Medical Marijuana

RSS Feed for this category

ASA's Medical Marijuana in the News: Week Ending 6/22/07

RHODE ISLAND: Medical Marijuana Law Made Permanent NEW YORK: Limited Medical Marijuana Bill Debated MICHIGAN: Initiative Proponents Gather Signatures CONNECTICUT: Governor Defies Public Support, Vetoes FEDERAL: More Prison Time Possible for Patient CALIFORNIA: Implementation Still a Struggle DISPENSARIES: Regulation at Issue in California CANADA: Health Officials Try to Sway Doctors -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- RHODE ISLAND: Medical Marijuana Law Made Permanent State lawmakers overrode the Rhode Island governor’s veto this week by an overwhelming margin, making permanent the state law protecting patients there. The current law was set to expire at the end of the month due to a “sunset provision,” but the success of the program convinced nearly everyone but the governor that it should be extended. R.I. adopts permanent medical marijuana program Associated Press Rhode Island lawmakers voted Thursday to permanently extend a program allowing the chronically ill to possess and smoke marijuana for pain relief. Senate overrides medical marijuana veto Associated Press The state Senate overrides Governor Carcieri's veto of a medical marijuana program. A spokesman for Senate President Joseph Montalbano says the vote was 29 to four. House lawmakers are planning a similar vote later this week. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW YORK: Limited Medical Marijuana Bill Debated The medical marijuana measure currently being considered by New York lawmakers would remove state criminal penalties for a few of their most seriously ill constituents. But the limitations on those covered mean that many patients using marijuana on their doctors’ advice would still be considered criminals. The public supports letting doctors decide what is appropriate treatment for their patients, but some politicians continue to think they know better than doctors, voters or patients. Medical Marijuana: New York is Waiting to Inhale by Tom Precious, Buffalo News (NY) Joel Peacock, a registered member of the Conservative Party, has little use for liberal politicians. Yet he is adding his voice to those of physicians, nurses, home care and hospice workers, and patient advocates who are pushing for New York to become the 13th state in the nation to permit the medical use of marijuana. Pot war in Brooklyn! by Matthew Lysiak, The Brooklyn Paper Two Brooklyn lawmakers — one a former Soviet engineer, the other a former police officer — are hashing it out over a bill to make marijuana legal for medicinal use. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MICHIGAN: Initiative Proponents Gather Signatures Voters in Michigan have been doing all they can to be heard at the state Capitol. So far five cities – Ann Arbor, Detroit, Flint, Ferndale, and Traverse City – have passed local initiatives supporting medical marijuana. Now advocates are trying to place a statewide measure on the ballot. If passed, it would go to the legislature for consideration. Since local initiatives have all passed by margins between 60 and 74%, approval of the statewide measure looks likely. Activists petition for medical marijuana in Michigan by Eric Czarnik , Lansing City Pulse (MI) Rochelle Lampkin of Detroit doesn’t drink alcohol, smoke tobacco or use drugs for recreation. But about once a month, she takes in a substance that she says benefits her quality of life — even though it’s against the law. She uses marijuana for medicinal purposes. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONNECTICUT: Governor Defies Public Support, Vetoes With 83% of voters supporting the medical marijuana bill passed by the state legislature, the decision of the governor to veto it seems odd. She cites concern over the implementation of the program – how patients would obtain their medicine – and says she doesn’t want people relying on illegal sources. A comprehensive program that makes cannabis legally available is preferable – something like the dispensary system that is being created in California -- but all the veto does is make sure sick and suffering patients remain criminals in the eyes of the state. Rell Vetoes Bill To Legalize Medical Marijuana by Mark Pazniokas, Hartford Courant (CT) Gov. M. Jodi Rell vetoed legislation today that would have legalized the medical use of marijuana, saying that the bill was a well-intended, but flawed attempt to alleviate suffering. Rell Delivers Veto On Bill To Allow For Medical Marijuana by Ted Mann, The Day (CT) Cancer survivor Gov. M. Jodi Rell has said she is sympathetic to those who want to give those suffering from the disease and the side effects of its invasive treatments the right to smoke marijuana to ease their pain, nausea and weakness. But Rell blocked that effort Tuesday when she vetoed a bill allowing the “palliative use” of marijuana, saying her compassion for victims of cancer and other chronic and terminal conditions did not trump her reservations over a bill that would have put those patients in violation of federal drug laws. