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Press Release: First Global Conference on Methamphetamine to Convene in Prague

Press Release Contact: Luciano Colonna

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 2008 Global Conference On Methamphetamine

Wednesday, June 4, 2008 Chair, Executive Program Committee

+00 (1) 801 635 7736 (USA / MTD, HAR; UTC – 6 hours)

[email protected]

FIRST GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON METHAMPHETAMINE TO CONVENE IN PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC, ON SEPTEMBER 15-16, 2008

Experts in Science, Public Health, Government, Drug Policy, Treatment, Prevention, Law Enforcement, and the Private Sector Will Meet to Examine the Intersection between Methamphetamine, Public Health, Law Enforcement, and Civil Society.

PRAGUE, Czech Republic, June 4 ­­­­-- As the use of methamphetamine and other amphetamine-type stimulants proliferates across the globe, there is an emerging consensus among experts that methamphetamine use is a unique and complex problem that presents a significant challenge to existing philosophies and strategies. The First Global Conference on Methamphetamine will provide an arena for the world’s foremost scientists, leaders and professionals working on issues of drug use to come together to discuss a wide variety of topics centering around methamphetamine. The Conference will take place in Prague’s Historic City Hall on September 15 – 16 (Monday & Tuesday), 2008.

As the first event to gather global experts from a wide diversity of fields, the conference is assured to be an unparalleled event. Confirmed speakers from USA, China, Australia, Thailand, Russia, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, New Zealand, Indonesia, Poland, Iran, Serbia, Ukraine, Czech Republic, Great Britain and the United Nations will address the conference theme of “Science, Strategy and Response.” Representatives from international agencies, civil society, academia, science, law enforcement and others will have the unique opportunity to discuss key issues including: Treatment, HIV, Trafficking, Production, Environmental Impact, Law Enforcement, Policy, Current Research, Regional Updates, and Innovative Global Approaches.

According to estimates by the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the World Health Organization (WHO): More individuals worldwide now use stimulants than opiates and cocaine combined. Methamphetamine is the most widely used illicit drug in the world except for cannabis. Over 26 million individuals used amphetamine-type stimulants in 2006.

Established trends show methamphetamine use to be widespread in North American, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand; while India, Pakistan, Eastern Europe, the Russian Federation Sub-Saharan Africa and Western Europe represent emerging markets or areas of perceived risk. Yet the development of appropriate and effective responses to stimulants lags. In most cases, treatment and prevention are inappropriately modeled on opiate and alcohol treatment, ignoring both the physical properties of the drug itself, and the fact that methamphetamine use patterns vary widely, and effective responses must be tailored to the unique needs of regions, cultures, and individual users. A lack of infrastructure, of funding, and of experts trained specifically in methamphetamine response compounds the problem.

As nations struggle to develop appropriate responses to methamphetamine, it is crucial that the most current scientific research, information, and best practices be available to those seeking to implement solutions. The primary goal of the First Global Conference on Methamphetamine is to provide a context for this important work to take place.

Featured Speakers Will Include:

- Apinun Aramrattana, MD, PhD, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai

- Jeremy Douglas. Manager, Global SMART Program, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Vienna

- Ahmed Elkashef, M.D. Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences, NIDA, Washington, D.C.

- Carl Hart, PhD, Professor, Neuroscience Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York

- Evgeny Krupitsky, MD, PhD, Prof., Bekhterev Research Psychoneurological Institute, St. Petersburg

- Prof. Lin Lu, MD, PhD, Director, National Institute of Drugs and Development, Beijing

- Donald Rothenbaum, Senior Vice President, Network Environmental Systems, San Diego

- Kasia Malinowska-Sempruch, MSW, Director, Open Society's Institute's Global Drug Policy Program, Warsaw

- Azarakhsh Mokri, MD, Iranian Nation Center for Addiction Studies, Tehran

- Ethan Nadelmann, JD, Executive Director, Drug Policy Alliance, New York

- Caitlin Padgett, Coordinator and Founder of Youth R.I.S.E., Vancouver

- Andreas Plüddemann, Senior Scientist, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Research Unit Medical, Cape Town

