Drug-Related AIDS/HIV or Hepatitis C

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Two Job Opportunities at Washington,DC-Based PreventionWorks

PreventionWorks, a needle exchange/harm reduction program operating in the District of Columbia, has recently applied for funding for a new program they are calling FOCUS. This will be an HIV treatment adherence support program for low-income residents of the District of Columbia who are current or former drug users, are in care for HIV infection, and struggling to focus on their HIV care and/or treatment regimen. Though funding has not been secured, the recruiting of strong candidates -- people with solid backgrounds in HIV and substance use, and who know District resources -- to staff the program has begun. Interested applicants should submit a cover letter and resume to Paola Barahona, PreventionWorks executive director, by e-mail ([email protected]), fax (202-797-3553), or mail (PreventionWorks, 1407 S Street, NW, Washington, DC 20009). Job 1: FOCUS Consultant Clinical Director The FOCUS Clinical Director will work 20 hours per week and will provide the leadership for the FOCUS program. The Clinical Director will supervise the two full-time Care Coordinators who will each carry a caseload of 20-25. The Clinical Supervisor will not carry a caseload. Instead, the Clinical Supervisor will conduct all of the support group meetings, will provide coverage during drop-in hours, and will provide individual counseling with clients as needed. Meetings will be an important part of this job, as the Clinical Director will attend the PreventionWorks weekly meeting, will conduct a weekly team meeting with the Care Coordinators, and will meet privately with the Executive Director weekly (or as needed). The FOCUS Clinical Director will be supervised by the PreventionWorks Executive Director. Performance goals will be outlined with the Executive Director at the beginning of the assignment. These will serve as the primary means of performance evaluation during semi-annual performance evaluation meetings. The FOCUS Clinical Director will work at least one evening per week and on Saturday afternoon. Aside from meetings, support groups, and drop-in hours, the schedule will be flexible. Requirements for the FOCUS Clinical Director include a bachelor's degree (master's degree preferred), certification as a Licensed Professional Counselor (CAC, LCPC, or LCSW), documented experience in HIV care and treatment and substance use issues, experience leading support groups and providing individual therapy, belief in and commitment to harm reduction approach regarding substance use, prior case management experience, prior supervisory experience, and a clean driving record. Additional desired qualifications include being bilingual (English/Spanish), having life experience with substance use and/or HIV treatment adherence, and having a familiarity with and connections to a wide variety of services in DC to which clients could be referred and from which clients could be recruited. Job 2: FOCUS Care Coordinators (2) Two Care Coordinators will be hired by the FOCUS Director to work with clients and help them adhere to their HIV medication regimens. The Care Coordinators will each work 40 hours per week (some evening and weekend coverage will be required) and carry a caseload of twenty to twenty-five clients. The Care Coordinators will work with clients to develop an individual treatment adherence plan and help clients stick to their plan. This position will require accompanying clients to medical appointments, meeting with clients individually on a weekly basis, calling and emailing clients to remind them about appointments and taking their medications, referring clients to a wide range of services that are geographically convenient and will meet the client's needs, staffing drop-in hours, and providing any additional support that clients require to help them adhere to their treatment regimen. The Care Coordinators will be supervised by the FOCUS Director. Performance goals will be outlined by each Coordinator with the Director at the beginning of the assignment. These will serve as the primary means of performance evaluation during semi-annual performance evaluation meetings. In addition, the Director will observe services and provide feedback to each Care Coordinator on a scheduled and/or spontaneous basis. The Care Coordinators will work at least one evening per week and on alternate Saturday afternoons. Aside from meetings and drop-in hours, the Care Coordinator's schedule will be flexible to allow each Coordinator to meet the needs of his/her individual clients. Requirements for the FOCUS Care Coordinator include an associate's degree (bachelor's degree preferred), experience with addictions counseling (CAC, BSW, LGSW preferred, but life experience could be substituted for these degrees), documented experience in HIV care and treatment and substance use issues, belief in and commitment to harm reduction approaches regarding substance use, prior case management experience, and a clean driving record. Additional desired qualifications include being bilingual (English/Spanish), having life experience with substance use and/or HIV treatment adherence, and having familiarity with and connections to a wide variety of services in DC to which clients could be referred and from which clients could be recruited.
Localização: 
Washington, DC
United States

Harm Reduction: Los Angeles County Okays Needle Exchange Program

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved a $500,000 needle exchange program Tuesday. The board approved the harm reduction measure, which is designed to save lives and dollars by reducing the rate of spread of blood-borne diseases such as AIDS and Hepatitis B and C, on a 3-2 vote.

https://stopthedrugwar.org/files/needle-exchange-logo.gif
widely-used syringe exchange logo
The city of Los Angeles and seven California counties already have approved needle exchange programs. Los Angeles County has an estimated 120,000 to 190,000 drug injectors, nearly half of whom are estimated to share needles.

