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This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

It's a New York-New Jersey special edition! The Troy Police drug unit is under investigation, an NYPD officer gets popped for transporting drugs for money, a New Jersey cop gets caught with his hand in the pill jar, and more. Let's get to it:

In Troy, New York, the entire Troy Police drug unit was under investigation as of last Friday for trying to cover up a raid where members entered a home without a search warrant. Members of the unit filed a false burglary report to try to justify their warrantless entry resulting in a "fractious argument" among them. Now, all six officers in Firearms Interdiction and Narcotics Suppression (FINS) unit have been suspended pending the results of an internal investigation.

In Bridgeton, New Jersey, a Vineland police officer was arrested last Wednesday after allegedly pilfering drugs from a prescription drug drop-off box while on duty at police headquarters. Officer Richard Janasiak, 30, went down after an internal audit uncovered possible criminal activity. He is charged with unlawful possession of prescription legend drugs.

In New York City, an NYPD officer was arrested last Thursday for transporting marijuana and cocaine in exchange for money. Officer Nysia Stroud, 29, agreed to transport drugs after meeting with an undercover police officer in March and became transporting large quantities of supposed marijuana and cocaine for payments ranging from $250 to $1,000. Stroud was under investigation after Internal Affairs received allegations she was involved in drug activity. She was charged with possession of a controlled substance and official misconduct.

In Elizabeth, New Jersey, a former Middlesex County probation officer was sentenced last Friday to three years in prison for taking bribes from a man so he could avoid court-ordered drug tests. Rhonda Battle, 48, repeatedly accepted bribes from the probationer to allow him to skip drug testing while in the drug court program. After being caught on surveillance video taking money from the man, Battle pleaded guilty in April to a single count of official misconduct.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

It's pretty quiet on the corrupt cop front week, except for one drug-gobbling Tennessee cop and Burritogate in Tulsa. Let's get to it:

In Ripley, Tennessee, a former Ripley police officer was sentenced last Friday to four years' probation after turning up as a suspect in an undercover drug investigation. Stephen Michael Kirkpatrick wasn't the intended target, but information developed in the investigation led to him being charged on numerous counts. He pleaded guilty to two counts of official misconduct, 13 counts of cocaine possession, one count of marijuana possession, one count of meth possession, and one count of misuse of official information.

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, a Tulsa County jail guard was arrested last Friday after deputies found drugs hidden inside a burrito he brought into the jail. Guard Kevin Mayo, 20, went down after the burrito turned out to be filled with marijuana, methamphetamine, and prescription pain pill. He is charged with possession of contraband in a jail, conspiracy to commit a felony, possession of both marijuana and methamphetamine, possession of a schedule II drug, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is now on unpaid leave and in jail.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A North Dakota sheriff was letting meth suborn him, a Florida sheriff's deputy was tweaked on steroids, and more. Let's get to it:

In Fessenden, North Dakota, the former Wells County sheriff was arrested last Tuesday on bribery and methamphetamine charges. Johnny Zip Lawson, 41, is accused of consuming meth provided by a local man in exchange for not investigating break-ins and burglaries in the area that may have been committed by that man. He is charged with conspiracy to deliver a controlled substance, methamphetamine, a Class A felony, and bribery-unlawful influence of public servants, a Class C felony. He was also charged with three Class A misdemeanors: providing false information to a law enforcement officer, neglect of duty and ingesting a controlled substance, methamphetamine.

In Bridgeport, Connecticut, a Fairfield police detective was arrested last Friday for allegedly stealing thousands of dollars' worth of heroin and Oxycontin from the department's evidence room. Detective Stephen Rilling, 40, is accused of signing out heroin, Oxycontin, and cocaine for "testing," but consuming the drugs himself. He is charged with third-degree computer crime, second-degree larceny by defrauding a public community, possession of narcotics, second-degree forgery, tampering with evidence and false entry by an officer or agent of a public community.