- Richard Rawson, PhD, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Los Angeles

- Michael Siever, PhD, Director of The Stonewall Project, San Francisco

- Pavlo Smyrnov, MPH., Deputy Executive Director, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, Kiev

- Alex Wodak, MD, Director, Alcohol and Drug Services Vincent's Hospital, Sydney

- Chris Wilkins, PhD, Senior Researcher & Drugs Team Leader at SHORE/Whariki, Massey University, Auckland - Gady Zabicky, MD, Centro Nacional para la Prevención y Control del VIH/SIDA, Mexico City - Tomas Zabransky, MD, PhD, R and D Manager, Centre for Addictology, Charles University, Prague

FOR MEDIA: The major sessions of the conference are open to reporters. Site visits, photo opportunities and interviews can be arranged. For journalists not traveling to Prague, interviews and briefings with key spokespeople and presenters can be arranged on request.

Sponsors and Partners include: The Czech Republic, Charles University, the City of Prague, Network Environmental Systems, Podane Ruce, Cranstoun Drug Services, Sananim, Institute Scan, Systems, Inc, and The Thorne Group.

Website: www.globalmethamphetamine.com

Contact: Luciano Colonna Chair, Executive Program Committee - 2008 Global Conference On Methamphetamine +00 (1) 801 635 7736 (USA); [email protected]

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Location: 
Prague
Czech Republic

1st Global Conference on Methamphetamine: Save money by registering EARLY!

1st global conference on methamphetamine

Science, Strategy and Response

Prague 2008

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The 1st Global Conference on Methamphetamine: Science, Strategy and Response, will take place in Prague on September 15th and 16th 2008. The primary objective of the conference is to bring together scientist, world leaders and professionals to discuss the intersection between methamphetamine use, public health, law enforcement and civil society.

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For information regarding registration, conference programme, exhibiting, sponsorship, travel and hotel accomodations, please visit:

www.globalmethconference.com

email

[email protected]

Conference Team

t.  +44 (0) 208 987 6021  f. +44 (0) 208 994 1533

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The conference partners would like to thank the City of Prague for supporting this event.

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Partners

Weave Consulting, Podane Ruce, Cranstoun Drug Services, COCA, Sananim, SCAN, Charles University, HRC 

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c/o Weave Consulting, 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH

Company registered in the UK 5658749

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Location: 
Prague
Czech Republic

2008 Global Methamphetamine Conference -- Only One Week Left

2008 global conference on methamphetamine: science, strategy, and response        prague, september 15 – 16

<http://www.globalmethconference.com>

 

Abstract Submission Deadline ENDS April 22nd, 2008

 

Abstract Submission Guidelines

Topics and areas to be discussed include
 
Regional Updates  / Pharmacology / Enforcement Programs  / Clandestine Drug Cleanup / The Matrix Model of Treatment / Women and Methamphetamine / Latest Research /Health Consequences /  Policy  / Prosecution Issues / Trafficking / Toxicology / Innovative Interventions / Replacement Therapies / Prevention and Education / Hepatitis A, B, & C Virus / HIV Risk Behavior / Methamphetamine and Reproductive Health / Treatment / Youth and Use / Patterns of Use / Harm Reduction / innovative Interventions / Use Among MSM / Trafficking  / Community-based Coalitions / Injection Drug Use / Epidemiology



1) Individual proposals for presentations are welcome.
 
2) Presentation formats may include
 
Individual papers
    Reports on research-in-progress

    Round-table discussions

    Topic-centred workshops

    Or a format more appropriate to your own work.

- Please indicate your presentation format in your proposal.
- Please make sure that your proposal identifies the language you wish to present in.
 
3) Please send a 250-word proposal - along with a short bio - to the email address below.
 
- Your abstract should not contain more than 250 words
- No abstract will be accepted without a short bio.
 
Please send your abstract to [email protected]

The Deadline for abstract submissions is April 22, 2008
Speakers will be notified by May 2nd, 2008
 
Do you have a question or concern?