The new needle exchanges targeting heroin users will be at the Asian American Drug Abuse Program, Bienestar Human Services, Common Ground-The Westside HIV Community Center, Public Health Foundation Enterprises (and through them, Clean Needles Now) and Tarzana Treatment Centers.

Supervisors Mike Antonovich and Don Knabe voted against the program. "The problem that we have here is you're having the government be in a position of sponsoring a known drug that could lead to death and leads to dependence," Antonovich said. "I would rather put our money into rehabilitation and education encouraging a drug-free society instead of being politically correct and helping addicts remain addicts," he said.

But Supervisor Gloria Molina defended the program, saying its aim is to prevent AIDS. "This is a very simple program that's had unbelievable success, and it's unfortunate (that) it is not supposed to address, and it does not address, the rehabilitation of drug users. All it does is, hopefully, address the issue of prevention of HIV," Molina said.

LA Supervisors expected to approve needle exchange

Localização: 
Los Angeles, CA
United States
Publication/Source: 
KESQ News Channel 3 (CA)
URL: 
http://www.kesq.com/Global/story.asp?S=6218081&nav=9qrx

Job Listings: Two Positions Available at The Urban Health Program at RTI International

The Urban Health Program at RTI International seeks to fill 2 positions on a three-year, community-based study of women who use methamphetamine in San Francisco. The study focuses on sexual risk and includes testing and counseling for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Work will be conducted at community field sites and the RTI office in downtown San Francisco. The Interviewer position is 60% time and the Senior Interviewer position is 80% time. Both positions include health benefits. Applicants should provide a resume and cover letter as instructed at the bottom of each position description. Successful candidates will become employees of Public Health Foundation Enterprises (PHFE). DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MARCH 15, 2007 Senior Interviewer/Counselor (80% time) Public Health Foundation Enterprises (PHFE) and the Urban Health Program at RTI International seek a Senior Interviewer to conduct data collection and provide assistance to the Project Director for a three-year, community-based study of women who use methamphetamine in San Francisco. The study focuses on sexual risk and includes testing and counseling for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Duties include client screening and intake, quantitative and qualitative data collection, database maintenance and HIV/STI counseling. Work will be conducted at community field sites and the RTI office downtown San Francisco. This is an 80% time position. We are seeking a flexible, detail-oriented and well-organized candidate who has some experience with community-based research. S/he will report to the Project Director. Job Description -Quantitative data collection * Screen potential participants * Carry out informed consent procedures * Conduct structured, quantitative interviews with research subjects * Operate computerized data collection program (CAPI) on a laptop computer. * Conduct open-ended qualitative interviews -Counseling and referral * Perform HIV and STI pre- and post-test counseling * Conduct harm reduction counseling * Provide referrals, as appropriate, to medical, social and drug treatment services -Data management and analysis * Assist with coding and analysis of qualitative data * Enter appointment and network data into an Access database * Other data management-related duties as assigned -Assist Project Director as assigned -Required Skills and Qualifications * 2 years experience in HIV and/or STI counseling * 2 years experience in quantitative data collection * 1 year experience working with marginalized populations, such as drug users, homeless people, sex workers * Bachelors degree in social sciences or related field * 2 years experience in social, behavioral, or epidemiological research * Familiarity with the practice and principles of harm reduction -Preferred Skills and Qualifications * Current California State certification as an HIV test counselor * Experience using computerized questionnaire data collection systems * Familiarity with Respondent Driven Sampling * Master's degree in public health or related field The start date is April 1, 2007, and the salary range is $40k-$48k (full-time equivalent) plus benefits. This is an 80% time position, and the hiring supervisors are Lynn Wenger (e-mail: [email protected], tel: 415-538-0942) and Jennifer Lorvick (e-mail: [email protected], tel: 415-538-0803. To apply, send resume and cover letter to Lynn Wenger, Project Director by e-mail or by mail: RTI International, 28 - 2nd Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, CA 94105. Interviewer/Counselor (60% time) Public Health Foundation Enterprises (PHFE) and the Urban Health Program at RTI International seek an Interviewer/Counselor to conduct data collection and provide infectious disease test results counseling for a three-year, community-based study of women who use methamphetamine in San Francisco. The study focuses on sexual risk and includes testing and counseling for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Duties include client screening and intake, quantitative data collection and HIV/STI counseling. Work will be conducted at community field sites and the RTI office downtown San Francisco. This is a 60% time position. We are seeking a flexible and detail oriented person with strong interpersonal skills and experience working with marginalized populations. The interviewer/counselor will report to the Project Director. Job Description -Quantitative data collection * Screen potential participants for eligibility * Carry out informed consent procedures * Conduct structured, quantitative interviews with research subjects * Operate computerized data collection program (CAPI) on a laptop computer. -Counseling and referral * Perform HIV and STI pre- and post-test counseling * Conduct harm reduction counseling * Provide referrals, as appropriate, to medical, social and drug treatment services -Other duties as assigned -Required Skills and Qualifications * 1 year experience in HIV and/or STI counseling * 1 year experience in quantitative data collection * 1 year experience working with marginalized populations, such as drug users, homeless people, sex workers. * 1 year experience in social, behavioral, or epidemiological research * Familiarity with the practice and principles of harm reduction -Preferred Skills and Qualifications * Current California State certification as an HIV test counselor * Experience using computerized questionnaire data collection systems The start date is April 1, 2007, and the salary range is $38k-$44k (full-time equivalent) plus benefits. This is an 60% time position, and the hiring supervisors are Lynn Wenger (e-mail: [email protected], tel: 415-538-0942) and Jennifer Lorvick (e-mail: [email protected], tel: 415-538-0803. To apply, send resume and cover letter to Lynn Wenger, Project Director by e-mail, fax (415-538-0879) or by mail: RTI International, 28 - 2nd Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, CA, 94105.
Localização: 
San Francisco, CA
United States

