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ASA's Medical Marijuana in the News: Week of 3/23

FEDERAL: Raich Medical Marijuana Ruling Draws Criticism CONNECTICUT: Medical Marijuana Bill Supported MINNESOTA: State Medical Marijuana Measure Moves Forward RHODE ISLAND: Medical Marijuana Law Needs Action NEW MEXICO: Lawmakers’ Courage Lauded WASHINGTON: Limits of Medical Marijuana Law Questioned CALIFORNIA: Medical Marijuana ID Card Protections Clarified DISPENSARIES: Support from Officials with Experience __________________________________________ FEDERAL: Raich Medical Marijuana Ruling Drawing More Criticism Some take issue with the legal reasoning underpinning an appellate court’s ruling that Angel Raich, a terminally ill California who has been seeking protection from federal prosecution, cannot claim medical necessity for the purpose of an injunction. But all agree that keeping life-saving medicine from anyone must be wrong. Marijuana as medicine a decision for doctors EDITORIAL, The Republican (MA) Under the supervision of a physician, with adequate controls to prevent its abuse or improper use, marijuana is a proven, effective treatment for some seriously ill patients. The nation's lawmakers should look in their own medicine cabinets where they might find prescription drugs far more toxic and dangerous than marijuana. The Case of Angel Raich by Jon Carroll, Columnist, San Francisco Chronicle I think the federal government, in this case, is no better than a thug. I think that prosecutors who go after medical marijuana cases are criminals, morally if not actually. I think all the people who have participated in giving people ridiculous three-strike prison sentences for marijuana-related crimes are hypocrites and fools. It's an obvious and complete injustice. They all know it. They should all be ashamed of themselves. U.S. Judges Kill the Ninth Amendment by Fred E. Foldvary, Editorial, The Progress Report The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed on March 14 that the Ninth Amendment to the United States is now null and void, and that the federal government of the United States of America has no moral legitimacy. The judges did not explicitly express those statements in their ruling, but that is the implication. The case involved a woman whose life, according to her doctor, can only be preserved with medical marijuana. The judges ruled that the federal government may nevertheless prosecute her for violating federal laws regarding drugs. __________________________________________ CONNECTICUT: Medical Marijuana Bill Supported Emmy-award winning talkshow host Montel Williams lent support to a bill advancing through the Connecticut legislature. The former marine has been outspoken about how marijuana has helped him fight the symptoms of MS. Montel Williams makes emotional plea for Conn. medical marijuana bill by Susan Haigh, Associated Press Syndicated television talk show host Montel Williams choked back tears Friday as he urged Connecticut lawmakers to pass a bill legalizing marijuana use for medical purposes. Conn. lawmakers resurrect bill to allow medical use of marijuana by Susan Haigh, Associated Press A move to legalize marijuana for people suffering from certain medical problems cleared its first legislative hurdle Wednesday, giving hope to those who've been pushing for the bill for several years. Conn. judiciary panel OKs medical marijuana by Ken Dixon, Connecticut Post Connecticut would become the 13th state to let gravely ill people use marijuana, under legislation overwhelmingly approved Wednesday in the Judiciary Committee after a brief debate. __________________________________________ MINNESOTA: State Medical Marijuana Measure Moves Forward Committee by committee, state lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow Minnesotans to use marijuana on their doctors’ advice. Public opinion polls there show strong support for protecting patients. Minn. medical marijuana bill takes another step forward by Joe Fryer, KARE 11 (Minneapolis) A proposal to allow seriously ill patients to use marijuana with their doctors' permission is working its way through the state legislature. Medical Marijuana: Minnesota Bill Approved By Second House Panel Drug War Chronicle Members of a Minnesota House committee Monday voted to approve a medical marijuana bill despite the objections of law enforcement. The House Public Safety and Civil Law Committee approved the bill, HF655, on