 Please feel free to contact me at [email protected]
--

Luciano Colonna
Chair
Executive Program Committee

2008 Global Conference on Methamphetamine
September 15 –16, 2008 - Prague, Czech Republic
www.globalmethconference.com

[email protected]
+00 (1) 801 635 7736 (USA mobile)
+44 (0) 208 987 6021 (London tell)
+44 (0) 208 994 1533 (London fax)
lucianocolonna (skype)

Location: 
Prague
Czech Republic

Clinton Proposes Fixing Stupid Crack Law, While Creating Stupid Meth Law

Hillary Clinton's new anti-crime plan is a typical example of schizophrenic drug war policy-making. First, she gets it right on the crack/powder sentencing disparity:
At the federal level, Hillary will reform mandatory minimums for non-violent offenders, starting by eliminating the mandatory minimum for simple possession of crack cocaine and eliminating the disparity between crack and powder cocaine.
Then she dives headfirst into full-blown meth hysteria, buying into the absurd candy-flavored meth mythology, and proposing a federal methamphetamine sentencing disparity:
Make it a federal crime to manufacture or distribute a controlled substance – including meth – that is colored, packaged, or otherwise altered in a way designed to appeal to kids and young people. Last year, the DEA reported that drug dealers are coloring meth crystals and giving them names like "Strawberry Quick." The crystals resemble "pop rocks" and other forms of candy. One goal of dealers is to try to lure in young customers "by making meth seem less dangerous." Hillary will sternly punish any dealer or trafficker of meth that colors, packages, or otherwise alters the drug to appeal to young people.
Nevermind that the candy-meth story has been proven to a be a wild exaggeration. Nevermind that it is a textbook case of DEA fear-mongering, volleyed along from gullible reporters to political demagogues, eventually producing the intended effect of people like Clinton offering more money and power to the DEA. And nevermind that this is probably what she meant last week when she said the DEA has "more important work" to do than interfere with state medical marijuana laws.

Those things are all frustratingly true, and perfectly typical. What I find truly amazing is that Clinton literally proposes the creation of a sentencing disparity for meth, while in the same breath calling for parity in our cocaine laws. The pink meth hysteria of 2007 is every bit as absurd, if not more so, than was the great crack panic of 1986. I thought we'd all come to terms with the concept that disparate punishments for different forms of the same drug is bad policy, and yet here we are repeating the mistakes of the past just as quickly as we correct them.

(This blog post was published by StoptheDrugWar.org's lobbying arm, the Drug Reform Coordination Network, which also shares the cost of maintaining this web site. DRCNet Foundation takes no positions on candidates for public office, in compliance with section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, and does not pay for reporting that could be interpreted or misinterpreted as doing so.)

Location: 
United States

Global Conference on Methamphetamine - Abstract Submission Deadline Extended

Abstract Submission Deadline extended to April 22nd, 2008! Abstract Submission Guidelines Topics and areas to be discussed include: Pharmacology * Research * Trafficking * Treatment * Policy * Mental Health * Global Markets * HIV * Hepatitis * Community Education * Law Enforcement * Women *Trafficking * Production * Epidemiology * Demand Reduction * Harm Reduction * Public Health * MSM Sexual Risk * Youth * Environmental Issues * Commerce * Rapid Assessment* Replacement Therapy * Injection Drug Use * Asia * Prescribed Usage * Central Asia * Eastern Europe * Caribbean * Latin America * Oceania * North America * Western & Central Europe * Sub-Saharan Africa 1) Individual proposals for presentations are welcome. 2) Presentation formats may include individual papers, reports on research-in-progress, round-table discussions, topic-centred workshops, or a format more appropriate to your own work. - Please indicate your presentation format in your proposal. - Please make sure that your proposal identifies the language you wish to present in. 3) Please send a 250-word proposal - along with a short bio - to the email address below. - Your abstract should not contain more than 250 words. - No abstract will be accepted without a short bio. Please send your abstract to [email protected]. The Deadline for abstract submissions is April 22, 2008, 20:00 GMT. Speakers will be notified by May 2nd, 2008. Please email Luciano Colonna at [email protected] with any questions or concerns. Register now and benefit from the standard registration fee until June 1, 2008. Hotel and travel information can be found at www.globalmethconference.com
Location: 
Prague
Czech Republic

States Shifting to "Four Pillars" Approach, Instead of Mass Arrests and Scare Tactics, for Confronting Methamphetamine

Although the use of methamphetamine has remained fairly flat throughout this decade -- contrary to popular belief -- and its half-million semi-regular users are far fewer than regular users or heroin or cocaine, meth has been the demon drug du jour for the new millenium. The "meth epidemic" has aroused concerted law enforcement and propaganda efforts at the state and local levels, and belatedly aroused the attention of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), which turned away from its obsession with marijuana long enough to include a few anti-meth segments in its National Youth Anti-Drug Campaign.

