Incarceration, Asset Forfeiture, Arrests, Informants, Police Raids, Search and Seizure

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California Sent 1,000 Drug Offenders to Fight the Forest Fire

As the Malibu wildfire nears full containment, it is very worth noting that about 1,100 male and female nonviolent drug offenders normally warehoused in California prisons were called upon to risk life and limb fighting last month’s massively devastating blazes. In fact, nearly one in eight of all firefighters who participated were drug offenders.

After a few phone calls to the state corrections department I learned that about 3,000 inmates helped to fight the wildfires, along with 6,000 non-incarcerated firefighters. Almost 4 out of every 10 inmates involved (about 37%) were nonviolent drug offenders.

Breck Wright, a non-incarcerated firefighter who has worked side by side these inmates on numerous occasions, told The Associated Press, "I think it would be very hard without them. It would really impact us…They are very effective, hardworking and are well-trained. They know what they are doing."

Boy, does this one merit examination – I mean, 1 out of every 3 firefighters relied upon were prisoners?! California is a "tough on crime," three-strikes-you're-out state, which from 1980 to 1999 experienced a 25-fold increase in the number of drug offenders sentenced to state prison. Sentencing in drug cases can be severe. For their effort, the prisoners receive $1 per hour and two days off their sentences for every day spent on the fire lines. An added benefit, of course, is the chance to break the monotony of prison life.

California has at its disposal 4,502 prison inmates fully trained to fight fires, 1,655 of whom are drug offenders. Only inmates considered "minimal custody" are permitted to participate -- violent criminals, kidnappers, sex offenders, and arsonists are all banned. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Conservation Camp Program (CCP) began in 1946 -- before the "war on drugs" kicked off in earnest and became the driving force behind California’s explosive prison growth. Saving state taxpayers more than an average of $80 million annually, the program provides three million person hours in firefighting and other emergencies, and seven million person hours in community service project work.

If the news accounts are accurate, and I don't have a basis for disputing them, the prison firefighters sought to participate in this program and feel that they are getting something out of it, both during their prison terms and after they're released. Nevertheless, the question should be asked whether it is moral to send prisoners, people who by definition are being confined against their will, into a dangerous operation in which some of them could lose their lives. Yes, they went out willingly -- they served with pride -- but why do we have them in prison in the first place? Drug use and drug sales are consensual acts, and the people engaging in them should mostly be left alone. Some drug offenders no doubt got to where they were through living screwed up lives. But even they just need help, or positive opportunities available without going to prison, not incarceration. And why aren't there more opportunities for prisoners generally, and safe ones?

If this group of people is worthy to send to risk their lives to save our lives, homes and businesses, aren't they worthy of freedom too? At a minimum they deserve better than the paltry amount of time off and chincy number of dollars that they're getting. Let's get serious -- how about pardons? After all, the non-incarcerated firefighters have stated how much they needed the prisoners' help. How many homes would have burnt down, communities been destroyed, lives lost, without them? The business owners in Socal who could have lost it all should offer as many jobs to ex-offenders as they can too.

It's sort of hard to decide whether this program is ethical or not, given how unethical is the system we have as a whole. Maybe the prisoner firefighters have served California in another way too -- by highlighting through their courage the moral bankruptcy of prohibition and the war on drugs.

Location: 
CA
United States

TV Report on Over-Incarceration in America Features Prison Art Gallery

[Courtesy of Prison Art Gallery] See the 2-minute segment now at http://prisonsfoundation.org/Prison.wmv. And, don't forget our Pre-Christmas Sale -- PRISON ART PRINTS ONLY $10 each. They are in stock and available for immediate shipment anywhere. The Prison Art Gallery in downtown Washington, DC (three blocks from the White House) has sold hundreds of paintings, drawings and crafts made by prison inmates from across America, and sent thousands of dollars to their commissary accounts and their families. At the same time we've supported victim assistance and justice advocacy groups with our share of the proceeds from these sales. Thank you for helping to make this success possible. To celebrate during this joyous season, we are placing ALL our numbered limited edition Prison Art prints (48 of them, each one 11" by 17" inches) on sale for the low price of only $10 each. Or for just a little more, we will frame them for you. You can purchase by phone, email, or at the Prison Art Gallery or our outdoor exhibit. They can be shipped anywhere in the world. To see these beautiful works of art, please see our November Art for Justice prison art catalog at http://prisonsfoundation.org/novafj.pdf . If you have any questions, please call 202-393-1511 anytime.
Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