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FEDERAL: More Prison Time Possible for Patient A medical marijuana patient in California may be forced to return to federal prison. One of the first state-legal patients to face federal prosecution, Bryan Epis was sentenced to 10 years in jail for growing marijuana in his basement for himself and a few other patients. He was released pending the resolution of other legal challenges to federal law, but now faces return. Caught in the middle by Robert Speer, Chico News and Review (CA) After a decade of legal wrangling and more than two years in prison, med-pot pioneer Bryan Epis faces a return to prison -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CALIFORNIA: Implementation Still a Struggle A decade of legality has not resolved basic questions about how patients should obtain the cannabis their doctors recommend, nor how law enforcement should treat them and those who help them. Federal officials continue to interfere around the state, and there are wide disparities in how local law enforcement responds. Government Shows No Compassion for Medical Pot Consumption by Patrick McCartney and Martin A. Lee, AlterNet More than ten years after California's Compassionate Use Act was passed by voters, state and local officials are still collaborating with federal law enforcement to undermine it. Medical marijuana violation arrests soar in Siskiyou by Paul Boerger, Mt. Shasta News (CA) Siskiyou County Public Defender Lael Kayfetz has been with the department for nearly two years and she says in the last year arrests and citations for violation of medical marijuana recommendation holders has “quadrupled.” -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DISPENSARIES: Regulation at Issue in California While court cases and legislative action have made clear that patients in California may legally operate as collectives to distribute medical marijuana, local officials continue to wrestle with what that means for their constituents and communities. The editorial from Ontario makes clear that experience with just one patient can go a long way toward convincing people of the important role dispensaries can play in the lives of the seriously ill. ASA’s report on dispensary regulations around the state show they are working. See it at http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org/dispensaryreport. For ill, medical marijuana ought to be obtainable EDITORIAL, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin (Ontario, CA) We find Claremont City Council's attitude refreshing amid all the moratoriums and bans on medical marijuana dispensaries being passed. If Claremont's leaders have the guts and the smarts to adopt an ordinance that allows patients with true medical need to obtain legal marijuana - as the state's voters intended - while minimizing the possibility of abuse, more power to them. Pot club permits stuck in limbo by Adam Martin, San Francisco Examiner As the deadline nears for San Francisco medicinal marijuana dispensaries to come into compliance with strict new city codes, no club in The City has received an official permit. Planners oppose marijuana dispensaries Inland Valley Daily Bulletin (Ontario, CA) The city Planning Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday to recommend that the city ban medical-marijuana dispensaries as a land use. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CANADA: Health Officials Try to Sway Doctors Thanks to a supreme court ruling in Canada, patients there have been able to get better access through their government than Americans can. But Canadian officials continue to resist both the ruling of the court and the consensus of medical science. With other medications, health officials are content to defer questions of dosage to the opinion of doctors, who are after trained to make such decisions. Health Canada moves to keep daily medical marijuana consumption low by Dean Beeby, Canadian Press Health Canada has been contacting doctors who prescribe medical marijuana for their government-approved patients, advising them to keep the dosages low. Some users say that not only violates doctor-patient confidentiality, it's also wrong for bureaucrats to make judgments about the medical needs of people they've never seen. ___________________________________ MORE ABOUT AMERICANS FOR SAFE ACCESS Find out more about ASA at http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org. More medical marijuana news summaries can be seen at http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?list=type&type=122.
Location: 
United States