Afghanistan: UN Monitor Cites 'Rapid Deterioration' As Drugs Spread

Localização: 
Kabul
Afghanistan
Publication/Source: 
Radio Free Afghanistan
URL: 
http://www.azadiradio.org/en/news/2007/03/67434DD7-4B7B-4C7D-9F2F-919107E1525D.ASP

Op-Ed: Canada must not follow the U.S. on drug policy

Localização: 
Ottawa, ON
Canada
Publication/Source: 
Ottawa Citizen
URL: 
http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/opinion/story.html?id=a1b9fa14-8813-49ac-aed4-02cbd947ca76

Keith D. Cylar AIDS Activist Awards

Housing Works, the nation's largest minority-controlled AIDS organization, is proud to present the third-annual Keith D. Cylar AIDS Activist Awards, held on Thursday April 12, 2007 at the Prince George Ballroom in New York City. Given to those who demonstrate extraordinary courage and commitment in the fight to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the award is named for the cofounder of Housing Works, a fearless AIDS activist who died of AIDS-related complications in 2004. All proceeds from the Keith D. Cylar AIDS Activist Awards go to the Keith Cylar Activist Fund, which has raised $1.5 million in support of advocacy and activis by people living with HIV/AIDS in America and around the world. For more information see: http://www.housingworks.org/awards/
Data: 
Thu, 04/12/2007 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Localização: 
15 East 27th Street
New York, NY
United States

Recipients of the Housing Works Third Annual Keith D. Cylar AIDS Activist Awards Announced