an 11-8 vote. It has already passed the House Health and Human Services Committee and is now headed for the House Finance Committee. __________________________________________ RHODE ISLAND: Medical Marijuana Law Needs Action The “sunset clause” Rhode Island lawmakers added to their medical marijuana bill means that the protections it affords will expire without further action by the legislature. By all accounts the program has been successful, with only one problem reported. ASA's Rhode Island Campaign for Safe Access is working to educate the community and legislators. Medical marijuana advocates ask to make law permanent Associated Press Medical marijuana advocates ask legislators to permanently legalize medicinal marijuana in Rhode Island. __________________________________________ NEW MEXICO: Lawmakers’ Courage Lauded The reversal of fortune for patients in New Mexico – with the legislature defeating a medical bill one week and then passing another the next – has opinionmakers commending the officials who found the courage to act. Editorial: Applaud lawmakers for medical pot bill EDITORIAL, Albuquerque Tribune It took years, a lot of wrangling and considerable grief, but finally New Mexico will join 11 other progressive and caring states that allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes. __________________________________________ WASHINGTON: Limits of Medical Marijuana Law Questioned The purpose of medical marijuana laws is clear: to protect patients from prison. The details of how patients are to comply with state medical laws can cause problems however, with some patients excluded on technicalities or issues of timing. Busted Pullman man fighting pot conviction by Courtney Adams, Daily Evergreen Nearly three years after being busted for marijuana possession, a Pullman man is still appealing a court decision that found him guilty of the crime. Loren R. Hanson grew marijuana plants after receiving information from his doctor, intending to use the marijuana to treat his glaucoma, his lawyer said. __________________________________________ CALIFORNIA: Medical Marijuana ID Card Protections Clarified State ID cards may guarantee patients protection from arrest, but according to a state appeals court, they don’t protect against searches. Law enforcement officers can confirm that patients who have state ID cards are within state or county amount guidelines. Pot card can't stop searches, court says by Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle California's medical marijuana law doesn't protect card-carrying patients from being stopped and searched by police who detect the presence of the drug, a state appeals court ruled Thursday. Court: Medical Marijuana Law Doesn't Bar Search by Bay City News, KPIX CBS 5 (San Francisco) California's medical marijuana law doesn't protect a person who claims to be a patient from a reasonable search of his or her car, a state appeals court in San Francisco ruled today. __________________________________________ DISPENSARIES: Support from Officials with Experience The importance of medical marijuana dispensaries to the most seriously ill Californians is obvious to their family and friends. When those family or friends are also local officials, there is no need to explain that dispensaries are a compassionate, community-based solution for providing access. In communities with moratoria in place, ASA is working to educate officials on the benefits of sound regulations for dispensaries. Politics of Caring by Zachary Stahl, Monterey County Herald When City Council-member Jyl Lutes’ then-husband lost his appetite during a battle with bone cancer more than 20 years ago, Stanford doctors gave him an experimental prescription: a vial of tightly-rolled joints. The marijuana cigarettes, she recalls, had a stamp from the Department of Agriculture on them and the directions read, “smoke at the first sign of nausea.” Lutes says the pot helped ease the pain of his last days—he died at the age of 30. Fontana staff: Ban pot dispensaries, for now by Michael Mello, Press-Enterprise (CA) Saying there's a local need, medical-marijuana advocates recently approached Fontana's Department of Community Development with questions about what city codes said concerning the operation of dispensaries. DHS extends medical marijuana moratorium by Bill Byron, Desert Sun Medical marijuana will have to wait at least another year in Desert Hot Springs.
Location: 
United States