In Daytona Beach, Florida, a Volusia County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Friday on accusations that he stole money and a synthetic steroid from a driver during a traffic stop. John Braman, 24, went down after body-camera video showed him taking money out of the driver's wallet. Prosecutors said body camera video showed at least two more cases of Braman ripping off motorists and that investigators found steroids and syringes in Braman's car. He is charged with theft, official misconduct, and possession of a controlled substance.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A Connecticut top narc gets nailed for stealing dope, an NYPD officer get nailed for peddling dope, a Hawaii cop gets a wrist-slap for "promoting" dope, and more. Let's get to it:

In New Orleans, an Orleans Parish sheriff's jail employee was arrested last Thursday after she was caught in the act smuggling heroin and other drugs into the parish jail. Ciboney Parker, 23, went down after jail authorities recorded phone calls made between her, an inmate, and the inmate's girlfriend setting up a delivery. She got popped when she showed up at work with the drugs. She is now charged with possession with intent to distribute heroin, possession of schedule IV drugs (tramadol) and bringing contraband into a correctional facility.

In New York City, an NYPD officer was arrested last Thursday for allegedly peddling drugs on the street in Queens while off duty. Officer Jose Sierra got popped for selling drugs to a man on 111th Street in Corona. He is a five-year veteran of the force.

In Fairfield, Connecticut, the Fairfield Police Department's lead narcotics detective was arrested last Friday on charges he stole heroin and other drugs seized during police operations. Detective Steven Rilling, 40, is charged with third-degree computer crime, second-degree larceny, second-degree forgery, possession of narcotics, false entry by an officer or agent of a public community and tampering with evidence. Rilling only stole drugs from cases in which he was involved, police said.

In Honolulu, a former Honolulu police officer was sentenced Tuesday to 60 days in jail on multiple drug charges. Alan Ahn got into trouble when police raided his girlfriend's house after undercover officers bought drugs there. While he was looking at up to years, he copped a plea, admitting to "promotion" of cocaine, marijuana, and painkillers. He must also do four years' probation.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

The former Fresno deputy police chief is headed for federal prison, a former North Carolina cop is headed there, too, for running armed escorts for supposed traffickers, and more. Let's get to it:

In Evansville, Indiana, a Vanderburgh County jail guard was arrested Monday on charges he was supplying tobacco and Ritalin to inmates. Trent Nolan, 24, went down after authorities were tipped off and set up a controlled buy for Ritalin with him. He is charged with dealing in a scheduled substance and trafficking with an inmate.

In Saginaw, Michigan, a former Saginaw County Jail guard was arrested Monday for allegedly removing evidence discovered after a man was booked into the jail on drug charges. He is charged with one felony count of evidence tampering and is looking at up to four years in state prison.

In Washington, North Carolina, a former Windsor police officer was found guilty Monday on charges he provided armed support to drug traffickers. Antonio Tillman, 33, went down during an investigation into "systematic law enforcement corruption" in Northampton County after he accepted $6,500 from undercover FBI agents posing as traffickers to escort shipments of 30 pounds of heroin from North Carolina to Maryland. He was convicted of multiple counts of conspiring to distribute controlled substances, attempting to possess with intent to distribute controlled substances, conspiring to use and carry firearms in relation to drug trafficking offenses, using and carrying firearms in relation to drug trafficking offenses and federal programs bribery. He is set for sentencing in August.

In Fresno, California, the former deputy police chief was convicted Tuesday on federal drug trafficking charges. Keith Foster, 53, went down after being recorded talking about buying drugs and being surveilled by FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms agents. He was convicted of two charges -- conspiracy to distribute heroin and conspiracy to distribute marijuana -- but acquitted on six other counts. He's looking at up to 20 years in prison.

Chronicle AM: Drug Policies Fueling Hep C Rise, MI Init Begins Signature Drive, More... (5/19/17)

The CDC issues a damning report about drug policy and Hep C, the clock is ticking on the Vermont legalization bill as the governor ponders his choices, Michigan legalizers hit the streets with petitions for 2018, and more.

State-level policies toward injection drug users can influence Hep C rates -- for better or worse. (Wikimedia)
Marijuana Policy

Michigan Legalization Initiative Signature Gathering Gets Underway. The state Board of Canvassers Thursday gave its go-ahead for the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol to begin signature gathering for its marijuana legalization initiative, and the group immediately sent canvassers onto the streets. The measure would legalize up to 2.5 ounces and 12 plants for adults and create a system of legal marijuana commerce. The campaign needs a little more than 252,000 valid voter signatures within six months to qualify for the November 2018 ballot.