But while the states and federal government fill their prisons with tens of thousands of meth offenders and crank out ever more draconian laws to try to suppress the popular stimulant, public health officials, harm reductionists, and drug reform activists say there is a better way. Instead of relying on punitive laws, scare tactics, and failed federal leadership in confronting methamphetamine abuse, states and the federal government would be better off adopting more enlightened alternative approaches.

Current, law enforcement-heavy approaches to meth are ineffective and counterproductive, said Bill Piper, national affairs director for the Drug Policy Alliance as he introduced a new report he authored, "A Four-Pillars Approach to Methamphetamine: Policies for Effective Drug Prevention, Treatment, Policing and Harm Reduction." "Meth is not a new drug," Piper told the Tuesday teleconference. "Its use has fluctuated for the past 40 years and has been relatively stable since 1999. But it has become more available, more potent, and more addictive over time, and federal policies have failed to reduce most of the problems associated with meth use."

Even when law enforcement can legitimately claim successes, as in the massive reduction in the number of home meth labs, it only breeds new problems, said Piper. "The law of unintended consequences brought us the increasing power of the Mexican meth cartels."

There is a better way, and that is to adopt the Four Pillars approach, Piper argued in the report. That approach, already in use in places like Geneva, Zurich, Frankfurt, Sydney, and most famously, Vancouver, "has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of users consuming drugs on the street, a significant drop in overdose deaths, and a reduction in the infection rates for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis," he said.

A Four Pillars approach to meth should include the following steps, the report said:

  • Eliminate barriers to successful meth treatment, such as the shortage of treatment programs for pregnant and parenting women;
  • Divert nonviolent methamphetamine offenders to treatment instead of jail;
  • Invest in research to develop the equivalent of methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of methamphetamine abuse, and allow doctors to prescribe dextroamphetmaine, modafinil, Ritalin and other medications to treat stimulant addiction as part of counseling and drug treatment;
  • Eliminate failed, scare-based prevention programs like DARE and the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, and increase funding for after-school programs instead;
  • Re-prioritize local and federal law enforcement agencies to focus on violent criminals instead of nonviolent drug offenders, and set clear statutory goals and reporting requirements for the disruption of major methamphetamine operations; and
  • Make sterile syringes widely available to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C.

While New Mexico is the only state that has formally embraced a Four Pillars strategy including harm reduction as part of its approach to meth -- a program in which DPA played a key and continuing role -- promising developments are afoot in other places as well, including California and Utah.

In California, Proposition 36, the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act, in effect since 2001, is making a significant contribution in drying up the flow of new drug prisoners into the state's swollen and budget-devouring prisons. Under Prop. 36, about 35,000 people a year have been diverted from prison to drug treatment through the criminal justice system, with slightly more than half of them reporting meth as their primary drug of abuse. With nearly 19,000 meth users a year entering treatment under Prop 36, the program is the largest meth treatment and prevention program in the nation.

"We are not only reducing the number of people locked up, but we have saved about $1.5 billion in the past seven years, with recidivism dropping and no negative impact on crime rates," said Margaret Dooley-Sammuli, Proposition 36 coordinator for DPA. "We can get treatment to people who need it with cost savings and a positive outcome."

Lou Martinez was one of those people. A chronic California meth user for a decade, he was arrested numerous times for possession of drugs or paraphernalia. "I was constantly getting picked up throughout the '90s, I could never comply with the probation conditions, I was in and out of jail all the time," he said.