Press Release: White House Pushes Controversial Student Drug Testing Agenda in Honolulu on 3/27

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, March 22, 2007 Contact: Pamela Lichty, 808-224-3056 or Kit Grant, 808-552-5904 White House Pushes Controversial Student Drug Testing Agenda at Summit in Honolulu on March 27 Concerned Citizens to provide Educators with Missing Information; Parents, and Experts and Others Available for Interview Honolulu, HI — The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) is conducting a series of regional summits designed to convince local educators to implement across-the-board random, suspicionless student drug testing. This policy is unsupported by the available science and opposed by leading experts in adolescent health. The third summit of 2007 takes place on Tuesday, March 27th in Honolulu at the Sheraton Waikiki, 2255 Kalakaua Avenue at 8:30 a.m. Although the ONDCP has toured the country for the last three years promoting student drug testing, the largest study on the effectiveness of such testing, conducted by respected federally-funded researchers in 2003, found no difference in drug use among 94,000 students who were tested and those who were not. Selected regional educators and drug testing industry representatives have been invited to attend the Honolulu summit, where the ONDCP will continue to describe student drug testing as a "silver bullet" to prevent adolescent drug use. A group of concerned citizens will also attend to provide educators with important information missing from the summit, such as the objection of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Association of Addiction Professionals and the National Association of Social Workers to testing. These professionals believe random testing breaks down relationships of trust between students and adults and contribute to a hostile school environment. “We need to spend our resources educating young people, not putting them under expensive surveillance programs that have not been proven safe or effective,” said Pamela Lichty, President of the Drug Policy Forum of Hawai’i and Board Member of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Drug testing breaks down relationships of trust. All credible research on substance abuse prevention points to eliminating, rather than creating, sources of alienation and conflict between young people, their parents and schools.” The Hawaiian State Legislature has already considered, and rejected, the policy. In February 2003 the Hawai’i State Legislature voted down a bill that would have allowed schools to randomly drug test students enrolled in athletics or “physically strenuous” extracurricular activities. Currently no public schools in Hawaii have a random drug testing policy. “With the absence of evidence supporting random drug testing in schools, and given that there are substance abuse prevention programs that are non-intrusive, respect students' dignity and privacy and have been proven to work, why would a school embark on such a controversial program?” said Dr. Katherine Irwin, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. “As a concerned parent I want my children to refuse drugs for better reasons than fear of a random test. We want them to develop deeper, internal reasons to resist drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, ones that will stay with them during summers when school is out of session, and when they graduate and go on to college.” said E.J. Heroldt, a parent of children at Mid-Pacific Institute, a private school that implemented a voluntary drug testing program. Making Sense of Student Drug Testing: Why Educators Are Saying No (2006), a 25-page booklet published by the Drug Policy Alliance and the ACLU, provides the latest scientific research on student drug testing. The booklet covers the legal implications associated with student drug testing, analyzes the costs of implementing such policies, and provides resources for educators who are interested in addressing drug abuse among young people. Making Sense of Student Drug Testing: Why Educators are Saying No can be found online at http://www.drugtestingfails.org. Excerpts from the booklet are included below: Comprehensive, rigorous and respected research shows there are many reasons why random student drug testing is not good policy: · Drug testing is not effective in deterring drug use among young people; · Drug testing is expensive, taking away scarce dollars from other, more effective programs that keep young people out of trouble with drugs; · Drug testing can be legally risky, exposing schools to potentially costly litigation; · Drug testing may drive students away from extracurricular activities, which are a proven means of helping students stay out of trouble with drugs; · Drug testing can undermine trust between students and teachers, and between parents and children; · Drug testing can result in false positives, leading to the punishment of innocent students; · Drug testing does not effectively identify students who have serious problems with drugs; and · Drug testing may lead to unintended consequences, such as students using drugs (like alcohol) that are more dangerous but less detectable by a drug test. Educators should implement alternatives to drug testing that emphasize education, discussion, counseling and extracurricular activities, and that build trust between students and adults. The first and second regional summit of 2007 were held in Charleston, South Carolina (January 24) and Newark, New Jersey (February, 27). The last summit will be held later this year in Las Vegas, NV (April 24).
Location: 
HI
United States

The Sentencing Project: Disenfranchisement News & Updates -- March 22, 2007

Maryland: Voting Rights Legislation Cross Filed in House, Senate SB 448 and HB 554 are presently in committee as numerous advocates for felony disenfranchisement reform in Maryland gave testimony to House and Senate members earlier this month, according to the Baltimore Times. Kimberly Haven, Executive Director of Justice Maryland, who also gave testimony said: “This legislation will clarify the efforts of the 2002 legislation, by removing the three-year disenfranchisement period that currently exists. This three-year wait period serves no practical purpose.” Contact Information: Email: zjennings@sentencingproject.org web: http://www.sentencingproject.org
Location: 
MD
United States

CT Press Conference: Montel Williams Joins Patients and Legislators in Support of Medical Marijuana

