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Bribery at Border Worries Officials (US-Mexico)

Localização: 
United States
Publication/Source: 
Washington Post
URL: 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/14/AR2006071401525.html

book talk: Race to Incarcerate, by Marc Mauer

Washington, DC, "Race to Incarcerate," book talk with The Sentencing Project's Marc Mauer. At Politics & Prose bookstore, 5015 Connecticut Ave., NW, visit http://www.politics-prose.com for further information.
Data: 
Fri, 07/21/2006 - 8:00pm - 8:30pm
Localização: 
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20008
United States

Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids in America

Localização: 
United States
Publication/Source: 
report from Cato Institute
URL: 
http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6476

New Jersey Racial Profiling Archive

This section presents the racial profiling documents released by the New Jersey Attorney General's office on Monday, November 27, 2000, amid controversy and acrimony.

Judge Blocks Law that Changes Treatment Initiative (California)

Localização: 
United States
Publication/Source: 
Associated Press
URL: 
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/15033430.htm

Drug Policy Group Sues Governor for Altering Proposition 36 (California)

Localização: 
United States
Publication/Source: 
Associated Press
URL: 
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/15024278.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp

Tennessee Judge Throws Out State's Drug Tax Stamp Law

Publication/Source: 
Associated Press
URL: 
http://www.wbir.com/news/regional/story.aspx?storyid=35986

ACLU Wins Settlement for Goose Creek School Raid Victims

press release from the ACLU...
Landmark Settlement Reached in Notorious School Drug Raid Caught on Tape Victims of South Carolina Raid Become Only Students in America with Complete Freedom From Unconstitutional Search and Seizure FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 11, 2006 CONTACT: Daniel Berger, (917) 602-2445; [email protected] GOOSE CREEK, SC -- The American Civil Liberties Union announced today that a federal court has approved a landmark settlement in its lawsuit challenging police tactics in the high-profile drug raid of Stratford High School in Goose Creek, South Carolina. The settlement includes a consent decree that sets a new standard for students' rights to be free from unreasonable search and seizure. Absent a warrant, police will now need either to have probable cause and pressing circumstances or voluntary consent in order to conduct law enforcement activity on school grounds - effectively granting Goose Creek students the essential privacy rights enjoyed by all Americans. "Goose Creek students now have a unique place in our nation," said Graham Boyd, Director of the ACLU's Drug Law Reform Project. "They are the only students in the nation who have complete protection of their Fourth Amendment rights of search and seizure." The November 5, 2003 police raid of Stratford High School was recorded by both the school's surveillance cameras and a police camera. The tapes show students as young as 14 forced to the ground in handcuffs as officers in SWAT team uniforms and bulletproof vests aim guns at their heads and lead a drug dog to tear through their book bags. The ACLU represents 20 of the nearly 150 students caught up in the raid. The raid was initiated by the school's principal at the time, George McCrackin, who resigned shortly after the tapes surfaced on national television. The raid was authorized based on the principal's suspicion that a single student was dealing marijuana. The raid was carried out despite the suspected student being absent at the time. No drugs or weapons were found during the raid and no charges were filed. While African Americans represented less than a quarter of the high school's students, more than two-thirds of those caught up in the sweep were African American. The raid took place in the early morning hours when the school's hallways are predominantly populated with African American students whose buses -- which largely travel from different neighborhoods -- arrive before those of their white classmates. White students began to arrive during the raid and witnessed the hostile roundup and detention of their African American peers. As 16-year-old Joshua Ody, one of the students caught up in the raid, put it, "I felt like I had less rights than other people that day." Following the raid, the ACLU brought a lawsuit on behalf of students' families charging police and school officials with violating the students' right to be free from unlawful search and seizure and use of excessive force. The lawsuit demanded a court order declaring the raid unconstitutional and blocking the future use of such tactics, as well as damages on behalf of the students. In addition to recognizing students' rights to be free from unconstitutional search and seizure and restricting police tactics, the settlement establishes a $1.6 million dollar fund to compensate the students and help cover medical and counseling costs from the incident. The cost of the settlement will be paid by the city of Goose Creek, the Goose Creek Police Department, and the Berkeley County School District where the school is located, with assistance from their respective insurance companies. It is not yet known exactly how many of the nearly 150 students will accept the settlement. The offer came in response to a class-action lawsuit on behalf of 53 students, of which the ACLU's lawsuit is a part. Both sides agreed to the terms of the settlement earlier this year. The agreement received judicial approval yesterday. The ACLU's clients are: 15-year-old Carl Alexander, Jr.; 15-year-old Rodney Goodwin; 17-year-old Samuel Ody III; 17-year-old Micah Bryant; 15-year-old Marcus Blakeney; 14-year-old Danyielle Ashley Cills; 15-year-old Cedric Penn, Jr.; 14-year-old Elijah Le'Quan Simpson; 14-year-old Jeremy Bolger; 14-year-old Tristan Cills; 14-year-old Arielle Pena; 17-year-old Jalania McCullough; 17-year-old Cedric Simmons; 14-year-old Nathaniel Smalls; 15-year-old Timothy Rice; 15-year-old Shnikqua Simmons; 16-year-old Joshua Ody; 16-year-old De'Nea Dykes; 15-year-old Chernitua Bryant; and 18-year-old Rodricus Perry. A school surveillance video of the raid with narration by Principal McCrackin may be viewed at: http://stream.realimpact.net/?file=realimpact/aclu/20031205_ACLU_DrugBust.rm The essential terms of the settlement may be viewed at: www.aclu.org/drugpolicy/youth/24952lgl20060407.html
Localização: 
Goose Creek, SC
United States