Things changed after Prop. 36, Martinez said. "I got picked up again in 2002, but this time I was referred to Prop. 36 and was able to detox and get health and psych screenings. I spent 90 days in a transitional house, and when I graduated in 2004, for the first time in my adult life I wasn't under the control of the courts. Without Prop. 36, there is no way I could have broken that cycle of arrests and trying unsuccessfully to quit."

Martinez returned to college, got a bachelor's degree, and now works directly with Prop. 36 clients. "It saved my life," he said of the program.

In Utah, the Drug Offenders Rehabilitation Act (DORA), which provides substance abuse screening for anyone convicted of a felony is now taking an innovative Salt Lake County program statewide, while across the Four Corners in New Mexico, policymakers, state agencies and other stakeholders have developed a comprehensive meth strategy bringing together all four of the Four Pillars.

Harm reduction is a key element, said Reena Szczepanski, director of DPA New Mexico, and a key player in developing the New Mexico strategy. "What are we going to do for people before they are ready to go into treatment?" she said. "What other problems and conditions do they have? Since 1997, we've had a statewide system of needle exchanges, where drug users can get health education, access to testing, information on how to respond to overdoses. This is harm reduction. Before someone is ready to go into treatment, they are already engaging a system of services that will be there when they are ready," she said.

Methamphetamine may be over-hyped as a national drug problem, but it is a locus of concern among policymakers, health care professionals, law enforcement, and society at large. With meth such a high profile drug policy issue, the battles over how to approach it may set the tone for drug policy discussions for years to come. With its report calling for a Four Pillars approach, the Drug Policy Alliance is taking up the challenge.

2008 Global Conference on Methamphetamine: Call for Abstracts

2008 Global Conference on Methamphetamine: Science, Strategy, and Response Prague, September 15 - 16 Abstract Submission Guidelines Topics and areas to be discussed include: Pharmacology * Research * Trafficking * Treatment * Policy * Mental Health * Global Markets * HIV * Hepatitis * Community Education * Law Enforcement * Women * Trafficking * Production * Epidemiology* Demand Reduction * Harm Reduction * Public Health * MSM Sexual Risk * Youth * Environmental Issue * Commerce * Rapid Assessment * Replacement Therapy * Injection Drug Use * Asia * Prescribed Usage * Central Asia * Eastern Europe * Caribbean * Latin America * Oceania * North America * Western & Central Europe * Sub-Saharan Africa 1) Individual proposals for presentations are welcome. 2) Presentation formats may include: a) Individual papers b) Reports on research-in-progress c) Round-table discussions d) Topic-centred workshops e) Or a format more appropriate to your own work. - Please indicate your presentation format in your proposal. - Please make sure that your proposal identifies the language you wish to present in. 3) Please send a 250-word proposal - along with a short bio - to the email address below. - Your abstract should not contain more than 250 words. - No abstract will be accepted without a short bio. Please send your abstract to [email protected] Deadline for submissions is April 2, 2008. Speakers will be notified by April 30, 2008 Do you have a question or concern? Please email Luciano Colonna at [email protected] ~ 1st Global Conference on Methamphetamine ~ September 15 -16, 2008 - Prague, Czech Republic Please visit www.globalmethconference.com for information
Location: 
Prague
Czech Republic

Press Release and Report: U.S. Methamphetamine Policies (Fed and State Levels)