MEDIA ADVISORY: March 22, 2007 Contact: Lorenzo Jones 860-270-9586 or Gabriel Sayegh 646-335-2264 Special Guest Montel Williams Joins Legislators, Patients, Caregivers and Advocates to Support Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act Press Conference Scheduled for Friday, 23 March 2007, 11:00 a.m. Momentum Builds as Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Legislation, HB 6715, Passes Judiciary Committee Hartford—Connecticut’s Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana legislation, House Bill 6715, cleared its first hurdle yesterday when it passed the Joint Committee on Judiciary. The bill would allow seriously ill patients access to medical marijuana with a doctor’s recommendation. A 2004 UCONN poll found that 83% of Connecticut residents support allowing patients to access medical marijuana for relief of symptoms associated with debilitating and deadly conditions such as HIV/AIDS, cancer and multiple sclerosis. Special guest Montel Williams, Emmy Award-winning talk show host and New York Times bestselling author, will join supporters to discuss his use of medical marijuana to relieve multiple sclerosis symptoms and his support of the Connecticut legislation. Also speaking will be families of Connecticut medical marijuana patients whose suffering and symptoms were relieved by medical marijuana and the sponsors of the Connecticut Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act. The Senate Health, Senior Services and Human Services Committee will hold informational hearings on Senate Bill No. 88, The Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act, on Thursday, 8 June at 1p.m. What: A press conference to release poll results on New Jersey voters’ attitudes about medical marijuana Who: -Montel Williams, Emmy Award-winning talk show host and New York Times bestselling author -Rep. Penny Bacchiochi: 52nd District: Sommers, Stratford, Union -Rep. Mike Christ: 11th District: East Hartford and South Windsor -Deputy Speaker of the House Representatives Marie Kirkley-Bey: 5th District: Hartford -Mark Braunstein, patient, paraplegic with a spinal cord injury -Andrea Comer, Hartford resident and former president of African American Alliance -Tim Black, Ph.D., caregiver and Hartford Resident -Dawn Marie Fuller Ball, caregiver and A Better Way Foundation Board President -other Connecticut State Legislators, advocates, and patients When: Friday, March 23, 2007, 11:00 a.m. Where: Connecticut Legislative Office Building, Room 2D
Location: 
Hartford, CT
United States

Press Release: Public Safety Emergency in Mendocino (CA)

