72f-9ae140579008&k=41498

Ecuador, Colombia Bad Start in 2007

Location: 
Quito
Ecuador
Publication/Source: 
Prensa Latina (Cuba)
URL: 
http://www.plenglish.com/article.asp?ID=%7B711550CF-36A6-416B-B437-714E8D535F41%7D)&language=EN

Chávez Backs Ecuador in Attacking U.S. Drug War

Location: 
Caracas
Venezuela
Publication/Source: 
The New York Times
URL: 
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/21/world/americas/21venez.html?ref=americas

Methamphetamine: DEA to Create National Lab Site Registry

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) announced in a press release last week that it will post the locations of known clandestine meth labs or dump sites across the country. The free public service will help people be aware of possible meth-contaminated sites in their communities, the agency said.

https://stopthedrugwar.org/files/methlab4.jpg
meth lab
While a handful of states have adopted meth registries, the move by the DEA marks the first national listing of former meth lab sites. The web site will contain addresses reported by state and local law enforcement where chemicals or other items related to meth production were found or dumped. The DEA warns that the list "may not be comprehensive."

"In a cruel twist of fate, people who have never used or manufactured meth have become some of its hardest hit victims after unknowingly buying property contaminated by chemicals and waste generated from a meth lab," said DEA Administrator Karen Tandy. "This registry gives home owners a new tool to help them ensure that their dream house is not a hidden nightmare."

[Ed: It's not a "cruel twist of fate," it's a cruel but predictable consequence of drug prohibition."]

Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) Action Network Alert: Congress to Vote on Poisoning People

From our friends at Drug Policy Alliance: Congress to Vote on Poisoning People This Week Earlier this year we warned you about a bill in Congress that would revive controversial research on the use of toxic, mold-like fungi called mycoherbicides to kill illicit drug crops in other countries. This provision could unleash an environmental disaster of monumental proportions. But Congressman Mark Souder and Senators Hatch and Biden are rushing it to the House and Senate floors this week. Here are three things you can do: 1) Call your two U.S. Senators and one U.S. Representative today or tomorrow. If you don't know who they are, simply call the Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and give them your address. They'll connect you directly with their offices. You can also look them up online at the Senate website and the House website. When you get a staffer on the phone, politely say something like: "My name is [your name] and I live in [your city]. I'm calling to urge [the Senator or Representative] to oppose the ONDCP Reauthorization bill if it comes to the floor this week, especially its mycoherbicide provision. Please let me know how [the Senator/Representative] votes." If they ask, the mycoherbicide section is Section 1111. The bill being brought to the floor is a combination of a House and Senate bill, so it doesn't have a bill number yet. It will be brought to the Senate floor under a unanimous consent agreement and to the House floor under suspension of the rules--both of which limit debate. 2) Phone calls are the most effective way of stopping this bill. But if you don't feel comfortable making calls or you don't have the time, we urge you to fax or e-mail your elected officials instead. Contact your two Senators through the Senate website and your one Representative through the House website. 3) Please forward this alert to everyone you know. Unless thousands of Americans contact Congress, this bill could pass by the end of this week. Sincerely, Bill Piper Drug Policy Alliance Network More Information Mycoherbicides have already been extensively studied over the last thirty years--and the results make it clear that they are not an option for controlling crops of coca or opium poppies. They attack indiscriminately, destroying fruit and vegetable crops, and sickening animals and humans as well. The toxins mycoherbicides produce contaminate soil for years, so that nothing can grow where they have been. Mycoherbicides are so destructive that governments have even stockpiled them as weapons! Incredibly, the proposal now before Congress advocates using mycoherbicides in "field studies" in countries such as Colombia and Afghanistan--something the world would certainly see as an act of biological warfare. Office of National Drug Control Policy head John Walters spoke out against further mycoherbicide research last year, but this terrible proposal is now part of the ONDCP Reauthorization Act. Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act, the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy shall submit to the Congress a report that includes a plan to conduct, on an expedited basis, a scientific study of the use of mycoherbicide as a means of illicit drug crop elimination by an appropriate Government scientific research entity, include a complete and thorough scientific peer review. The study shall include an evaluation of the likely human health and environmental impacts of mycoherbicides derived from fungus naturally existing in the soil. Contact the Drug Policy Alliance Network: Drug Policy Alliance Network 70 West 36th Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10018
Location: 
United States

Drug War Issues

Criminal JusticeAsset Forfeiture, Collateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Court Rulings, Drug Courts, Due Process, Felony Disenfranchisement, Incarceration, Policing (2011 Drug War Killings, 2012 Drug War Killings, 2013 Drug War Killings, 2014 Drug War Killings, 2015 Drug War Killings, 2016 Drug War Killings, 2017 Drug War Killings, Arrests, Eradication, Informants, Interdiction, Lowest Priority Policies, Police Corruption, Police Raids, Profiling, Search and Seizure, SWAT/Paramilitarization, Task Forces, Undercover Work), Probation or Parole, Prosecution, Reentry/Rehabilitation, Sentencing (Alternatives to Incarceration, Clemency and Pardon, Crack/Powder Cocaine Disparity, Death Penalty, Decriminalization, Defelonization, Drug Free Zones, Mandatory Minimums, Rockefeller Drug Laws, Sentencing Guidelines)CultureArt, Celebrities, Counter-Culture, Music, Poetry/Literature, Television, TheaterDrug UseParaphernalia, ViolenceIntersecting IssuesCollateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Violence, Border, Budgets/Taxes/Economics, Business, Civil Rights, Driving, Economics, Education (College Aid), Employment, Environment, Families, Free Speech, Gun Policy, Human Rights, Immigration, Militarization, Money Laundering, Pregnancy, Privacy (Search and Seizure, Drug Testing), Race, Religion, Science, Sports, Women's IssuesMarijuana PolicyGateway Theory, Hemp, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Marijuana Industry, Medical MarijuanaMedicineMedical Marijuana, Science of Drugs, Under-treatment of PainPublic HealthAddiction, Addiction Treatment (Science of Drugs), Drug Education, Drug Prevention, Drug-Related AIDS/HIV or Hepatitis C, Harm Reduction (Methadone & Other Opiate Maintenance, Needle Exchange, Overdose Prevention, Pill Testing, Safer Injection Sites)Source and Transit CountriesAndean Drug War, Coca, Hashish, Mexican Drug War, Opium ProductionSpecific DrugsAlcohol, Ayahuasca, Cocaine (Crack Cocaine), Ecstasy, Heroin, Ibogaine, ketamine, Khat, Kratom, Marijuana (Gateway Theory, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Medical Marijuana, Hashish), Methamphetamine, New Synthetic Drugs (Synthetic Cannabinoids, Synthetic Stimulants), Nicotine, Prescription Opiates (Fentanyl, Oxycontin), Psilocybin / Magic Mushrooms, Psychedelics (LSD, Mescaline, Peyote, Salvia Divinorum)YouthGrade School, Post-Secondary School, Raves, Secondary School