For Immediate Release: March 18th, 2008 Contact: Tony Newman (646) 335-5384 or Bill Piper (202) 669-6430 New Report Evaluates U.S. Methamphetamine Policies, Recommends Comprehensive and Integrated “Four Pillars” Response California, New Mexico and Utah Cited as States with Exemplary Methamphetamine Policies Federal Government Criticized for Short-Changing Treatment and Public Health At a tele-press conference today, the Drug Policy Alliance released a groundbreaking report that evaluates current state and federal methamphetamine policies and recommends major reforms. The report, entitled “A Four-Pillars Approach to Methamphetamine: Policies for Effective Drug Prevention, Treatment, Policing and Harm Reduction,” is the first report in the U.S. to lay out a “four pillars” approach to addressing methamphetamine abuse. In Geneva, Zurich, Frankfurt, Sydney and other major cities around the world, most notably Vancouver, the four pillars approach to substance abuse has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of users consuming drugs on the street, a significant drop in overdose deaths, and a reduction in the infection rates for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. “The U.S. government has taken a punitive, supply-side approach to methamphetamine for more than 40 years, and at every step of the way this approach has enriched organized crime, made street methamphetamine more potent, and worsened meth-related problems,“ said Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance and author of the new report. “It’s time for a demand-side approach that prioritizes treatment, public health and family unity.” Other speakers included Reena Szczepanski, director of DPA New Mexico and a member of the Mid Region Council of Governments’ Methamphetamine Task Force; Lou Martinez, a former methamphetamine user and graduate of California’s successful treatment-instead-of-incarceration program, Proposition 36; and Margaret Dooley-Sammuli, statewide Prop. 36 coordinator for the Drug Policy Alliance. The report makes numerous recommendations for improving U.S. prevention, treatment, policing and harm reduction efforts, including: - Eliminate barriers to successful meth treatment, such as the shortage of treatment programs for pregnant and parenting women; - Divert nonviolent methamphetamine offenders to treatment instead of jail; - Invest in research to develop the equivalent of methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of methamphetamine abuse, and allow doctors to prescribe dextroamphetmaine, modafinil, Ritalin and other medications to treat stimulant addiction as part of counseling and drug treatment; - Eliminate failed, scare-based prevention programs like D.A.R.E. and the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, and increase funding for after-school programs instead; - Re-prioritize local and federal law enforcement agencies to focus on violent criminals instead of nonviolent drug offenders, and set clear statutory goals and reporting requirements for the disruption of major methamphetamine operations; and - Make sterile syringes widely available to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C. While the report concludes that the federal government has failed to enact an effective methamphetamine strategy, it finds that several states are already leading the way, including California, New Mexico and Utah. California’s Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (Proposition 36) has proven to be the nation’s most systematic public health response to methamphetamine to date. This landmark measure, approved by 61% of voters, diverts approximately 35,000 persons from jail to drug treatment every year—over half of whom identify methamphetamine as their primary illegal drug. No other statewide program in the nation has offered treatment to or graduated more methamphetamine users than Proposition 36. In the process, California taxpayers have saved more than $1.3 billion over the program’s first six years. New Mexico is the only state to have developed a statewide methamphetamine strategy that combines prevention, treatment, policing, and harm reduction. This strategy is becoming a model for bringing together key stakeholders, fostering interagency collaboration, and implementing a coordinated methamphetamine strategy. In addition, DPA New Mexico is working with state agencies and the private sector to implement a youth methamphetamine education program funded by federal grant money that will serve as an alternative to the failed scare tactics of D.A.R.E., the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, and the Montana Meth Project. Utah recently enacted an innovative program that provides substance abuse screening and assessment to anyone convicted of a felony offense (drug- and non-drug-related). The results of these screenings and assessments are provided to the court before sentencing, allowing judges to divert certain offenders to treatment instead of jail. This program, the Drug Offender Reform Act (DORA), is based on a pilot program that has diverted more than 200 offenders in Salt Lake County to treatment instead of jail, many of whom have methamphetamine-related problems. The Utah Methamphetamine Joint Task Force recently rejected calls to develop scare-based TV ads in favor of developing a more realistic and uplifting prevention campaign. “Our country cannot incarcerate its way out of the methamphetamine problem,” said Piper. “Punitive policies have been exhaustively tried and they have failed, not just with methamphetamine, but also with cocaine, heroin, marijuana and numerous other drugs including alcohol during Prohibition. The federal government should follow the lead of California, New Mexico and Utah and emphasize treatment over incarceration.”
Location: 
United States