February 12, 2007 Contact: David Thorpe, Director of Communications 212-967-1500 x159 | [email protected] RECIPIENTS OF THE HOUSING WORKS THIRD ANNUAL KEITH D. CYLAR AIDS ACTIVIST AWARDS ANNOUNCED $25,000 in grants awarded to HIV-positive activists; gala benefit slated for April 12, 2007 New York, NY—Housing Works is proud to announce the winners of its third annual Keith D. Cylar AIDS Activist Awards. A benefit in their honor will take place Thursday, April 12, at 6pm, at the elegant Prince George Ballroom at 15 E. 27th Street in Manhattan. The 2007 awardees are: Gracia Violeta Ross Quiroga, Bolivian Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS, La Paz, Bolivia International AIDS Activist Award; $10,000 grant Michael Rajner, National Secretary of the Campaign to End AIDS, Fort Lauderdale, FL U.S. AIDS Activist Award; $10,000 grant Mark Hayes, Housing Works State and Federal Issues Organizer, Albany, NY Housing Works AIDS Activist Award; $5,000 grant Deborah Small, Executive Director of Break the Chains, New York, NY Virginia Shubert Courage Award The Keith D. Cylar AIDS Activist Awards are given to unheralded AIDS activists who have shown a tireless dedication to fighting the pervasive stigma and discrimination faced by people with HIV/AIDS. Their work reflects the spirit of Keith Cylar, the legendary cofounder of Housing Works who died of AIDS-related complications in 2004. Cylar battled for the rights of homeless people with HIV/AIDS and helped transform Housing Works into the nation’s largest minority-controlled, community-based AIDS organization. “When the AIDS epidemic began, Keith was committed to reaching out to a population of people that no one cared about,” says Housing Works president Charles King. “This year’s Cylar awardees have also committed to helping people with HIV who might otherwise have been left behind.” The gala benefit is only one of a three-day whirlwind of events honoring the awardees. On the agenda are Congressional visits and policy meetings in Washington, D.C.; a reception on Capitol Hill; the Cylar Awards Dance Party; and a luncheon with major foundations. ABOUT THE AWARDEES: A rape survivor who is fearlessly open about being HIV positive, Gracia Violeta Ross Quiroga overcame stigma and silence around AIDS and women’s rights in her home country of Bolivia to co-found its first PWA organization, RedBoL, the Bolivian Network of People living with HIV/AIDS. Her outspokenness launched Ms. Quiroga onto the global stage: She spoke at the XVI International AIDS Conference and served as Community Program Committee co-chair. She is on the steering committee of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS and is the South America facilitator for the Global Youth Coalition against AIDS. She also co-organized the London-based International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS. As National Secretary of the Campaign to End AIDS (C2EA), Michael Rajner has played a major role in growing a two-year old coalition dedicated to ending AIDS stigma and discrimination into a thriving national network of activists. C2EA already boasts 12 robust statewide chapters, including one in Louisiana, where the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina threatened that state’s AIDS infrastructure. In 2005, Mr. Rajner, who has had HIV since the mid-’90s, spearheaded C2EA’s “Tropical Storm” caravan, a three-week activist pilgrimage from Florida to Washington, D.C. In 2006, he secured a “Pledge to End AIDS” from major Florida elected officials. As the Housing Works State and Federal Issues Organizer in Albany, NY, since 1999, Mark Hayes was an integral member of the lobbying team that secured an historic victory: $6.5 million a year for communities of color in New York’s hardest-hit areas. Each day during the New York State legislative session, Mr. Hayes—HIV-positive since 1997—leads HIV-positive Housing Works clients and others on legislative visits focusing on the rights of people with HIV/AIDS, funding, disability and poverty issues. Mr. Hayes also facilitates participation of HIV-positive people from upstate New York in national advocacy, including the Campaign to End AIDS. He helped found the New York Transgender Coalition and holds several posts with the Ryan White HIV CARE Network of Northeast New York. Deborah Small is the executive director of Break the Chains, a nonprofit organization that seeks to build a national movement within communities of color against punitive drug policies. Given the high incidence of HIV among the incarcerated, people of color and intravenous drug users, Ms. Small has opened a vital front on the war against AIDS. She is the former director of public policy for the Drug Policy Alliance, and former legislative director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. The latter post exposed her to the problem of young African Americans incarcerated for drug offenses and helped transform her into an ardent drug-policy-reform advocate. HOUSING WORKS is the nation’s largest community-based AIDS service organization, constantly striving to improve the lives of tens of thousands of New Yorkers living with HIV/AIDS. Housing Works provides supportive housing, medical care, job training, case management, advocacy, HIV prevention, counseling and testing services. For more information about Housing Works, please visit housingworks.org Housing Works Communications Director David Thorpe can be reached at [email protected] or 212-967-1500 x159
Localização: 
New York, NY
United States