Press Release: Hip Hop Superstar Fat Joe, Former Giants Linebacker Carl Banks, NY State Supreme Court Justice Jerome Marks among those Honored at In Arms Reach Award Gala on Thursday, November 29

[Courtesy of In Arms Reach] FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: (917) 939-5349; twheels100@gmail.com Hip Hop Superstar Fat Joe, Former Giants Linebacker Carl Banks, NY State Supreme Court Justice Jerome Marks among those Honored at In Arms Reach Award Gala on Thursday, November 29 In Arms Reach, Founded by Rockefeller Drug Law Survivor Terrance Stevens, Provides Mentoring, After-school Activities, Builds Community and Esteem for Children with Incarcerated Parents Bronx Assemblyman Rueben Diaz Jr, Hip Hop Summit Action Network President Dr. Ben Chavis and R & B Vocalist Trey Songz to Join More than 100 Others at Inspiring Event NEW YORK – Hip hop superstar Fat Joe, former Giants linebacker Carl Banks, NY State Supreme Court Justice Jerome Marks, and Dean of City College of of New York’s Sophie School of Biomedical Education, Dr. Standform A. Roman Jr., are being honored at an award Gala supporting the New York non-profit organization, In Arms Reach. For five years, In Arms Reach (IAR) has successfully functioned as a non-profit, community-based organization for art, counseling, prison visitation and academic mentoring. IAR exclusively serves urban, New York children and youth of incarcerated or formerly incarcerated parents. The event will be held Thursday, November 29th, 2007, at The Great Hall of CUNY's City College, at West 138th Street and Convent Avenue. Capitol Music Group U.S. Chairman and CEO Jason Flom is an honorary chairman of the In Arms Reach Charity Gala. Terrence Stevens serves as the program's executive director, founding In Arms Reach in 2002, while confined to a wheelchair and virtually paralyzed from the neck down due to muscular dystrophy. Since its inception, IAR staff has provided over 3,450 hours of tutoring services, hundreds of after-school mentoring sessions, and dozens of free trips to prison facilities for children to reunite with their incarcerated parents. Terrence Stevens is a survivor of, and activist against, the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws. In addition to his work with hundreds of young people with loved ones behind bars, Mr. Stevens is a leading voice in New York and Albany to change the inhumane and ineffective laws. "Children of incarcerated people face some of life's harshest challenges, including poverty, violence, limited opportunities for a good education, and a future that seems to hold little promise. The incarceration of a parent often places children at an increased risk of substance abuse, truancy, and other anti-social behaviors," explains Stevens. There are at least 2.5 million children in the United States that are denied access to their parent(s) because they parent is in prison. Terror Squad/Imperial/Capitol Music Group hip-hop veteran FAT JOE is one of those being honored for his support of children who lost their parents to incarceration. Born Joseph Cartegena, the Bronx's own Fat Joe has earned five RIAA gold certifications and two platinum certifications in the last decade, including a platinum master ringtone certification in 2007 for the smash single and video "Make It Rain." Leading the Terror Squad, Fat Joe earned an additional two gold RIAA awards for the master ringtone and digital singles of the blockbusting No. 1 pop (three weeks) and R&B/Hip Hip-Hop (seven weeks) landmark, "Lean Back." Joe's crossover smash "What's Luv," which introduced Ashanti to the pop chart, was a seven-week No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100. Fat Joe first charted in 1993 with his first solo single and video, "Flow Joe." "My community has been the foundation of everything I've ever accomplished in music and my business ventures," Fat Joe observes. "It's the role of hip-hop to give voice to the most overlooked, and it's the role of every responsible person to look into the community and be a positive force to as many as we possibly can. I'm proud to help bring awareness to this segment of youth, at a time when so many of our families in the minority community remain separated by the system." “Not only as an elected official in the Bronx, but as a personal friend of Joe’s, I believe that this recognition is long over due,” said New York State Assemblyman Ruben Diaz Jr. “Joe is someone who has come from a tough neighborhood in the Bronx and has become a world renowned entertainer and yet he finds the time to come back to his neighborhood and give back through mentoring and through resources so they can one day aspire to reach the heights that he has.” Attendees will also be treated to a live performance by R & B Atlantic Records artist Trey Songz.
Location: 
New York, NY
United States