1st Global Conference on Methamphetamine: Science, Strategy and Response

The main conference events will be held at Prague's historic Charles University. The primary objective of the conference is to bring together scientists, world leaders and professionals to discuss the intersection between methamphetamine use, public health, law enforcement and civil society. The event will feature a range of plenary presentations, symposium sessions, panel discussions and social events. Topics and areas to be discussed include: Pharmacology / Research / Trafficking / Treatment / Policy / Mental Health / Global Markets / HIV / Hepatitis / Community Education / Women / Production / Epidemiology / Law Enforcement / Demand Reduction / Harm Reduction / Public Health / MSM / Sexual Risk / Environmental Issues / Commerce / Rapid Assessment / Youth / Replacement Therapy / Injection Drug Use / Prescribed Usage / Eastern Europe / Central Asia / Asia / Caribbean / Latin America / Oceania / North America / Western & Central Europe / Sub-Saharan Africa / For information regarding registration, call for abstracts, exhibiting, sponsorship, travel and hotel accommodations, please visit: www.globalmethconference.com or email: [email protected] About Prague: Prague's magical city of bridges, cathedrals, gold-tipped towers and church domes, has been mirrored in the surface of the swan-filled Vltava River for more than ten centuries. Undamaged by WWII, Prague's compact medieval centre remains a wonderful mixture of cobbled lanes, walled courtyards, cathedrals and countless church spires all in the shadow of her majestic 9th century castle that looks eastward as the sun sets behind her. Prague is also a modern and vibrant city full of energy, music, cultural art, fine dining and special events catering to the independent traveler's thirst for adventure. Regarded by many as one of worlds most charming and beautiful cities, Prague has become the most popular travel destination in Central Europe. The conference partners would like to thank the City of Prague for supporting this event. Partners include: Weave Consulting, Podane Ruce, COCA, Cranstoun Drug Services, SCAN, Sananim, Charles University & the Harm Reduction Project
Date: 
Mon, 09/15/2008 - 8:00am - Tue, 09/16/2008 - 8:00pm
Location: 
Prague
Czech Republic

Teleconference: New Report Evaluates Methamphetamine Policies, Recommends Comprehensive and Integrated Reponse

Please join us for a tele-press conference discussing a new report that evaluates U.S. methamphetamine policies and recommends a comprehensive and integrated response. Call in information: 1-800-311-9402 Passcode: Meth Report Presenting are: Reena Szczepanski, director of DPA New Mexico and co-chair of Gov. Bill Richardson’s Methamphetamine Working Group New Mexico has developed a successful “four pillars” approach to methamphetamine that can serve as a model for other states and Congress. Lou Martinez, former meth user and graduate of California’s successful treatment-instead-of-incarceration program, Proposition 36 Margaret Dooley-Sammuli, statewide Prop. 36 coordinator for the Drug Policy Alliance Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance and author of the new report The report, entitled “A Four-Pillars Approach to Methamphetamine: Policies for Effective Drug Prevention, Treatment, Policing and Harm Reduction,” is the first report in the U.S. to lay out a “four pillars” approach to addressing methamphetamine abuse. In Geneva, Zurich, Frankfurt, Sydney, and other major cities around the world, most notably Vancouver, the four pillars approach to substance abuse has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of users consuming drugs on the street, a significant drop in overdose deaths, and a reduction in the infection rates for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. New Mexico is the only U.S. state to have implemented a statewide “four pillars” methamphetamine strategy. The report makes numerous recommendations for improving U.S. prevention, treatment, policing and harm reduction efforts, including: Eliminate barriers to successful meth treatment, such as the shortage of treatment programs for pregnant and parenting women; Divert nonviolent methamphetamine offenders to treatment instead of jail; Invest in research to develop the equivalent of methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of methamphetamine abuse, and allow doctors to prescribe dextroamphetmaine, modafinil, Ritalin and other medications to treat stimulant addiction as part of counseling and drug treatment; Eliminate failed, scare-based prevention programs like D.A.R.E. and the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, and increase funding for after-school programs instead; Re-prioritize local and federal law enforcement agencies to focus on violent criminals instead of nonviolent drug offenders, and set clear statutory goals and reporting requirements for the disruption of major methamphetamine operations; and Make sterile syringes widely available to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C. While the report concludes that the federal government has failed to enact an effective methamphetamine strategy, it finds that several states are already leading the way, including California, New Mexico and Utah. California’s Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (Proposition 36) has proven to be the nation’s most systematic public health response to methamphetamine to date. This landmark measure, approved by 61% of voters, diverts approximately 35,000 persons from jail to drug treatment every year—over half of whom identify methamphetamine as their primary illegal drug. No other statewide program in the nation has offered treatment to or graduated more methamphetamine users than Proposition 36. In the process, California taxpayers have saved more than $1.3 billion over the program’s first six years. New Mexico is the only state to have developed a statewide methamphetamine strategy that combines prevention, treatment, policing, and harm reduction. This strategy is becoming a model for bringing together key stakeholders, fostering interagency collaboration, and implementing a coordinated methamphetamine strategy. In addition, DPA New Mexico is working with state agencies and the private sector to implement a youth methamphetamine education program funded by federal grant money that will serve as an alternative to the failed scare tactics of D.A.R.E., the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, and the Montana Meth Project. Utah recently enacted an innovative program that provides substance abuse screening and assessment to anyone convicted of a felony offense (drug- and non-drug-related). The results of these screenings and assessments are provided to the court before sentencing, allowing judges to divert certain offenders to treatment instead of jail. This program, the Drug Offender Reform Act (DORA), is based on a pilot program that has diverted more than 200 offenders in Salt Lake County to treatment instead of jail, many of whom have methamphetamine-related problems. The Utah Methamphetamine Joint Task Force recently rejected calls to develop scare-based TV ads in favor of developing a more realistic and uplifting prevention campaign. An advance copy of the report is available upon request -- contact (202) 669-6430.
Date: 
Tue, 03/18/2008 - 2:00pm
Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