Release Date: March 20, 2007 Contact: Steve Kubby (707) 964-7743 (Media only, please) UKIAH, CA -- Calling the new Mendocino Marijuana Policy a "Declaration of war against sick, disabled and dying Mendocino citizens," a local group of private citizens, headed up by Steve Kubby, took the Board of Supervisors to task for violating the specific instructions from the voters regarding marijuana policy. In a letter provided with this press release, Mr. Kubby explained to the Board, why their actions were such a threat to patients and why Measure G has already decided the issue. The group of concerned citizens is asking the Board to declare a Public Safety Emergency and has given the Supervisors 15 days to correct their illegal activities. ### March 20, 2007 Board of Supervisors Office 501 Low Gap Road, Room 1090 Ukiah, CA 95482 Dear Supervisors, On Nov. 8, 2000, Mendocino County voters approved Measure G, calling for the decriminalization of personal use and small scale cultivation of marijuana. Measure G is now a legally binding, county ordinance, which clearly sets out a specified set of directives to be followed by the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, spelling out for the Board how they are required to act and not act in relation to the small scale cultivation and use of cannabis in Mendocino County. Measure G passed by a margin of 58-42%. Seven years later, we find that the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors has thus far neglected or declined to comply with your constituents' specific instructions as embodied in the Measure G ordinance, to wit: * Section 4 of Measure G instructs the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors to "lobby state and federal governments for the immediate decriminalization of the personal use of Cannabis, specifically by repealing Sections 11357, (possession), 11358, (transportation), and 11359, (cultivation), of the California Health and Safety Code." We are not aware of any communications from the Board addressed to the state Legislature or any member thereof, or to the Governor, or to the US Congress, or to any State or Federal regulatory agency, pursuant to this clear and unambiguous instruction enacted into law by your constituents. If any such communications exist, we ask that you publicly divulge the content forthwith. If no such communications exist, we request an explanation on your part as to why you have failed to act as lawfully required. * Section 5 of Measure G instructs the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors to "use its budgetary authority to ensure that the Sheriff's Office makes no arrests and issues no citations for violations of the above state Health and Safety Code sections in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plant or the equivalent in dried marijuana." Additionally, Section 6 of Measure G clearly states that "[n] either the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, nor the Sheriff, nor the District Attorney shall spend or authorize the expenditure of any public funds for the investigation, arrest, or prosecution of any person, or the seizure of any property in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana, nor shall the Auditor Controller or the Treasurer- Tax Collector approve any such requests for such expenditures of public funds, or authorize or approve the issuance of any form of payment should such expenditures be made." We are aware that a number of such arrests and prosecutions have taken place in the period intervening between the passage of Measure G and your receipt of this letter. Further, we are aware that the source of payroll and operations funding for the officer(s) making such arrests may be Federal and State, rather than county government. We regard this tactic as an attempt on the part of the Board to subvert its responsibilities to the voters of Mendocino County. The Board's budgetary authority, broadly construed, extends not only to making and disposing of local appropriations, but to the acceptance or refusal of Federal gifts, grants, and other monies such as those used to fund the law enforcement activities in question, and to the decision to fund, or not fund, the employment of any given individual by the Sheriff's Office, any type of litigation by the Prosecutor's office, or any type of disbursement by the Auditor Controller or the Treasurer-Tax Collector. We believe the arrests and prosecutions in question have been made with the acquiescence of, if not the knowledge and cooperation of, the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, constituting an illegal abuse of the Board's budgetary authority. It is also our belief that the Board has no authority to override a voter initiative, nor can the Board restrict the legally allowed activities of Mendocino County citizens, which are described in Measure G, insofar as Measure G provisions are consistent with California state law. Furthermore, we believe there has been an increase from 15 marijuana cases under review a year ago, to 120 cases under active prosecution today, an unfortunate result of Sheriff Tony Craver retiring and District Attorney Norm Vroman dying. For those unfortunate citizens caught up in the temporary leadership vacuum that resulted, their suffering is certainly real and demands your attention, especially now, when the Board is contemplating illegally modifying a voter initiative by slashing the county limits to the absolute minimum allowed by state law. * Section 8 of Measure G requires the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors to "instruct the Sheriff's Office and District Attorney to report on December 1st of each year regarding marijuana law enforcement and prosecution activities engaged in by themselves and by state, federal, and/or other law enforcement agencies within the County of Mendocino." We are unaware of any such reports or of any action by the Board to so instruct the offices in question. When Mendocino County's government officials so blatantly and consistently violate the instructions of their constituents, as lawfully and unambiguously expressed in Measure G, such actions create a PUBLIC SAFETY EMERGENCY that requires immediate and serious action. Specifically, we are asking the Board to demonstrate its commitment to follow Measure G by immediately passing a resolution that