Over 100 beautiful socially-concious gifts from the Prison Art Gallery at affordable prices!

[Courtesy of Prison Art Gallery] Beautiful prison art clothing, cups, teddy bears, totes, hoodies, tank tops, hats, notecards, calendars, and much more for immediate shipment. Over 100 beautiful socially-concious gifts from the Prison Art Gallery at affordable prices! Imprisoned artists are among the most talented artists in the world. Now we've put their beautiful work on cups, clothing, and much more so you can give gifts this year that are unique, stunning, affordable and socially concious. We have partnered with Cafe Press to bring these gorgeous items to your door. They are available in a variety of colors and styles for immediate shipment! You can order online or by phone. Take a deep breath, prepare yourself for something very special and then visit our online store at https://www.cafepress.com/jail
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Feature: On the Anniversary of Kathryn Johnston's Death, Poll Finds Most Americans Oppose Use of SWAT-Style Tactics in Routine Drug Raids

A year ago this week, 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston was gunned down by Atlanta narcotics officers when she opened fire on them as they kicked down her door in a "no-knock" drug raid. The killing has had immense reverberations in the Atlanta area, especially since it opened a window on corrupt and questionable police practices in the drug squad.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/kathrynjohnston.jpg
Kathryn Johnston
While the Johnston killing rocked the Atlanta area, it also brought the issue of aggressive drug war police tactics to the forefront. Each year, SWAT teams across the country conduct some 40,000 raids, according to estimates, many of them directed at drug offenders. The tactic, where heavily armed police in military-style attire break down doors, toss flash-bang grenades, and generally behave as if they are searching for insurgents in Baghdad, has become routine, and is the stuff of various TV reality shows.

But if the raids are popular with the viewers of the likes of DALLAS SWAT, they are not necessarily as popular with the American public. According to a poll of 1,028 likely voters commissioned by StoptheDrugWar.org (DRCNet) and conducted by Zogby International in October, a solid majority of respondents said such tactics were not justified for routine drug raids.

Here is the exact question asked: "Last year 92-year old Kathryn Johnston was killed by Atlanta police serving a drug search warrant at an incorrect address supplied by an informant. Reports show that police use SWAT teams to conduct raids as often as 40,000 times per year, often for low-level drug enforcement. Do you agree or disagree that police doing routine drug investigations in non-emergency situations should make use of aggressive entry tactics such as battering down doors, setting off flash-bang grenades, or conducting searches in the middle of the night?"

Nearly two-thirds -- 65.8% -- said police should not routinely use such tactics. With minor variations, that sentiment held across geographic, demographic, religious, ideological, and partisan lines.

Opposition to the routine use of SWAT tactics for drug law enforcement ranged from 70.7% in the West to 60.5% in the East. Residents of large cities (60.7%), small cities (71.2%), the suburbs (66.7%), and rural areas (65.0%), all opposed the routine use of SWAT tactics.