Drug War Issues

Criminal JusticeAsset Forfeiture, Collateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Court Rulings, Drug Courts, Due Process, Felony Disenfranchisement, Incarceration, Policing (2011 Drug War Killings, 2012 Drug War Killings, 2013 Drug War Killings, 2014 Drug War Killings, 2015 Drug War Killings, 2016 Drug War Killings, 2017 Drug War Killings, Arrests, Eradication, Informants, Interdiction, Lowest Priority Policies, Police Corruption, Police Raids, Profiling, Search and Seizure, SWAT/Paramilitarization, Task Forces, Undercover Work), Probation or Parole, Prosecution, Reentry/Rehabilitation, Sentencing (Alternatives to Incarceration, Clemency and Pardon, Crack/Powder Cocaine Disparity, Death Penalty, Decriminalization, Defelonization, Drug Free Zones, Mandatory Minimums, Rockefeller Drug Laws, Sentencing Guidelines)CultureArt, Celebrities, Counter-Culture, Music, Poetry/Literature, Television, TheaterDrug UseParaphernalia, ViolenceIntersecting IssuesCollateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Violence, Border, Budgets/Taxes/Economics, Business, Civil Rights, Driving, Economics, Education (College Aid), Employment, Environment, Families, Free Speech, Gun Policy, Human Rights, Immigration, Militarization, Money Laundering, Pregnancy, Privacy (Search and Seizure, Drug Testing), Race, Religion, Science, Sports, Women's IssuesMarijuana PolicyGateway Theory, Hemp, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Marijuana Industry, Medical MarijuanaMedicineMedical Marijuana, Science of Drugs, Under-treatment of PainPublic HealthAddiction, Addiction Treatment (Science of Drugs), Drug Education, Drug Prevention, Drug-Related AIDS/HIV or Hepatitis C, Harm Reduction (Methadone & Other Opiate Maintenance, Needle Exchange, Overdose Prevention, Pill Testing, Safer Injection Sites)Source and Transit CountriesAndean Drug War, Coca, Hashish, Mexican Drug War, Opium ProductionSpecific DrugsAlcohol, Ayahuasca, Cocaine (Crack Cocaine), Ecstasy, Heroin, Ibogaine, ketamine, Khat, Kratom, Marijuana (Gateway Theory, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Medical Marijuana, Hashish), Methamphetamine, New Synthetic Drugs (Synthetic Cannabinoids, Synthetic Stimulants), Nicotine, Prescription Opiates (Fentanyl, Oxycontin), Psilocybin / Magic Mushrooms, Psychedelics (LSD, Mescaline, Peyote, Salvia Divinorum)YouthGrade School, Post-Secondary School, Raves, Secondary School