sets the county guidelines for medical patients at "25 plants, or its equivalent in dried marijuana," as specified in Measure G, and that the Board will begin immediately with compliance to the requirements set forth in the ordinance. Please understand that lives and property are on the line here and this Public Safety Emergency creates real hardships and suffering for your constituents. When Mendocino Sheriff's deputies destroy the medicine of bona fide, card-carrying patients, it is sick, disabled and dying patients who suffer the hardships on their health and finances, even if their case is dismissed and their property is eventually returned. Your constituents get no warning when they are raided, nor any chance to address the issues before being dragged off, booked, charged, assets seized, bank account frozen and publicly humiliated. Bona fide patients must still live in fear in Mendocino and will continue to do so until this Board sets the county guidelines - in accordance with Measure G. We ask that the Board immediately declare a Public Safety Emergency and act promptly to uphold Measure G as the guideline -- within the next fifteen (15) days. Please heed our call and act promptly and sincerely to resolve these issues. Thank you in advance for your cooperation and support. Let freedom grow, Steve Kubby Jim Hill Trelanie Hill Kristen Peskuski Tom Davenport Dane Wilkins Paula Dieter Bob Dieter ================== MEASURE G: MARIJUANA ORDINANCE FOR MENDOCINO COUNTY Section 1: FINDINGS. The people of Mendocino County find as follows: * WHEREAS Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is a beneficial plant with a respectable heritage and hundreds of well-known industrial, medicinal and recreational uses; * WHEREAS two decades of marijuana law enforcement in Mendocino County has not stopped cultivation here but has unnecessarily marginalized a large number of otherwise law abiding citizens who grow and use marijuana; * WHEREAS those who grow for personal use are not responsible for violent incidents sometimes associated with marijuana cultivation, but are vulnerable to theft; * WHEREAS The Institute of Medicine has found that marijuana has bona fide medical uses and is not a gateway to hard drug addiction; * WHEREAS law enforcement has carried out investigations, confiscations, and arrests against persons cultivating and using medical marijuana under Proposition 215 in Mendocino County; * WHEREAS the cities of Berkeley and San Francisco have longstanding ordinances which instruct police to minimize the priority of marijuana enforcement. Section 2: PURPOSE The ordinance codified in this chapter will: A. Instruct the county government to support all efforts toward the decriminalization of marijuana; B. Instruct the county sheriff and district attorney to make marijuana enforcement their lowest priority with respect to other crimes; C. Establish a maximum limit of plants and weight for cultivation and possession of marijuana for personal use in Mendocino County, and prohibit the expenditure of public funds for enforcement of marijuana laws against cultivators and users in possession of quantities below that limit. D. Remove the fear of prosecution and the stigma of criminality from people who harmlessly cultivate and/or use marijuana for personal medical or recreational purposes. E. Extend police protection to those growing or possessing marijuana for personal use; F. Provide for the continued enforcement of marijuana laws against those who cultivate, transport and possess marijuana for sale. THEREFORE: the purpose of this chapter is to establish Cannabis enforcement policy for Mendocino County. Section 3: DECRIMINALIZATION OF CANNABIS IN CALIFORNIA It is the desire of the people of Mendocino County that the cultivation for personal use of Cannabis be decriminalized in California. In this context, the board of supervisors is directed to lobby state and federal governments for the immediate decriminalization of the personal use of Cannabis, specifically by repealing Sections 11357, (possession), 11358, (transportation), and 11359, (cultivation), of the California Health and Safety Code. The people also urge the Sheriff and District Attorney to publicly support such decriminalization. Section 4: LAW ENFORCEMENT PRIORITY OF CANNABIS Through its budgetary authority, the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors shall seek to ensure that the Sheriff's Office and the District Attorney give lowest priority to the enforcement and prosecution of marijuana laws. Section 5: SHERIFF OFFICE ARRESTS AND CITATIONS The Board of Supervisors shall use its budgetary authority to ensure that the Sheriff's Office makes no arrests and issues no citations for violations of the above state Health and Safety Code sections in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana. Section 6: DISTRICT ATTORNEY PROSECUTIONS The Board of Supervisors shall use its funding authority to ensure that the District Attorney shall not prosecute any violations of the above state Health and Safety Code sections nor seize any property in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana. Section 7: EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS FOR CANNABIS ENFORCEMENT Neither the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, nor the Sheriff, nor the District Attorney shall spend or authorize the expenditure of any public funds for the investigation, arrest, or prosecution of any person, or the seizure of any property in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana, nor shall the Auditor Controller or the Treasurer- Tax Collector approve any such requests for such expenditures of public funds, or authorize or approve the issuance of any form of payment should such expenditures be made. Section 8: REPORTING The Board of Supervisors shall instruct the Sheriff's Office and District Attorney to report on December 1 of each year regarding marijuana law enforcement and prosecution activities engaged in by themselves and by state, federal, and/or other law enforcement agencies within the County of Mendocino. Section 9: SERVERABILITY The people of Mendocino County intend that in case a court of competent jurisdiction should find one or more of the above Sections illegal, the remaining Sections remain in full force and effect.
Location: 
Ukiah, CA
United States