Among Democrats, 75.1% opposed the raids; among independents the figure was 65.5%. Even in the Republican ranks, a majority -- 56% -- opposed the raids. Across ideological lines, 85.3% of self-identified progressives opposed the raids, as did 80.8% of liberals, 62.9% of moderates, and 68.9% of libertarians. Even people describing themselves as conservative or very conservative narrowly opposed the routine use of SWAT tactics, with 51.5% of the former and 52.5% of the latter saying no. Among African Americans, 83% oppose the practice.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/texasraid_3.jpg
SWAT raid in Texas
"These findings don't surprise me," said University of Nebraska-Omaha criminologist Samuel Walker, a leading policing expert. "When you ask global questions about crime, people say one thing, but when the question is framed so as to clarify the practice, as this one was, people have a sense of what sort of emergency situations might call for special methods and what sort of situations are routine and could be handled without SWAT-style tactics. I find it hopeful that people seem to have such a clear sense of what is and is not appropriate," he said.

"We're pleased but also not surprised to get such a good response on this," said DRCNet executive director David Borden, who authored the question. "It's just not a hard sell to say that people shouldn't get shot, burned or traumatized in their homes when there's any other viable way of handling a situation." The organization is planning to do more, he says, and has posted an information page on the issue at http://stopthedrugwar.org/policeraids.

"If you believe that the criminal justice system is 100% perfect, you tend to support the system, but with these drug raids, there have been just too many mistakes made, too many wrong doors kicked in, too many innocent people killed," said Peter Christ, a former New York police captain who spent 20 years in policing before retiring and becoming a founding member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP). "People understand that, and they realize that grandma down in Atlanta could have been them."

The real question, Walker said, was how to translate public opinion into policy changes. "I only wish this could be translated into the political realm," he said.

For Christ, changing police practices and drug policies is a slow, even generational process of education. The movement to reform the drug laws, he said, is akin to the movement for women's rights. "None of the people who started that movement in the 1830s lived to cast a vote," he said, "but in the end, they triumphed."

In Atlanta, the outrageous conduct of the narcotics officers involved in the Johnston case has led to changes, at least for now. They told a judge they had an informant who had bought crack cocaine at Johnston's home. That was a lie. They shot at the elderly woman protecting her home 39 times after she managed to squeeze off one shot from an old pistol. They handcuffed her as she lay dying. They planted marijuana in her basement after the fact. They tried, also after the fact, to get one of their informants to say he had supplied the information, but that informant instead went to the FBI.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/utahraveraid.jpg
2005 rave raid in Utah (courtesy Portland IndyMedia)
Two of the officers involved in the killing were ordered to prison this week pending sentencing on involuntary manslaughter and civil rights violations. A third has an April trial date.

The Johnston killing has also rocked the Atlanta Police Department. The police chief disbanded the entire drug squad for months, tightened up the rules for seeking search warrants, especially "no-knock" warrants, and instituted new policies forcing narcotics officers to rotate out on a regular basis. A year-long FBI investigation into the department continues.

But across the country, the Johnston case was little more than a blip on the radar, and the SWAT-style raids continue. "I haven't noticed any real change anywhere outside of Atlanta," said Radley Balko, an editor at Reason magazine and a policy analyst specializing in civil liberties issues who authored the definitive report on the rise of the contemporary SWAT phenomenon, Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Policing in America. "The pace of these raids has been about the same this year as last."

And, as Balko noted in a FoxNews.com commentary this week, not only the raids, but the mistakes, some of them fatal, continue:

In February of this year, 16-year-old Daniel Castillo, Jr. was killed in a police raid on his family's home in Texas. Castillo had no criminal record. A SWAT officer broke open the door to the bedroom as Castillo, his sister, and her infant son were sleeping. When Castillo rose from the bed after being awoken to his sister's screams, the SWAT officer shot him in the face.

In March, police in Spring Lake, Minn., acting on an informant's tip, raided the home of Brad and Nicole Thompson. The couple was forced on the ground at gun point and warned by an officer, "If you move, I'll shoot you in the f___ing head." Police had the wrong house.

In June, a 72-year-old woman on oxygen was thrown to the ground at gunpoint in a mistaken drug raid near Durango, Colo.