Allow drugs but control and enforce, activist says

Localização: 
Stuart, FL
United States
Publication/Source: 
The Palm Beach Post (FL)
URL: 
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/local_news/epaper/2007/02/18/m1c_mcdrugs_0218.html

Harm Reduction Coalition statement: National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Harm Reduction Coalition Statement: National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, 2007 The HIV/AIDS crisis among African Americans demands increased commitment, innovative strategies, and coordinated action by government, community-based organizations, civic and religious groups, and the African American community. African Americans make up nearly half of all AIDS cases in the United States, and over half of new HIV diagnoses. The majority of women and infants living with HIV are African American. The most striking feature of the HIV/AIDS epidemic among African Americans is the role of structural factors that drive high HIV prevalence.� A range of studies indicate that African Americans across various categories - adult and adolescent heterosexuals, men who have sex with men, injection drug users - do not have higher rates of sexual and drug-related risks than whites. African Americans are just as, if not more, likely as whites to use condoms, limit numbers of sexual partners, avoid sharing syringes, and test for HIV. Higher rates of HIV among African Americans do not reflect higher levels of risk: the narrow focus in HIV prevention on individual behavior change has failed African Americans by ignoring the structural context of poverty and homelessness, disparities in education and health care, and high rates of incarceration among blacks. The cumulative and reinforcing impact of these social and political forces create a vortex of vulnerability directly responsible for the current HIV crisis among African Americans. Solutions to the African American HIV/AIDS epidemic must ultimately recognize and redress the lethal effect of these structural disparities. Such efforts demand courage and commitment; the recommendations below require significant investments matched with political will and leadership. Yet failure to act has already exacted too high a price. We cannot afford delay. Changing the Course of the African American HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Ways Forward Reduce the high rate of incarceration among black males. Research and experience demonstrate clear links between HIV prevalence and high rates of incarceration among African Americans. Incarceration results in disruption of families and communities, social exclusion and diminished life opportunities, and pervasive despair and fatalism - an ideal environment for HIV to flourish. Draconian drug laws and law enforcement practices targeting African Americans lead to astronomical numbers of black men caught up in the criminal justice system, with catastrophic results for public health, civil rights, and social justice. We must reverse this tide by challenging mandatory minimum sentencing that removes judicial discretion, disparities in sentencing laws between crack and cocaine, and racial profiling in marijuana arrests. We must broaden alternatives to incarceration for non-violent drug-related offenses, including drug courts and diversion to treatment. Combat stigma, promote HIV testing, and reduce disparities in HIV care and treatment. Interlocking forms of stigma surrounding HIV, drug use, and sex and sexuality perpetuate a climate of silence, fear, and self-hatred that deters HIV testing and disclosure. Disparities in health care access and quality and the scarcity of non-judgmental, culturally competent HIV clinicians result in poor HIV care and greater mortality among African Americans, further reinforcing stigma and hopelessness. We must simultaneously address the cultural and systemic barriers to HIV testing, care and treatment among African Americans. Increase knowledge, diagnosis, and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. Research indicates that sexually transmitted infections facilitate HIV transmission, and that rates of these infections are higher in African Americans. Efforts to address sexually transmitted infections include education on symptom recognition, screening in community settings, and expedited partner therapy (where patients deliver treatment to their partners). Increase availability of syringe exchange programs. Syringe exchange is highly effective at preventing HIV without increasing drug use. Greater access to sterile syringes among African Americans requires new and expanded syringe exchange programs and improved access to addiction treatment. The African American community and leadership has largely set aside historical debates and divisions around syringe exchange. Now, the federal government must act to lift the federal ban on syringe exchange funding; and criminal laws against possession of syringes and drug paraphernalia must be rescinded as inconsistent with public health. Address structural determinants of risk that fuel the epidemic. We cannot successfully implement HIV interventions in the black community without first addressing the structural, social and economic factors that perpetuate marginalization and risk. We must eradicate poverty by promoting economic stability and reducing income inequalities, providing quality education and job creation, ensuring universal health care, and creating affordable housing. These efforts must be grounded in a broad political mandate to address racism, gender inequality, homophobia and classism in the United States. Harm Reduction Coalition, February 2007
Localização: 
United States

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