Pot growers defend crop

Location: 
Azusa, CA
United States
Publication/Source: 
San Gabriel Valley Tribune (CA)
URL: 
http://www.sgvtribune.com/news/ci_6221762

Medical marijuana user sues over state policy

Location: 
Denver, CO
United States
Publication/Source: 
9News (CO)
URL: 
http://www.9news.com/news/local/article.aspx?storyid=72526

Medical Marijuana: Rhode Island Legislature Overrides Veto to Make Law Permanent

Rhode Island legislators voted overwhelmingly this week to override Gov. Donald Carcieri's (R) veto of a bill that would make the state's medical marijuana law permanent. On Wednesday, the Senate voted 29-4 to override, and on Thursday, the House followed suit with a lopsided 58-11 vote.

Legislators last year passed a medical marijuana -- also vetoed by Carcieri and overridden -- but that law included a sunset provision. Without action by the legislature, it would have expired on June 30.

"The fact that this override passed by an even larger margin than the original override last year says everything you need to know about how well the law has worked, and how completely uncontroversial it's been," said Ray Warren, director of state policies for the Marijuana Policy Project.

The national group worked with state residents organized into the Rhode Island Patient Advocacy Coalition to achieve victory in the legislature. "Our legislature has stood with the scientific and medical community to ensure that I and hundreds of other seriously ill Rhode Islanders don't have to live in fear," said Rhonda O'Donnell, RN, a multiple sclerosis patient who was the first to sign up for Rhode Island's program. "But the job won't be finished until every patient in every state who needs medical marijuana has complete protection. It's time for every state legislature and the US Congress to change cruel and unscientific laws that criminalize the sick."

Medical Marijuana: Connecticut Governor Vetoes Bill

Connecticut Gov. Jodi Rell (R) Wednesday vetoed a bill that would have allowed for the use of medical marijuana in the Constitution State. The Compassionate Use Act (HB 6715) passed the state Senate by a vote of 23-13 after clearing the House an 89-58 vote weeks earlier, both of which were wide -- but not quite veto-proof -- margins.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/jodirell.jpg
Gov. Rell showed great cruelty to patients with her veto of Connecticut's medical marijuana bill.
To override the gubernatorial veto, bill supporters would need 24 votes in the Senate and 101 votes in the House. None of the bill's legislative sponsors have made any public noises about attempting an override. Lead backer Rep. Penny Bacchiochi (R-Somers) was quoted in an Associated Press article as saying she would work with the governor to seek compromise legislation next year.

In her veto message, Rell cried crocodile tears for Connecticuters who could benefit from the therapeutic use of cannabis. "While the bill seeks to provide relief to patients suffering from severe and persistent pain, the bill also requires that patients or primary caregivers engage in illegal activity to use marijuana."

"I am not unfamiliar with the incredible pain and heartbreak associated with battling cancer and I have struggled with the decision about signing or vetoing this bill," Rell continued. "I completely sympathize with the well-intentioned goal of alleviating pain and suffering, but legal alternatives are available, the bill forces law abiding citizens to seek out drug dealers to make a purchase, and there is no provision for monitoring use or proof of its effectiveness."

Rell also worried that signing the bill would "send the wrong message" to young people and noted that few doctors prescribe marijuana because it is a violation of federal law. The bill would have allowed doctors to issue recommendations, not prescriptions.

The bill would have allowed adult residents suffering from diseases including AIDS, MS, and cancer to grow marijuana at home once they had a recommendation and had registered with the state.

While Bacchiochi expressed some sympathy for the governor's soul-searching on whether to sign the bill, State Senator Andrew J. McDonald (D-Stamford), the deputy majority leader, said after the veto was announced that Rell had not raised her concerns when the bill had been drafted. "In many ways, a gubernatorial veto represents a failure of leadership by the governor rather than an exercise of leadership," McDonald said. "The governor clearly stands apart from the vast majority of her citizens in opposing this legislation."

After the bill's passage, patients, doctors, family members and advocates mounted a massive letter and phone call campaign urging the governor to sign the bill. The governor was receiving hundreds of phone calls and letters every day in support of medical marijuana, including from medical, legal, and health experts from across the country.

"The governor's veto message shows that she's grasping for straws," said Lorenzo Jones, executive director of A Better Way Foundation, which rallied support for the legislation. "She said previously that she'd support the bill if it was only for terminally ill patients, because clearly other treatments are not sufficient. Now she says she's vetoing the bill because it's still illegal under federal law, even though over 99% of all marijuana arrests are under state law. She has been so evasive on this that it makes one wonder if she hasn't gotten a call from Washington. Is she taking the advice from the worst administration in history over the demands of 83% of Connecticut residents?"