Balko also pointed to errant drug raids on innocent people in Temecula, CA.; Annapolis, MD.; several incidents in Chicago, Philadelphia, and New York City; Galliano, LA.; Hendersonville, NC.; Ponderay, ID; Stockton, CA.; Pullman, WA.; Baltimore; Wilmington, DE.; Jacksonville, FL; Alton, KS; Merced County, CA; and Atlanta, GA. And that's just this year.

Turning the juggernaut around is a daunting task. It would require changes to the policies and practices of hundreds of separate law enforcement agencies around the country, and that is going to require work at the state and local level.

But there are some limited prospects for change at the federal level. In June, the House Judiciary Committee Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security held hearings on police militarization, and, thanks in part to Balko's testimony, this year's crime bill currently contains some language reflecting reforms recommended in Overkill that would limit the circumstances in which high levels of force can be used. Still, Balko said, it is unclear if that language will make it into the final bill.

At the least, Balko was able to inform committee Chair Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA) that some of the money allocated for Bill Clinton's community policing COPS program had gone to establish SWAT teams. When a woman in the gallery asked for renewed funding for COPS, Balko pointed out that fact.

"Are you telling me that the COPs grants we handed out in the 90s were actually used to start SWAT teams?" Scott asked in surprise.

Balko confirmed that was indeed the case.

"Well that's certainly not what we had in mind," Scott replied.

According to Balko, at least 40 innocent people have been killed in forced entry drug raids in recent years. No one knows how many more innocents have been injured by testosterone-crazed police or had their property wantonly destroyed in such raids. And no one is even counting how many people -- innocent, guilty, family members -- have been needlessly traumatized by the jackboot kicking the door in at 4:00am and all that follows. And most of the "guilty" parties are mere low-level offenders, and by law presumed innocent until proven guilty.

If the politicians and law enforcement listen to the public, such tactics will become a thing of the past.

As We Mark the Anniversary of the Killing of Kathryn Johnston, Poll Commissioned by DRCNet (StoptheDrugWar.org) Finds Little Support for SWAT-Style Drug Raids in Most Cases

(Visit http://stopthedrugwar.org/policeraids for further information on our poll and positions on this issue as well as links to further information.) A year ago this week, 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston was gunned down by Atlanta narcotics officers when she opened fire on them as they kicked down her door in a "no-knock" drug raid. The killing has had immense reverberations in the Atlanta area, especially since it opened a window on corrupt and questionable police practices in the drug squad. The officers involved told a judge they had an informant who had bought crack cocaine at Johnston's home. That was a lie. They shot at the elderly woman protecting her home 39 times after she managed to squeeze off one shot from an old pistol. They handcuffed her as she lay dying. They planted marijuana in her basement after the fact. They tried, also after the fact, to get one of their informants to say he had supplied the information, but that informant instead went to the FBI. Two of the officers involved in the killing were ordered to prison this week on involuntary manslaughter and civil rights violations. A third has an April trial date. The Johnston killing has also rocked the Atlanta Police Department. The police chief disbanded the entire drug squad for months, tightened up the rules for seeking search warrants, especially "no-knock" warrants, and instituted new policies forcing narcotics officers to rotate out on a regular basis. A year-long FBI investigation into the department continues. While the Johnston killing rocked the Atlanta area, it also brought the issue of aggressive drug war police tactics to the forefront. Each year, SWAT teams across the country conduct some 40,000 raids, many of them directed at drug offenders. The tactic, where heavily armed police in military-style attire break down doors, toss flash-bang grenades, and generally behave as if they are searching for insurgents in Baghdad, has become routine, and is the stuff of various TV reality shows. But, somewhat surprisingly, it isn't popular. According to a poll question of 1,028 likely voters commissioned by StoptheDrugWar.org (DRCNet), and conducted by Zogby International in October, a solid majority of respondents said such tactics were not justified for routine drug raids. Here is the exact question asked: "Last year 92-year old Kathryn Johnston was killed by Atlanta police serving a drug search warrant at an incorrect address supplied by an informant. Reports show that police use SWAT teams to conduct raids as often as 40,000 times per year, often for low-level drug enforcement. Do you agree or disagree that police doing routine drug investigations in non-emergency situations should make use of aggressive entry tactics such as battering down doors, setting off flash-bang grenades, or conducting searches in the middle of the night?" Nearly two-thirds -- 65.8% -- said police should not routinely use such tactics. With minor variations, that sentiment held across all geographic, demographic, religious, ideological, and partisan lines. Opposition to the routine use of SWAT tactics for drug law enforcement ranged from 70.7% in the West to 60.5% in the East. Residents of large cities (60.7%), small cities (71.2%), the suburbs (66.7%), and rural areas (65.0%), all opposed the routine use of SWAT tactics. Among Democrats, 75.1% opposed the raids; among independents the figure was 65.5%. Even in the Republican ranks, a majority -- 56% -- opposed the raids. Across ideological lines, 85.3% of self-identified progressives opposed the raids, as did 80.8% of liberals, 62.9% of moderates, and 68.9% of libertarians. Even people describing themselves as conservative or very conservative narrowly opposed the routine use of SWAT tactics, with 51.5% of the former and 52.5% of the latter saying no. This polling data will be the basis for a Drug War Chronicle article on Friday. We will dig a little deeper into the data, as well as the larger issue of SWAT raids for the Chronicle article. In the meantime, we have some very interesting numbers to chew on, and some public policy consequences to ponder. Our poll also received coverage on FoxNews.com this morning.
Location: 
United States