Texas Poll Has Majority Support for Legalization. A new University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll has a slight majority for marijuana legalization, with 32% saying small amounts should be legalized and 21% saying any amount should be legalized. That's 53% for some form of legalization. Some 30% said only medical marijuana should be legal, while only 17% said no form of marijuana should be legal.

Vermont Clock Ticking on Legalization Bill -- Governor Has Five Days to Veto or Not. The state legislature sent the legalization bill it approved -- Senate Bill 22 -- to Gov. Phil Scott (R) on Thursday. Under state law, he has five days to sign or veto the bill. If he fails to act, the bill becomes law without his signature. He is facing heavy pressures on all sides. Stay tuned.

Drug Policy

High Hep C Rates Linked to Drug Policy Failures. A report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 17 states had high rates of Hep C because they lacked laws and Medicaid policies to prevent drug users from being infected with the disease or obtaining treatment once they did. Seven of those states had a Hep C rate more than twice the national average, and all the others also had above average rates. The report said the states needed to focus more on reducing intravenous drug users' Hep C risk by enacting laws such as allowing pharmacies to sell syringes to the public and by enacting Medicaid policies that do not require patients to be drug free for a certain people before getting treatment. "It is important for policy makers and public health officials to work together to understand the various needs of particular populations to prevent HCV transmission and disease," the report concluded.

International

Trump-Santos Meeting Shows Divergence on Drug Policy. As President Trump and Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos addressed reporters at a White House press conference Thursday, clear drug policy differences emerged. While Trump emphasized "building the wall," or an interdiction-based strategy, Santos declined to endorse that strategy, explaining that drug policy is a complex international issue that requires innovation and collaboration. "We declared the war on drugs 40 years ago -- the world declared the war on drugs -- and it's a war that has not been won. We must be more effective and more efficient," Santos said.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

California sheriff's deputies are having a hard time resisting temptation, a guard at Louisiana's Angola prison gets caught with a smorgasbord of drugs, and more. Let's get to it:

In New York City, a city jail guard was arrested last Wednesday along with 13 others for dealing drugs at a Brooklyn housing project. Guard Cammi Ortiz, 26, was found with two bags of crack and marijuana, along with two scales for weighing the drugs. The precise charges she faces are unclear.

In St. Francisville, Louisiana, an Angola state prison guard was arrested last Saturday after a "routine shakedown" turned up drugs in her car while parked at the prison. Guard April Matthews, 23, got caught with 24 ecstasy tablets, 2.6 ounces of marijuana, 9 ounces of synthetic marijuana, 8 Xanax pills, 5 grams of methamphetamine, 16 cell phones, phone chargers, tobacco, rolling papers, and more than $500 in cash. She is charged with introduction of contraband into a penal institution, malfeasance in office, one count of possession of schedule IV narcotics, and two counts of possession of schedule I narcotics.

In York, Pennsylvania, a former Yuba County, California, sheriff's deputy was found guilty last Wednesday of trafficking hundreds of pounds of marijuana to Pennsylvania. Christopher Heath, 38, went down after he and two others were caught with 250 pounds of pot. His co-defendants all pleaded guilty, and now Heath, too, has been found guilty. He was convicted of possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking, conspiracy to manufacture and distribute 100 kilograms of marijuana and conspiracy to launder drug proceed.

In Bakersfield, California, two former Kern County sheriff's deputies pleaded guilty Monday to stealing seized marijuana from the department's storage unit and selling it. Derrick Penney, 34, and Logan August, 30, admitted conspiring with a former Bakersfield police detective and others to steal the weed and turn it over to a former snitch to sell it. The deputies got $1,200 each for their efforts. August also admitted separately stealing about 25 pounds of pot and letting the same snitch sell it, for which he received $15,000. Both men pleaded guilty to conspiracy to traffic marijuana.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

There's trouble in Hackensack, a pair of California cops admit stealing eradicated weed and reselling it, a Seattle cop gets nailed for hauling weed across the country, a Texas cop gets nailed for pilfering cocaine, and more. Let's get to it:

In Hackensack, New Jersey, all six members of the Hackensack Police Narcotics Division were suspended Tuesday pending the outcome of an administrative investigation. The unit commander, his second in command, two detectives, and two patrol officers were all suspended. The investigation is being conducted with help from the Bergen County Prosecutor's Office. Stay tuned.