"It's unconscionable that Rell would ignore all the science to veto this bill," said Gabriel Sayegh, project director at the Drug Policy Alliance, which also pushed for its passage. "The medical efficacy of marijuana is unassailable. As a result of this veto, are patients who use marijuana to relieve their pain and suffering still considered criminals?"

The answer is yes, at least until next year.

Breaking: Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Law Now Permanent

I've just been informed that the Rhode Island House has passed medical marijuana again, this time making the law permanent.

RI Gov. Donald Carcieri has twice vetoed this bill, and now looks doubly foolish. Not only has he attempted to stand between deserving patients and their medicine, but he has failed dramatically and repeatedly.

This great victory is testament to the wisdom and compassion of the Rhode Island House and Senate, as well as the hard work of countless patients, activists, and organizations who fought and won this unnecessarily drawn-out battle.

The political future of medical marijuana remains bright as ever before.

Update: Jon Perri at DARE Generation Diary credits the major players.

Location: 
United States

Judge disagrees with high priest

Location: 
Canada
Publication/Source: 
The Comox Valley Record (Canada)
URL: 
http://www.comoxvalleyrecord.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=8&cat=23&id=1009012&more=0

DPA Press Release: Governor Rell Ignores Will of Voters and Legislators and Vetoes Medical Marijuana Bill

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 19, 2007 CONTACT: Lorenzo Jones, T: (860) 270-9586 or Gabriel Sayegh, T: (646) 335-2264 Governor Rell Vetoes Medical Marijuana Bill, Changing Her Reasons for Opposition to Issue Yet Again Compassionate Use Bill Would Have Protected Patients With Debilitating Illnesses From Arrest, Prosecution Patients, Community Members Ask: Governor Rell, As a Cancer Survivor, How Do You Sleep At Night While Patients In Our State Continue to Be Criminalized for Seeking Relief? HARTFORD, CT—Today, Governor M. Jodi Rell vetoed HB 6715, the Compassionate Use Act. The bill would have allowed certain patients with debilitating illnesses to use marijuana for medical purposes as recommended by their physician. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 23-13 after clearing the House of Representatives by an 89-58 vote weeks earlier, both of which were wide margins. By passing HB 6715, the Legislature ended a five-year legislative battle to win medical marijuana in a state that has overwhelming public support for the issue. A 2004 University of Connecticut poll found that 83 percent of Connecticut residents support the medical use of marijuana. Dozens of community organizations, including the CT Nurses Association, support allowing patients to access medical marijuana when recommended by their physician. “I am just 32 years old and yet due to my medical condition I feel as if, at times, I am 92,” said Joshua Warren, a patient in Wilton, CT, who suffers from chronic neurological Lyme disease. “I did not ask for this condition nor would I wish any of my pain and other symptoms on anyone else. If Gov. Rell had any compassion for people like me who are suffering with horrible pain and other debilitating illnesses, she would have signed this bill.” After the bill’s passage, patients, doctors, family members and advocates mounted a massive letter and phone call campaign urging the Governor to sign the bill. The Governor was receiving hundreds of phone calls and letters every day in support of medical marijuana, including from medical, legal, and health experts from across the country. “The Governor’s veto message shows that she’s grasping for straws,” said Lorenzo Jones, executive director of A Better Way Foundation. “She said previously that she’d support the bill if it was only for terminally ill patients, because clearly other treatments are not sufficient. Now she says she’s vetoing the bill because it’s still illegal under federal law, even though over 99% of all marijuana arrests are under state law. She has been so evasive on this that it makes one wonder if she hasn’t gotten a call from Washington. Is she taking the advice from the worst administration in history over the demands of 83% of Connecticut residents?” Thousands of Connecticut residents live with crippling pain, are suffering with cancer and HIV/AIDS, or other debilitating ailments. HB 6715 would have allowed Connecticut residents with certain debilitating medical conditions to cultivate and use marijuana for medical purposes when recommended by a practicing physician. “It’s unconscionable that Rell would ignore all the science to veto this bill,” said Gabriel Sayegh, project director at the Drug Policy Alliance. “The medical efficacy of marijuana is unassailable pain and suffering and are, as a result of this veto, still considered criminals?” Currently, there are 12 states with medical marijuana laws. New Mexico passed its medical marijuana bill in March. Last month, the Rhode Island legislature voted to make their state law permanent, and last week Vermont’s legislature voted to expand their medical marijuana law. Other medical marijuana bills are currently under consideration in New Jersey, New York and Alabama. Dawn Fuller Ball, President of A Better Way Foundation said, “In Governor Rell’s veto letter, she admits that the current legal pharmacology alternatives to medical marijuana are insufficient and that the State law enacted in 1981 is unworkable, yet the Governor continues to choose politics over patients.” Background Info: Governor Rell is Saying NO to Medical Marijuana When Connecticut Says YES: - CT's voters voted YES (83% approval rating in polls from UCONN polls to media polls) - Five Separate Legislative Committees voted YES - The House of Representatives voted YES (89-58) - The Senate voted YES (23-13) - This is a Republican sponsored bill (By some of most respected Republicans in the House and Senate) - The Black and Latino Caucus supports this bill (The President and Treasurer met with Rell's staff) - Faith Based Institutions voted YES (National and local pastors and Bishops have contacted Governor Rell) - Doctors, nurses, patients, and caregivers testified, wrote letters and called the Governor’s office on behalf of medical marijuana. ###
Location: 
Hartford, CT
United States