Breaking: 66% Oppose Routine SWAT Drug Raids

(visit: http://stopthedrugwar.org/policeraids) EDITORIAL ADVISORY November 20, 2007

66% Oppose Routine SWAT Drug Raids

StoptheDrugWar.org calls for Moratorium

Washington, DC: One year ago, on November 21, 2006, Atlanta police serving a drug search warrant at an incorrect address supplied by an informant killed 92-year old Kathryn Johnston. On the anniversary of her death, the organization Stop the Drug War is releasing the results of a Zogby likely voters poll which shows that 66% of Americans oppose the use of aggressive entry tactics such as battering down doors, setting off flash-bang grenades, or conducting searches in the middle of the night, in routine drug investigations in non-emergency situations. No matter how the results are broken down, by age, race, political party, income, or education, a clear majority opposes SWAT raids in routine drug investigations. The largest majority is among 18-24-year-olds, 90% of whom are against the raids. African Americans come in a close second, with 83% opposing. Conservatives come in as the most closely split groups, but still a majority opposing (52%). A majority of people with children (61%), NASCAR fans (70%), and people with members of the armed forces in their family (63%), also oppose. Stop the Drug War urges editors and columnists to join the call for a moratorium on SWAT-style drug raids in most non-emergency situations. According to some estimates, police across the US carry out as many as 40,000 SWAT raids per year. While the SWAT team's founding purpose was to enable police to respond effectively to high-intensity situations – situations involving hostages or snipers, for example – today the tactics have become commonplace in many kinds of low-level situations, including routine drug enforcement. While some defend the proliferation of SWAT raids as necessary to protect officer safety, expert analyses have found that no-knock raids instead tend to increase the dangers, to police and to persons inside the homes being entered, by escalating the situation into one filled by tension and panic. The shooting in Atlanta of 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston is the most famous example of a no-knock raid gone bad – for Johnston and for police. Three of the officers were shot and two will serve 10 years or more in prison for manslaughter. Sadly, it is not the only case. For an interactive map of botched paramilitary police raids compiled by Radley Balko, author of "Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids" and "Straight Talk: Casualties of the Corrupt Drug War (FoxNews.com 11/20/07), visit: http://www.cato.org/raidmap/. For further information on this issue from Stop the Drug War, visit http://stopthedrugwar.org/policeraids. Any possible benefit gained by entering a home in an aggressive fashion is outweighed in the vast majority of circumstances by the dangers inherent in the unnecessary brandishing of weapons, by the shock and trauma experienced by the people inside (people who are often either innocent or only low-level offenders), and the risk that the officers, mistaken for criminal invaders, will incite a confrontation. There is no excuse for more needless tragedies, not in the service of a failed drug war. It is time to put a stop to the common use of aggressive police entry tactics, and to alter the policies, legal standards and funding patterns that have made such tactics commonplace. Stop the Drug War (still known to many of our readers as DRCNet, the Drug Reform Coordination Network), is an international organization working for an end to drug prohibition worldwide and for reform of drug policy and the criminal justice system in the US. Visit http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle for the latest issue of our acclaimed weekly newsletter, Drug War Chronicle. — END —