In San Juan, Texas, a San Juan police officer was arrested last Friday after allegedly taking cocaine from a traffic accident instead of turning it in. Officer Salvador Gonzalez went down after he and Border Patrol agents responded to accident and found an abandoned vehicle with two duffle bags of drug inside. Hernandez delivered 37 bundles of cocaine to the police department, but kept three for himself. He is charged with possession with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine.

In Seattle, a Seattle police officer was arrested last Saturday on charges he helped smuggle hundreds of pounds of marijuana to Baltimore. Officer Alex Chapackdee, 44, is accused of repeatedly driving his recreational vehicle across the country filled with marijuana and then back to Seattle with large amounts of cash. He is charged with conspiracy to distribute marijuana.

In Bakersfield, California, two former Kern County sheriff's deputies pleaded guilty last Thursday to a drug-selling scheme while members of the force. Logan August and Derrick Penney admitted working with two former Bakersfield police officers who have already been jailed in the scheme, which involved taking marijuana seized in eradication operations and reselling it. They have now pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana. The two each face five years in prison, a fine of $250,000, a minimum two-year period of supervised release and a maximum lifetime period of supervised release.

In Tucson, Arizona, a former Pima County sheriff's office chief deputy was sentenced last Friday to a year's probation after pleading guilty to illegally using money seized from drug suspects. Former Chief Deputy Christopher Radtke improperly used money seized through the asset forfeiture program for expenses including $600 for two model airplanes and a payment to an artist to create a menu board for a restaurant within the sheriff's department. As part of his plea agreement, Radtke described how the department had for 18 years laundered forfeiture funds to get around restrictions on how they were used. Radtke became involved six years ago. He was originally charged with six felony counts of theft concerning programs receiving federal funds and conspiracy to launder monetary instruments, but plea bargained down to three misdemeanor counts of theft of public funds.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

It's jail guards gone wild this week! Let's get to it:

In Goose Creek, South Carolina, a Goose Creek jail guard was sentenced Tuesday to eight months in federal prison for smuggling drugs into the jail. Adam Jason Spindler, 33, had pleaded guilty in August to one count each of drug conspiracy and possession of controlled substances with the intent to distribute. He went down after a search as he entered the jail turned up heroin and marijuana. He later admitted he intended to sell the drugs.

In Lafayette, Louisiana, a Lafayette Parish jail deputy was arrested Monday on charges he intended to smuggle drugs into the jail. Deputy Jonathan Fremin, 52, is accused of obtaining suboxone without a prescription for himself and an inmate. He is charged with malfeasance in office, criminal conspiracy to introduce contraband into a penal facility and possession with intent to distribute Schedule III narcotics.

In Cleveland, Ohio, a Cuyahoga County jail guard was arrested Saturday for peddling dope. Brian Salters, 39, went down not at work, but after being caught slinging drugs near a liquor store on Shaw Avenue. Vice officers saw him sell marijuana to one man, then detained him and searched his car, where they found an unloaded gun, a box of ammunition, 28 bags of marijuana, four bags of crack cocaine, two bags of heroin, two bags of ecstasy pills, and a pill bottle with 20 unidentified pills in a Pringles can that had heroin residue inside, according to police reports. At last report, Salter was still in jail and the precise charges had not been announced.

Not One Step Back: Drug Policy Reformers and African American Academics Convene in the South

This article was published in collaboration with Alternet and first appeared here.

Hundreds of members of the Atlanta community and dozens of the nation's leading advocates for drug policy reform gathered in a groundbreaking meeting over the weekend. The meeting aimed at building alliances with the African American community to both advance smart public health approaches to drug policy and maintain and protect existing reforms in the face of hostile powers in Washington.

