Mexican Drug War

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Police Ambush Death Toll in Mexico Rises

Location: 
Teloloapan, GRO
Mexico
The death toll from an ambush staged against police in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero has risen to eight, with one officer wounded, officials said.
Publication/Source: 
Latin America Herald Tribune (Venezuela)
URL: 
http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=367132&CategoryId=14091

U.S. Ambassador Blames Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations for Rise In Costa Rica Drug Traffic

Location: 
Costa Rica
For the first time, Costa Rica has been named a major transit point for drug trafficking, and the United States ambassador to the country, Ann S. Andrews, is blaming the Mexican drug cartels. Costa Rican officials say they lack the resources to combat drug traffickers, to guard its coastline to keep drug traffickers from using the nation to further their illicit activities.
Publication/Source: 
Inside Costa Rica (Costa Rica)
URL: 
http://www.insidecostarica.com/dailynews/2010/september/20/costarica10092003.htm

Experts: Drug Violence May Continue Past Calderón's Term

Location: 
Mexico
The drug prohibition violence that's forced about 230,000 Juárez residents to flee their homes is likely to continue for several years, experts said. Edgardo Buscaglia, a global organized crime expert, said Mexico's president does not have the political support in his country to do what is needed to make a lasting change, which is to arrest and prosecute high-level politicians and business owners who protect the drug traffickers. Last year, the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute published a study by Hal Brands, "Mexico's Narco-Insurgency and U.S. Counterdrug Policy," that states "Narcotics-driven corruption is rampant, government control of large swaths of the country is tenuous at best, and predictions that Mexico is on the way to becoming a failed state are frequent."
Publication/Source: 
El Paso Times (TX)
URL: 
http://www.elpasotimes.com/juarez/ci_16120015?source=most_emailed

Mexico Paper Seeks Ciudad Juarez Drug Gang Guidance

Location: 
Ciudad Juárez, CHH
Mexico
A Mexican newspaper in the heartland of the country's drug prohibition war has asked traffickers for guidance on whether it should publish stories on the conflict. The killing of a 21-year-old photographer last week prompted the newspaper to run a front-page editorial asking: "What do you want from us?"
Publication/Source: 
BBC News (UK)
URL: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/guns-and-grow-ops-conservatives-should-be-consistent/article1712802/

News Photographer Killed in Mexican Border City

Location: 
Ciudad Juárez, CHH
Mexico
Gunmen attacked two newspaper photographers Thursday in the drug prohibition-torn border city of Ciudad Juarez, killing one and seriously wounding the other. Mexican journalists are increasingly under siege from drug traffickers seeking to control the flow of information. The Committee to Protect Journalists, a New York-based watchdog group, said in a recent report that at least 22 Mexican journalists have been killed since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon intensified a crackdown on drug traffickers by deploying tens of thousands of troops and federal police across the country.
Publication/Source: 
The Associated Press
URL: 
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gp1DGCeRjvEx-rWqWYCnCx6LmVtwD9I9EOP00

Adios! Mexican Town's Police Force Quits Because of Danger

Location: 
Purepero, MIC
Mexico
No mas. That's what the police force in the Mexican town of Purepero said when all 45 of it members resigned en masse. Purepero isn't the first town to experience a mass resignation of officials afraid to continue their role in the nation's prohibitionist war on drug traffickers.
Publication/Source: 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram (TX)
URL: 
http://blogs.star-telegram.com/crime_time/2010/09/adios-mexican-towns-police-force-quits-because-of-danger.html

Mexico's Drug War Impacts Business

Location: 
Mexico
Mexico became a manufacturing mecca thanks, in part, to its inexpensive labor and proximity to the massive U.S. market. But there is a new reality on the ground in that country these days: a surge in violence tied to the prohibition-based war on drug traffickers that Mexico's President Felipe Calderon mounted after his election in 2006. The result has been a wave of kidnappings, extortion and murder that is threatening the country's economic health and causing multinationals to examine closely how they operate and invest in Mexico.
Publication/Source: 
Latin Business Chronicle (FL)
URL: 
http://www.latinbusinesschronicle.com/app/article.aspx?id=4526

Can Mexico "Decapitate" Drug Trafficking Organizations?