Not one but TWO Prison Art Gallery calendars

[Courtesy of Prison Art Gallery] You asked for them, so here they are. Not one but TWO Prison Art Gallery calendars. Choose justice themes or general themes. Throughout the past year we've been planning our beautiful new 2008 calendar, selecting the finest art we've received from prison artists from across America. Trouble is, some of you wanted Justice Themes (jails, cells, prisoners, guardtowers, etc) while others requested non-justice themes (seascapes, landscapes, portraits, abstracts, etc). So we decided to publish two calendars with the help of Cafe Press, premium publishers of quality full-color calendars (and quite reasonably priced). View and order them now while they're still available. Perfect holiday gifts for you, your office, your loved ones, and your favorite judge. See and order them now at https://www.cafepress.com/jail.
Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

Video: Bad Drug Raid Traumatizes Family and Claims Life of Beloved Pet

(visit: http://stopthedrugwar.org/policeraids) Videomaker (and DRCNet member) William Aiken conducted the following interviews with Anita Woodyear and her son. Woodyear's home was invaded by a Schenectady, New York, SWAT team in September 2006. Their dog was shot dead during the raid, and Woodyear has a lawsuit pending against the Schenectady police department, in which she is being assisted by the NAACP. Click on either of the video screens to see more of Aiken's work, excerpted from "The Drug War: Mission Impossible," a DVD exploring some of the unintended consequences created by our drug policy as well as perspectives from law enforcement and activists in the field. Copies can be purchased for $25.00 paid by check or money order to: W. Aiken, P.O. Box 520, Schenectady, NY, 12301. Click here to access our "SWAT/Paramilitarization" online archive.

Prison Art Holiday Cards Ready to Be Shipped

[Courtesy of Prison Art Gallery] The holidays as a time of caring and compassion take on new meaning when you send our unique prison art Holiday cards featuring the work of talented prison inmate artists. Four colorful cards, printed and distributed by the Prisons Foundation, spotlight the work of some of our best incarcerated artists. They are sold in packs of eight for only $12 per pack. These large cards (5 ½ by 8 inches) come with matching envelopes. The backs of the cards have short profiles of the inmate artists who created them. The inside of the cards is blank. To view and order these beautiful cards online with Paypal, check or credit card , please visit http://prisonsfoundation.org/holidaycards.html. Or for telephone orders, please call 202-393-1511. Ending soon! FIRST ANNIVERSARY SALE OF PRISON ART PRINTS The Prison Art Gallery in downtown Washington, DC (three blocks from the White House) has now been in existence for a full year. We've sold hundreds of paintings, drawings and crafts made by prison inmates from across America, and sent thousands of dollars to their commissary accounts and their families. At the same time we've supported victim assistance and justice advocacy groups with our share of the proceeds from these sales. Thank you for helping to make this success possible. To celebrate our first anniversary, we are placing ALL our numbered limited edition Prison Art prints (more than 40 of them, each one 11" by 17" inches) on sale for the low low price of only $10 each. Or for just a little more, we will frame them for you. You can purchase by phone, email, or at the Prison Art Gallery or our outdoor exhibit. They can be shipped anywhere in the world. To see 40 of these beautiful works of art, please visit our November Art for Justice prison art catalog at http://prisonsfoundation.org/novafj.pdf . If you have any questions, please call 202-393-1511 anytime.
Location: 
United States

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