Cocktail Reception with Judge James P. Gray

Please join us for a private reception with Judge James P. Gray Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed Friday, July 14, 2006 Please join us for a cocktail and hors d'oeuvres reception for James P. Gray, author of Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed and What We Can Do About It: A Judicial Indictment of the War on Drugs (Temple University Press, 2001). Gray documents the harms caused by the failed War on Drugs and evaluates the options for reversing course, from educational campaigns and drug treatment programs to strategies for taking the profit out of drug-dealing. Gray received his undergraduate degree at UCLA in 1966, served with the Peace Corps in Costa Rica from 1966 to 1968, and earned his law degree from USC in 1971. From 1972 until 1975, he was a staff judge advocate and criminal defense attorney for the U.S. Navy JAG Corps at the Naval Air Stations in Guam and Lemoore, California. He was awarded national defense, Vietnam service, and combat action ribbons. For about three years, Gray was a federal prosecutor with the United States Attorney's Office in Los Angeles. He worked five years in private practice in Newport Beach in civil litigation and was appointed by California Gov. George Deukmejian to the Santa Ana Municipal Court in December 1983. There, Gray actively sought to combat drunk driving and other alcohol-related offenses, earning a commendation from the Orange County Board of Supervisors in 1990. Gray was elevated by Deukmejian to the Orange County Superior Court in July 1989, where he received "Judge of the Year" awards in 1992 and 1995 and an honorary J.D. from Western State University College of Law. What: Free hors d'oeuvres Cash bar Books for sale When: Friday, July 14, 2006 5:30-8:00 p.m. Presentation by Judge Gray at 6:00 p.m., book signing after. Where: Millennium Knickerbocker Hotel Prince of Wales Room 163 East Walton Place Chicago, IL 60611 Register: By July 11, 2006. Admission is free, but please register in advance by calling 312/377-4000. For more information, contact The Heartland Institute at 312/377-4000 or visit our Web site at www.heartland.org.
Data: 
Fri, 07/14/2006 - 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Localização: 
163 East Walton Place
Chicago, IL 60603
United States

Don't Worry, Orrin Hatch Will Save You

When renowned R&B producer Dallas Austin was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in a Dubai prison for cocaine possession, he found an unlikely advocate in Republican Senator and Christian music composer Orrin Hatch, according to the New York Times:

The release of a music producer from a Dubai jail this week, quick on the heels of his conviction for drug possession, turns out to be a story of high-level string-pulling on the part of Mr. Hatch, the conservative Utah Republican and songwriter, along with Lionel Richie, the singer; Quincy Jones, the music entrepreneur; and an array of well-connected lawyers, businessmen and others, spanning cities and continents.

And it gets better:

A spokesman for Mr. Hatch said that the senator was a proponent of rehabilitation for drug offenders, and that he had worked to revise federal sentencing guidelines regarding cocaine, and, through legislation in 2005, had advocated treatment for nonviolent offenders and the easing of restrictions on medication to treat heroin addiction. In the statement Mr. Hatch said he was "confident that this talented young man will learn from this experience."

Sounds good to me, but Orrin Hatch? Didn’t he once advocate the death penalty for international drug trafficking, the exact crime of which Mr. Austin was accused?

Well…yes.

Clearly, he’s got some explaining to do, but let’s withhold our cries of hypocrisy for now and hope he’s seen the light. Afterall, we’ve got 500,000 non-violent drug offenders right here at home that could use some help from Utah Republican Orrin Hatch.

Localização: 
Dubai
United Arab Emirates

Drug War Issues

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