Location: 
Mexico
On the bullet-ridden streets of Mexico, weary residents ask a pertinent question about the recent arrests of some leading alleged drug traffickers -- do they really mean the Mexican government is regaining control or will they only lead to more bloodshed? GlobalPost's Ioan Grillo tracks the string of high-profile arrests, but concludes they won't end the drug war.
Publication/Source: 
CBS News (US)
URL: 
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503543_162-20016544-503543.html

Mexico Drug War Update

Mexican drug trafficking organizations make billions each year smuggling drugs into the United States, profiting enormously from the prohibitionist drug policies of the US government. Since Mexican president Felipe Calderon took office in December 2006 and called the armed forces into the fight against the so-called cartels, prohibition-related violence has killed more than 28,000 people, the government reported in August. The increasing militarization of the drug war and the arrest of dozens of high-profile drug traffickers have failed to stem the flow of drugs -- or the violence -- whatsoever. The Merida initiative, which provides $1.4 billion over three years for the US to assist the Mexican government with training, equipment and intelligence, has so far failed to make a difference. Here are a few of the latest developments in Mexico's drug war:

Wednesday, September 8

Sergio "El Grande" Villarreal
In Tegucigalpa, Honduras, police said that the Tuesday killing of 17 people was related to gangs that work for Mexican organized crime groups. Local gangs such as MS-13 and Mara 18 are known to work for Mexican cartels moving drugs through Central America or as enforcers. They are often paid in product, leading to an increase of drug consumption across Central America.

In Washington DC, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that Mexico's drug war was an insurgency resembling that of Colombia 20 years ago. Mexican government officials, most notably security spokesman Alejandro Poire, quickly responded to Clinton's remarks, calling them untrue.

Thursday, September 9

In Ciudad Juarez, 25 people were murdered across the city. This makes it the bloodiest single-day total in Ciudad Juarez in its history. The dead included seven females, three minors, and a handicapped man. In one incident, four people were shot dead after witnessing the murder of another two individuals in the Juarez Nuevo neighborhood of the city. In another incident, four people were killed after gunmen stormed a house in the El Granjero neighborhood.

Friday, September 10

In Reynosa, 85 prison inmates escaped after allegedly climbing a fence. Police immediately took over 40 guards and other prison staff into custody. Two guards were reported missing. Prison escapes have become fairly common in northern Mexico.

Sunday, September 12

In Sinaloa, four people were killed in several parts of the state.In Culiacan, a man was found shot dead with had his hands and feet bound. A note left along with the body accused the man of being an informant and a rapist. In Los Mochis, a man was found tortured and shot dead.

Monday, September 13

In Puebla, Marines captured Sergio Villareal, a high ranking cartel figure nicknamed "El Grande". Villareal is thought to be a lieutenant of cartel boss Hector Beltran-Leyva, and was fighting against a faction led by Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez, who was arrested last week. Villareal was arrested in an operation involving dozens of marines backed by armored vehicles.

Tuesday, September 14

In Matamoros, Tamaulipas, three explosions were heard near the international bridge, followed by gunfire between unknown parties that lasted up to an hour.

Across Mexico, security was stepped up for Mexico's bicentennial celebrations, which are to begin on Wednesday. Several cities, including Ciudad Juarez, have canceled celebrations due to security concerns, and many others have scaled back previously planned celebrations. In 2008, a grenade attack at an independence day celebration in Morelos, Michoacan killed eight people and wounded over 100.

Total Body Count for the Week: 134

Total Body Count for the Year: 7,862

Read the previous Mexico Drug War Update here.

Mexico

Drug War Woes Dampen Mexico's Bicentennial Party

Location: 
Mexico
Mexico is celebrating its 200th anniversary as an independent nation and the 100th anniversary of the Mexican revolution. But some of the celebrations are being scaled back as the country is being swept by a wave of drug prohibition violence.
Publication/Source: 
National Public Radio (DC)
URL: 
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129855472

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