Coca

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Washington Office on Latin America Book Launch Reception

The Washington Office on Latin America is pleased to invite you to a reception to celebrate the publication of Washington Office on Latin America: Thirty Years of Advocacy for Human Rights, Democracy and Social Justice by Coletta A. Youngers Tuesday, September 19, 2006 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm WOLA’s office 1630 Connecticut Ave. NW Suite 200 Washington, DC 20009 You have been an important part of our history. WOLA is celebrating its 30 years of history with friends, staff and board members with the launch of our most recent publication Washington Office on Latin America: Thirty Years of Advocacy for Human Rights, Democracy and Social Justice. We would like to share this special evening with you. Come celebrate WOLA’s history and mingle with our current staff and board to discuss WOLA’s present and to discover WOLA’s future. Please RSVP by Monday, September 18th to Ana Paula Duarte: [email protected]
Data: 
Tue, 09/19/2006 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Localização: 
1630 Connecticut St. NW Suite 200
Washington, DC
United States

Opportunities and Challenges for Drug Control Policy in Bolivia

The Washington Office on Latin America is pleased to invite you to a seminar: Opportunities and Challenges for Drug Control Policy in Bolivia with Felipe Cáceres, Vice Minister of Social Defense Tuesday, September 12, 2006 12 pm to 1:30 pm The Root Room Carnegie Endowment for International Peace 1779 Massachusetts Ave. NW Washington, DC 20036 A former mayor from Bolivia’s Chapare region, Felipe Cáceres is responsible for implementing Bolivian government drug control policy. The Morales government is controlling coca production through voluntary crop reductions that seek to avoid conflict and violence as well as the re-planting that has undermined past eradication efforts. At the same time, the government has also stepped up interdiction of illicit drugs at all stages of production. Cáceres will discuss international cooperation, the new government’s drug control strategy, the results obtained to date, and prospects for the future. The presentation will be in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. Light food and beverages will be served. Please RSVP by Monday, September 11th to Jessica Eby [email protected].
Data: 
Tue, 09/12/2006 - 12:00pm - 10:30pm
Localização: 
1779 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036
United States

Out from the Shadows

An estimated 300 people attended The First Latin American Legalization Summit, or Out from the Shadows Mérida, at the Autonomous University of the Yucatan in Mexico, February 12-15, 2003, including Mexican activists, national legislators and advocates throughout Latin America, Americans, Europeans, and numerous students and interested members of the community -- an historic, first of its kind, global summit calling for and end to drug prohibition. Though the event's primary focus was on legalization, the coca issue was also dealt with extensively. Among the important leaders from the cocalero movement were Felipe Quispe of the Bolivia Parliament and Nancy Obregon of Peru. Other events in this international legalization conference series included an institutional two-day event at the European Parliament in Brussels in September 2002 and a press conference with Canadian Sen. Pierre Claude Nolin in Washington in April 2003.

This program is currently inactive due to lack of funding. If you are interested in supporting an international legalization conference, please contact us! Seed costs for the next conference should be in the neighborhood of $50,000US.

Please view video footage and photographs from Mérida online! Our thanks to Jim & Ellen Fields of Eclectech Media in Mérida, and to Radio Radicale, for their outstanding work documenting this historic event, as well as Jeremy Bigwood for photography. View or listen to Eclectech video or audio of most of the conference, English and Spanish versions available. Visit Radio Radicale for video as well as interviews from the conference, in the original language of the presenters.

Check out our "Road to Mérida" interview series:

Mario Menéndez, Publisher of !Por Esto!, Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico
Dr. Jaime Malamud-Goti, former Argentine Solicitor General
Dr. Francisco Fernandez, Anthropologist and Former Rector of Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
Gustavo de Greiff, Former Prosecutor General of Colombia
Luis Gómez, Andean Bureau Chief for Narco News
Ricardo Sala, ViveConDrogas.com (Live With Drugs), Mexico
Dr. Silvia Inchaurraga, Argentine Harm Reductionist
María Mercedes Moreno of Mama Coca
Luiz Paulo Guanabara, Brazil, Executive Director of Psico-Tropicus

 

Click here for further background on DRCNet and Out from the Shadows.

Organizations participating in the Out from the Shadows campaign:

ABRAÇO • Ale Yarok • Asociación Civil DRIS • Asociación Mexicana de Estudios del Cannabis • Asociación de Reducción de Daños de la Argentina • Canadian Foundation for Drug Policy • Centro de Investigación de la Comunicación Social • Centro de Mídia Independente Belo Horizonte • CocachasquiCommon Sense for Drug PolicyCriminal Justice Policy Foundation • DEBED vzw • DieCannabisKampagneDrug Policy AllianceDrug Reform Coordination NetworkDrolegDrug Policy Forum of California • Drug Users Advocacy Group of Amsterdam • EfficacyFamilies and Friends for Drug Law ReformForum DrogheFuoriluogo • Grupo Ekologiko Ayün • International Antiprohibitionist LeagueInternational Coalition of NGOs for Just and Effective Drug Policies • JES Rhein-Main • John Mordaunt Trust • Law Enforcement Against ProhibitionMild Green Media Centre • Movimiento Canábico de Perú • Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies • National Association for Public Health Policy • Netherlands Drug Policy Foundation • November Coalition • Parliamentarians for Antiprohibitionist Action • Por Esto! • Psicotropicus • ReconsiDer: Forum on Drug Policy • Red Latinoamericana de Reduccion de Daños • SOMA Associação Portuguesa Antiproibicionista • Students for Sensible Drug PolicyTransform - the Campaign for Effective Drug PolicyTransnational Radical PartyTrebach InstituteTri-State Drug Policy ForumUnitarian Universalists for Drug Policy ReformUniversidad Autónoma de YucatánVirginians Against Drug Violence

Latin America: Venezuela-Funded Coca Factory Opens in Bolivia

Bolivian President Evo Morales traveled to the town of Irupana in Bolivia's Yungas coca-growing region Saturday to preside over the opening of a factory where coca leaves will be made into legal products. Morales, who rose to power as the leader of a confederation of coca growers' unions has vowed to seek alternative legal uses for the plant as part of his anti-cocaine strategy.

"Manufacturing coca products doesn't do any harm because coca isn't a drug," Morales told hundreds of coca growing peasants in Irupana in an address that was televised around the country. "They're going to make flour, tea, soft drinks and other products in the first two plants," he said.

Earlier this year, Morales traveled the world, in part to seek markets for coca products, and that strategy may be paying off. The Associated Press reported Bolivian government officials saying that China, Cuba, India, and Venezuela have already expressed interest in buying coca products.

Morales has positioned himself alongside Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and Cuba's Fidel Castro as part of a leftist pole in hemispheric affairs. Bolivian Agriculture Minister Hugo Salvatierra told Bolivian state television that Chavez has pledged $1 million to fund two coca-processing factories.

Although current Bolivian law limits coca production to some 29,000 acres in the Yungas, unsanctioned production is occurring there, as well as in the Chapare region. According to US and UN figures, Bolivia is the world's third largest coca producer, after Colombia and Peru. US government policy is to eradicate unsanctioned coca, but Morales would rather find legitimate markets for it.

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