Vote Hemp Press Release: Poll Shows Strong Voter Support for Industrial Hemp Farming in California

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, March 19, 2007 CONTACT: Adam Eidinger Ph: 202-744-2671, adam@votehemp.com or Tom Murphy Ph: 207-542-4998, tom@votehemp.com Poll Shows Strong Voter Support for Industrial Hemp Farming in California 71% of Californians Support Changing State Law to Allow Hemp Farming; Hearings on New Hemp Bill AB 684 Scheduled for March 27 SACRAMENTO, CA – Vote Hemp, the nation’s leading grassroots organization working to give farmers the right to grow non-psychoactive industrial hemp to be made into everything from food, clothing, paper, body care, bio-fuel and even auto parts has released a new poll of 801 likely California voters about industrial hemp. The telephone poll has a 3.5% margin of error and sampled likely California voters from February 22 – 26. The survey was conducted by the respected research firm Zogby International on behalf of Vote Hemp and five manufacturers of hemp food products including Alpsnack™, French Meadow Bakery™, Living Harvest™, Nature’s Path Organic Foods™ and Nutiva™. The poll results released today for the first time confirm there is strong support for reform on the issue of industrial hemp. A total of 71% support changing state law to allow farmers to grow hemp and of those surveyed 46% strongly support and another 25% somewhat support changing state law so California farmers can supply manufacturers with hemp seed, oil and fiber. Presently companies must import hemp from other countries. Over the past several years the California Legislature has passed resolutions and bills to permit farmers to grow industrial hemp. AB 684, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act is authored by Assemblyman Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) and Assemblyman Chuck DeVore (R-Irvine) and will be heard in the Assembly Public Safety Committee on Tuesday, March 27, 2007. If passed and signed into law, AB 684 would regulate commercial industrial hemp farming in California. Today more than 30 industrialized nations grow industrial hemp and export to the US. It is the only crop that is both illegal to grow and legal for Americans to import. Sales of hemp food and body care products have grown rapidly in recent years fueling an expansion of hemp farming in Canada which topped 48,000 acres in 2006. Poll questions and results regarding industrial hemp farming policy and consumer attitudes on hemp products and nutrition can be viewed online at http://www.votehemp.com/polls.html. There is evidence of strong support among men and women and self-identified liberal and conservative voters on the issue. Among California Republicans, 60% support changing state law on hemp while 74% of Democrats are in support. Support was also steady among all age groups, ranging from 54% of 18 to 29 year olds to 82% of 30 to 49 year olds, 74% of 50 to 64 years olds and 60% of those over 65 years old. Assemblyman Mark Leno who introduced AB 684 in February said, “The Zogby poll underscores that California voters of all political persuasions support changing the senseless policy of importing industrial hemp while prohibiting our own farmers from growing it.” # # # More information about hemp legislation and the crop’s many uses can be found at www.VoteHemp.com
Location: 
Sacramento, CA
United States

Medical marijuana hearing Monday in state House

Location: 
Olympia, WA
United States
Publication/Source: 
KLXY (WA)
URL: 
http://www.kxly.com/news/?sect_rank=4&section_id=603&story_id=9621

Warrantless drug search unconstitutional, Supreme Court says

Location: 
WY
United States
Publication/Source: 
Casper Star Tribune
URL: 
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articles/2007/03/26/news/wyoming/082ecf511acdaddd872572a90026929c.txt

CT: Medical marijuana bill gains support

Location: 
Hartford, CT
United States
Publication/Source: 
The News-Times (CT)
URL: 
http://www.newstimeslive.com/news/story.php?id=1035231

Drug Policy Forum of Kansas Update

Wakarusa Music Festival: Volunteers Needed KS Legislature: Meth Offender Registry Update ACLU Forum on Wakarusa Law Enforcement Past Issues Medical Marijuana: Two Federal Court Rulings Medical Marijuana: New Mexico Passes Legislation Next Volunteer Meeting March 24, 1 p.m. The Drug Policy Forum of Kansas is a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax-deductible. Volunteers Needed for Wakarusa Music Festival DPFKS members interested in volunteering to work a few hours a day at the Wakarusa Music Festival, should send us an email (info@dpfks.org). The festival takes place June 7-10 at Clinton State Park outside of Lawrence. KS House Holds Hearing on SB 14: Meth Offender Registry SB 14 would create a registry on the KBI web site for people who have been released from prison for manufacturing methamphetamine. The registration would require a $20 fee every six months for life. Testifying in opposition to SB 14 were DPFKS along with KS Families Against Mandatory Minimums, a representative from the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the parents of a currently incarcerated meth offender. Read the testimony on our website and why this bill is a waste of taxpayer money that will not reduce drug use or illegal drug availability. Wakarusa '07 - Privacy Rights in Public Places; ACLU forum April 25 at 7pm at the Lawrence Library the Douglas County ACLU will present a panel discussion with Brett Shirk, Executive Director of the KS/WMO ACLU, Rick Frydman, attorney and Charles Branson, Douglas County DA, There will be a panel discussion and questions from the audience. Judge in Ed Rosenthal Throws Out Charges Due to Vindictive Prosecution Federal District Court Judge Charles Breyer ruled this week that author and medical marijuana activist Edward Rosenthal was vindictively prosecuted, and dismissed charges of tax evasion and money laundering. The remaining marijuana charges against Rosenthal are virtually identical to those pursued against him in his prior 2003 trial. With an admission in court by the U.S. Attorney that it would not seek additional punishment beyond the one-day sentence Rosenthal was given after being convicted at his first trial, the prosecution has little reason to proceed with the case. 9th Circuit Court Rules Against California Legal Medical Marijuana Patient The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals rejected and appeal by Angel Raich (the California woman who was arrested by the DEA for using a small amount of marijuana recommended by her physician and legal under California law), ruling that there is no fundamental constitutional right to use marijuana for relief of pain and suffering. In a 3-0 ruling, Judge Harry Pregerson wrote, "We agree with Raich that medical and conventional wisdom that recognizes the use of marijuana for medical purposes is gaining traction in the law as well. But that legal recognition has not yet reached the point where a conclusion can be drawn that the right to use medical marijuana is "fundamental" and "implicit in the concept of ordered liberty." The court also rejected Raich's contention that the 10th Amendment protected her right to use medical marijuana. New Mexico Poised to Become 12th State to Fully Protect Medical Marijuana Patients From DRCNet: First it passed the Senate and died in the House. Then, at the urging of Gov. Bill Richardson, New Mexico's Senate folded medical marijuana into a related bill to permit topical use. This week the bill passed the House 36-31. It must return to the Senate for consideration of a minor change that occured in the House, but given strong support there and the assurance of the Governor's signature, I believe it's safe to say we're looking at our 12th medical marijuana state. Richardson's willingness to stand up for patients at this time speaks volumes to the growing political viability of medical marijuana policy reform. The Boston Globe looks at the political implications of Richardson's stance on medical marijuana and concludes that it's not a big deal. Next Volunteer Meeting Saturday, March 24, 1 p.m. at the DPFKS offices -- 941 Kentucky Street, Lawrence, KS 785-841-8278 for more information.
Location: 
KS
United States