Dr. Marc Lamont Hill, Rep. Maxine Waters, asha bandele
Sponsored by the Drug Policy Alliance, Georgia State University's Department of African American Studies, the Morehouse School of Medicine, Amnesty International, The Ordinary People's Society, the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, and Peachtree NORML, "Not One Step Back" marked the first time the drug reform movement has come to the historically black colleges of the South and signals the emergence of a powerful new alliance between black academics and reform advocates.

The event included a series of panels filled with activists, academics, and public health experts, including Black Lives Matter cofounder Patrice Cullors and VH1 personality and best-selling author Dr. Marc Lamont Hill, and was highlighted by a keynote address by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA).

To the delight of the audience, "Auntie Maxine" slammed the drug war as aimed only at certain communities while those making fortunes at the top of the illegal drug trade go untouched. The representative from South Central reached back to the days of the crack cocaine boom to make her case.

"The police did everything you think wouldn't happen in a democracy," she said, citing illegal raids and thuggish behavior from the LAPD of then-Chief Darryl Gates, the inventor of the SWAT team. But if low-level users and dealers were getting hammered, others involved went scot free.

"Something happened to devastate our communities," she said, alluding to the arrival of massive amounts of cocaine flowing from political allies of the Reagan administration as it waged war against the Sandinista government of Nicaragua. "The CIA and DEA turned a blind eye," Waters argued. "If you're the CIA and DEA, you know who the dealer is, but they take the lower-level dealers and let the big dealers keep selling drugs."

"Ricky Ross did time," she said, referencing the South Central dealer held responsible for unleashing the crack epidemic (with the help of Nicaraguan Contra connections). "But those big banks that laundered all that drug money -- nobody got locked up, they just have to pay fines. But for them, fines are just a cost of doing business. Even today, some of the biggest banks are laundering money for drug dealers," Waters noted.

"We have to defend our communities; we don't support drugs and addiction, but you need to know that people in high places bear some responsibility. One of the worst things about the drug war is that we never really dealt with how these drugs come into our communities," Waters added.

The selection of Atlanta for the conclave was no accident. Georgia is a state that incarcerates blacks for drug offenses at twice the rate it does whites. While blacks make up only a third of the state's population, they account for three-quarters of those behind bars for marijuana offenses.

The state has the nation's fourth-highest incarceration rate, with a prison population on track to grow 8% within the next five years, and one out of every 13 adults in the state are in prison or jail or on probation or parole.

Atlanta is also the powerhouse of the South -- the region's largest city, and one that is increasingly progressive in a long-time red state that could now be turning purple. And it is the site of the Drug Policy Alliance's International Drug Policy Reform Conference -- the world's premier drug reform gathering -- set for October. What better place to bring a laser focus on the racial injustice of the drug war?

"The drug war is coded language," said Drug Policy Alliance senior director asha bandele. "When the law no longer allowed the control and containment of people based on race, they inserted the word 'drug' and then targeted communities of color. Fifty years later, we see the outcome of that war. Drug use remains the same, and black people and people of color are disproportionately locked up. But no community, regardless of race, has been left unharmed, which is why we are calling everyone together to strategize."

And strategize they did, with panels such as "Drug Reform is a Human Rights Issue," "This is What the Drug War Looks Like: Survivors Speak," "Strength, Courage, and Wisdom: Who We Must Be in These Times," and "Dreaming a World: A Nation Beyond Prisons and Punishment."

While denunciations of white privilege were to be expected, the accompanying arguments that capitalism plays a role in perpetuating oppression and inequality was surprisingly frank.

"We have to dismantle both white supremacy and capitalism," said Eunisses Hernandez, a California-based program coordinator for the Drug Policy Alliance. "We need to reach a place where trauma is dealt with in a public health model. The current system of law enforcement, prisons, and jails doesn't do anything for us."

"We're in agreement here," said Dr. Hill. "We have to eliminate white supremacy and capitalism."

That's not something you hear much in mainstream political discourse, but in Atlanta, under the impetus of addressing the horrors of the war on drugs, the search for answers is leading to some very serious questions -- questions that go well beyond the ambit of mere drug reform. Something was brewing in Atlanta this weekend. Whether the initial progress will be built upon remains to be seen, but the drug reformers are going to be back in October to try to strengthen and deepen those new-found bonds.

Atlanta, GA
United States

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