ASA's Medical Marijuana in the News: Week Ending 6/15/07

RESEARCH: Marijuana May Be Topical Allergy Cure ASA IN THE NEWS: Patients’ Right to Grow as Groups Tested in Court NEW YORK: Advocates Change Governor’s Mind on Medical Marijuana MICHIGAN: Advocates Seek Signatures for Medical Marijuana Initiative CONNECTICUT: Medical Marijuana Bill on Governor’s Desk COLORADO: Limits on Plant Numbers Challenged DISPENSARIES: Federal and Local Action in California -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- RESEARCH: Marijuana May Be Topical Allergy Cure Few remember that cannabis was a popular remedy in the early twentieth century, commonly prescribed by doctors and widely available at pharmacies in several forms, including oral tinctures and topical salves. Scientists are rediscovering the potential of cannabis preparations for treating skin problems. Cannabis helps treat allergic reactions New Zealand Herald A cannabis folk remedy has been resurrected by scientists who found that active ingredients in the drug reduce allergic reactions. Extracts from the hemp plant were traditionally used to treat inflammation and could be bought from chemists in the early part of the 20th century. New frontier for medical cannabis -- topical pot by Kavita Mishra, San Francisco Chronicle Skin allergies may be the next reason to use marijuana -- a topical form, at least. Scientists have long suspected that marijuana, used for recreational purposes and to help fight chronic pain, nausea and even some mental disorders like anxiety and depression, also had anti-inflammatory effects in the body. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ASA IN THE NEWS: Patients’ Right to Grow as Groups Tested in Court The most seriously ill patients must rely on others to grow medical marijuana, something California’s law recognizes with a “caregiver” provision. But many patients have also organized as cultivation collectives to help each other, which the state legislature expressly made legal in 2003. A new court case may help better define the responsibilities of law enforcement when dealing with those patient collectives. Medical marijuana suit could break new ground by Heather Hacking, Oroville Mercury-Register A Superior Court case heard in Chico is raising the question whether a medicinal marijuana case can be tried in civil court — a step that would open up law enforcement to fighting lawsuits from people who have plants confiscated or destroyed. Collectives were OK'd in March 2002 by the Legislature, said Joe Elford, a lawyer for Americans For Safe Access, an advocacy group for medical marijuana. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW YORK: Advocates Change Governor’s Mind on Medical Marijuana Ten years of tireless work by medical marijuana patients and advocates has made a difference in New York. The Governor himself has had his mind changed by the education he has gotten from patients and doctors. Myths and misinformation are the biggest barriers standing between many patients and a safe, effective treatment option. Legislators Grapple Over How to Legalize Medical Marijuana Use by Danny Hakim and Michael Grynbaum, New York Times Gov. Eliot Spitzer and legislative leaders said this week that the use of marijuana for medical purposes should be made legal in New York State. But whether all involved can come to an agreement on how that should be done with one week left in the legislative session remains in significant doubt. NY Pols consider 'medical marijuana' by James T. Madore, NewsDay (NY) Legalizing marijuana for medical use appeared Wednesday to gain momentum here with lawmakers and then lose it as the legislature's two houses disagreed over implementation. Medical Marijuana Legislation Passes State Assembly by John Abraham, Long Island Press A new measure which would allow patients experiencing pain to ingest and grow marijuana cleared the state Assembly Wednesday in a 92-52 vote. The controversial measure is currently being debated between Democrats and Republicans in the state Senate. Spitzer is open to New York legalizing medicinal marijuana by Tom Precious, Buffalo News (NY) Gov. Eliot L. Spitzer, in a reversal of a campaign position, said Tuesday he could support legislation legalizing the use of marijuana for certain medicinal purposes. In a debate last summer, Spitzer said he opposed medical marijuana. Now he said he is “open” to the idea after being swayed by advocates in the past couple of months. Medical marijuana bill passed in Assembly Capital News 9 (NY) The state Assembly passed a bill legalizing medical use of marijuana Wednesday, after about a decade of attempts to approve similar legislation in the state. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MICHIGAN: Advocates Seek Signatures for Medical Marijuana Initiative Michigan's groundspring of public support is forcing lawmakers to recognize that medical marijuana is an option people want for themselves and their families. A flurry of local initiatives is being followed by a statewide measure that will be put to voters this fall, if organizers can get the required signatures. If passed, the bill will go to the legislature; if state lawmakers fail to act, it will return to voters. Prescription pot by Curt Guyette, Detroit Metro Times Rochelle Lampkin knows she's breaking the law when she lights a joint and takes a few tokes, but she doesn't feel like a criminal. The 48-year-old Detroit grandmother has multiple sclerosis, and an associated condition called optic neuritis, an excruciatingly painful inflammation of the optic nerve. It hits her a few times a month. Medical pot: Petition drive can put issue where it belongs - with voters by EDITORIAL, Lansing State Journal (MI) Six years ago, Michigan saw petition gatherers advocating a statewide vote on recreational use of marijuana. It was a bad idea at the time, as an LSJ editorial stated. It's still a bad idea, as Lansing-based pollster Ed Sarpolus affirmed in noting full legalization is still a no-go with state voters. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONNECTICUT: Medical Marijuana Bill on Governor’s Desk Bipartisan support got a medical marijuana bill to the desk of the governor in Connecticut. She is being urged to sign it by her constituents and even a celebrity patient. Polling by the University of Connecticut shows 83% of the state wants to see the law enacted. MS Sufferer Montel Williams Makes the Case for Medical Pot by Montel Williams, AlterNet Editor's note: Connecticut may become the 13th state in the country to permit the use of marijuana for medical purposes. After legislation was passed in the state legislature this month, it is now up to Gov. M. Jodi Rell. What follows is a letter of support from Montel Williams. Marijuana Law in Connecticut Gains Ground by Stacey Stowe, New York Times Seventeen years ago, Mark Braunstein dived 60 feet off a footbridge into a river, landed wrong and became a paraplegic. A librarian at Connecticut College, Mr. Braunstein, 55, walks with the aid of crutches and leg braces. He smokes marijuana every three days or so to control the pain and spasms in his feet that would otherwise immobilize him. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- COLORADO: Limits on Plant Numbers Challenged State laws that impose arbitrary limits on the number of plants or medicine patients can possess are not realistic. With other medications, we let doctors decide together with their patients what treatment levels are appropriate. In addition, differences in cultivation techniques mean some grow many small plants indoors while others grow a few larger ones outdoors. ASA is working with Sensible Colorado to help make state policy more reasonable. Veteran challenges arrest under medical-marijuana law Associated Press A former Marine who said marijuana helps him deal with injuries suffered during Operation Desert Storm is challenging the state’s medical marijuana law. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DISPENSARIES: Federal and Local Action in California Many California state and local officials have recognized that dispensaries provide an invaluable service to patients while allowing oversight by the community. The state legislature made provisions for dispensing collectives in 2003, and local officials around the state have been implementing or considering regulations for their operation. (See AmericansForSafeaccess.org/DispensaryReport) A study by ASA found that regulations are working well. But that has not stopped the federal government from trying to intervene in local attempts to help patients. Federal agents search dispensary in Pomona by Monica Rodriguez, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency - assisted by Pomona police officers - served a search warrant Wednesday afternoon at a medical marijuana dispensary in the eastern end of the city. D.A. rejects marijuana raid case Jewish Journal The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office has rejected a case against the operator of a Van Nuys medical marijuana pharmacy that was raided in April by police who allegedly desecrated a mezuzah at the shop. New assistant DA sees no change in dispensary policy by K. Kaufmann, The Desert Sun When it comes to medical marijuana dispensaries, the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office will be standing by the white paper opposing dispensaries issued by former District Attorney Grover Trask last fall. City studying marijuana dispensary ban by Nisha Gutierrez, Whittier Daily News (CA) The Baldwin Park City Council is taking steps to consider placing a temporary ban on medical marijuana dispensaries, officials said. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MORE ABOUT AMERICANS FOR SAFE ACCESS Find out more about ASA at http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org. More medical marijuana news summaries can be seen at http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?list=type&type=122.
Location: 
United States