Drug War Issues

Criminal JusticeAsset Forfeiture, Collateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Court Rulings, Drug Courts, Due Process, Felony Disenfranchisement, Incarceration, Policing (2011 Drug War Killings, 2012 Drug War Killings, 2013 Drug War Killings, 2014 Drug War Killings, Arrests, Eradication, Informants, Interdiction, Lowest Priority Policies, Police Corruption, Police Raids, Profiling, Search and Seizure, SWAT/Paramilitarization, Task Forces, Undercover Work), Probation or Parole, Prosecution, Reentry/Rehabilitation, Sentencing (Alternatives to Incarceration, Clemency and Pardon, Crack/Powder Cocaine Disparity, Death Penalty, Decriminalization, Defelonization, Drug Free Zones, Mandatory Minimums, Rockefeller Drug Laws, Sentencing Guidelines)CultureArt, Celebrities, Counter-Culture, Music, Poetry/Literature, Television, TheaterDrug UseParaphernalia, ViolenceIntersecting IssuesCollateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Violence, Border, Budgets/Taxes/Economics, Business, Civil Rights, Driving, Economics, Education (College Aid), Employment, Environment, Families, Free Speech, Gun Policy, Human Rights, Immigration, Militarization, Money Laundering, Pregnancy, Privacy (Search and Seizure, Drug Testing), Race, Religion, Science, Sports, Women's IssuesMarijuana PolicyGateway Theory, Hemp, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Marijuana Industry, Medical MarijuanaMedicineMedical Marijuana, Science of Drugs, Under-treatment of PainPublic HealthAddiction, Addiction Treatment (Science of Drugs), Drug Education, Drug Prevention, Drug-Related AIDS/HIV or Hepatitis C, Harm Reduction (Methadone & Other Opiate Maintenance, Needle Exchange, Overdose Prevention, Safe Injection Sites)Source and Transit CountriesAndean Drug War, Coca, Hashish, Mexican Drug War, Opium ProductionSpecific DrugsAlcohol, Ayahuasca, Cocaine (Crack Cocaine), Ecstasy, Heroin, Ibogaine, ketamine, Khat, Marijuana (Gateway Theory, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Medical Marijuana, Hashish), Methamphetamine, New Synthetic Drugs (Synthetic Cannabinoids, Synthetic Stimulants), Nicotine, Prescription Opiates (Fentanyl, Oxycontin), Psychedelics (LSD, Mescaline, Peyote, Salvia Divinorum)YouthGrade School, Post-Secondary School, Raves, Secondary School