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Increased Illegal Gun Prevalence

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American guns help fuel Mexico's drug trade killings

Localização: 
Mexico City
Mexico
Publication/Source: 
San Francisco Chronicle
URL: 
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/07/15/ING9UR0IMO1.DTL

FEATURE-"Iron river of guns" flows from U.S. to Mexico

Localização: 
Phoenix, AZ
United States
Publication/Source: 
Reuters AlertNet (UK)
URL: 
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N12238536.htm

Mexican police a flaw in drug battle

Localização: 
Naco
Mexico
Publication/Source: 
San Jose Mercury News (CA)
URL: 
http://www.mercurynews.com/nationworld/ci_6338659

U.S. pledges to fight flow of illegal arms to Mexico

Localização: 
Jiutepec
Mexico
Publication/Source: 
The Dallas Morning News
URL: 
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/world/mexico/stories/DN-mexdrugs_09int.ART.State.Edition1.439c6ff.html

Feds say Arizona guns going to Mexican drug lords

Localização: 
Phoenix, AZ
United States
Publication/Source: 
Helena Independent Record (MT)
URL: 
http://www.helenair.com/articles/2007/05/25/montana/000guns.txt

Latin America: UN Drug Office Blames Central American Crime and Violence on Drugs, Not Prohibition

Central America's stability and development is being thwarted by crime and violence, much of it caused by the drug trade, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said in a report released Wednesday. However, the report called for an intensification of the prohibitionist policies that helped create the problems in the first place.

https://stopthedrugwar.org/files/un-report-cover.jpg
global and tunnel vision at the same time
When a multi-billion dollar drug trafficking industry and the violence it generates is added to a witch's brew of social problems, including poverty, income disparity, gang violence, high homicide rates, easy access to firearms, weak political and social institutions, and widespread corruption, the weak Central American nations are under siege, the report warned.

"The warning signs are evident in this report -- gun-related crime, gang violence, kidnapping, the proliferation of private security companies," said UNODC executive director Antonio Maria Costa in a press release accompanying the report. "But these problems are in no way inherent to the region. They can be overcome."

Sandwiched between the coca and cocaine producing regions of South America and the insatiable market for cocaine in North America, Central America sees nearly 90% of cocaine headed north. While little of it falls off the truck -- Central American usage rates are low, according to UNODC -- violence and corruption associated with the black market drug trade take their toll.

"Where crime and corruption reign and drug money perverts the economy, the State no longer has a monopoly on the use of force and citizens no longer trust their leaders and public institutions," Mr. Costa said, underscoring that development is stunted where crime and corruption thrive. "As a result, the social contract is in tatters and people take the law into their own hands."

Countries in the region and beyond need to work together to strengthen their criminal justice systems, and break the links between drugs, crime, and underdevelopment, the UNODC advised. "Cooperation is vital," Costa said. "The problems are too big, too inter-linked and too dangerous to be left to individual states."

But rather than revising the global drug prohibition regime that generates the huge black market flows of cash, drugs, and guns at the root of many of Central America's problems, Costa and the UNODC simply call for more of the same. "We have a shared responsibility and common interest in helping the countries of Central America to withstand external pressures and to strengthen their internal resistance to the damaging effects of drugs and crime," Costa said. "Let us unlock the potential of this region."

If Costa and the UNODC suffer from tunnel vision when it comes to drug prohibition, at least they displayed a nuanced understanding of the youth gangs or "maras" that are so quickly demonized in the press. "Heavy-handed crackdowns on gangs alone will not resolve the underlying problem. Indeed, it may exacerbate them," Costa noted. "Gang culture is a symptom of a deeper social malaise that cannot be solved by putting all disaffected street kids behind bars. The future of Central America depends on seeing youth as an asset rather than a liability."

A Mexican cartel army's war within

Localização: 
Veracruz
Mexico
Publication/Source: 
Los Angeles Times
URL: 
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/front/la-fg-zetas20may20,1,6714853.story?coll=la-headlines-frontpage&track=crosspromo

In the opium capital of the world, very late lessons in drug enforcement

Localização: 
Kabul
Afghanistan
Publication/Source: 
International Herald Tribune (France)
URL: 
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/05/15/asia/opium.php

Mexican drug gangs target military as president tries to regain territory lost to cartels

Localização: 
Apatzingan
Mexico
Publication/Source: 
Boston Herald
URL: 
http://news.bostonherald.com/international/americas/view.bg?articleid=1001229

Border Violence Concerns State Officials

Localização: 
NM
United States
Publication/Source: 
News 92.3 KTAR (AZ)
URL: 
http://ktar.com/?nid=6&sid=476540

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