Medical Marijuana Measure Falls With Connecticut Governor’s Veto

Location: 
Stamford, CT
United States
Publication/Source: 
The New York Times
URL: 
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/20/nyregion/20rell.html

Drug War Issues

Criminal JusticeAsset Forfeiture, Collateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Court Rulings, Drug Courts, Due Process, Felony Disenfranchisement, Incarceration, Policing (2011 Drug War Killings, 2012 Drug War Killings, 2013 Drug War Killings, 2014 Drug War Killings, Arrests, Eradication, Informants, Interdiction, Lowest Priority Policies, Police Corruption, Police Raids, Profiling, Search and Seizure, SWAT/Paramilitarization, Task Forces, Undercover Work), Probation or Parole, Prosecution, Reentry/Rehabilitation, Sentencing (Alternatives to Incarceration, Clemency and Pardon, Crack/Powder Cocaine Disparity, Death Penalty, Decriminalization, Defelonization, Drug Free Zones, Mandatory Minimums, Rockefeller Drug Laws, Sentencing Guidelines)CultureArt, Celebrities, Counter-Culture, Music, Poetry/Literature, Television, TheaterDrug UseParaphernalia, ViolenceIntersecting IssuesCollateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Violence, Border, Budgets/Taxes/Economics, Business, Civil Rights, Driving, Economics, Education (College Aid), Employment, Environment, Families, Free Speech, Gun Policy, Human Rights, Immigration, Militarization, Money Laundering, Pregnancy, Privacy (Search and Seizure, Drug Testing), Race, Religion, Science, Sports, Women's IssuesMarijuana PolicyGateway Theory, Hemp, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Marijuana Industry, Medical MarijuanaMedicineMedical Marijuana, Science of Drugs, Under-treatment of PainPublic HealthAddiction, Addiction Treatment (Science of Drugs), Drug Education, Drug Prevention, Drug-Related AIDS/HIV or Hepatitis C, Harm Reduction (Methadone & Other Opiate Maintenance, Needle Exchange, Overdose Prevention, Safe Injection Sites)Source and Transit CountriesAndean Drug War, Coca, Hashish, Mexican Drug War, Opium ProductionSpecific DrugsAlcohol, Ayahuasca, Cocaine (Crack Cocaine), Ecstasy, Heroin, Ibogaine, ketamine, Khat, Marijuana (Gateway Theory, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Medical Marijuana, Hashish), Methamphetamine, New Synthetic Drugs (Synthetic Cannabinoids, Synthetic Stimulants), Nicotine, Prescription Opiates (Fentanyl, Oxycontin), Psychedelics (LSD, Mescaline, Peyote, Salvia Divinorum)YouthGrade School, Post-Secondary School, Raves, Secondary School