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Don't let Congress get away with it

 

Tell Congress to Stand Up for Students


Tell your representative and senators that you are tired of the same old "Drug War" politics.
http://www.ssdp.org/speakup/

 

Dear friends,

Congress failed us.

Despite a decade-long campaign by Students for Sensible Drug Policy, supporters like you, and a large and powerful coalition of more than 500 prominent organizations, Congress finally reauthorized the Higher Education Act (HEA) last week but chose to ignore our demands that they overturn the provision that strips financial aid from college students with drug convictions.

How come?

Outrageously, staffers on Capitol Hill are telling us that some members of Congress were terrified of facing negative attack ads calling them "pro-drug" if they voted for a bill reinstating aid to students with drug convictions.

Even as Congress was debating the HEA bill last week, Rep. Mark Souder (R-IN), the author and chief proponent of the aid penalty claimed on the House floor that his precious provision "has been much aligned [sic] by ***pro-drug groups*** around the country."

So you can see that one of the major roadblocks to reform is the false conventional wisdom that voters will punish politicians who do the right thing by repealing harmful and ineffective drug laws. 

It's up to reformers like you and me to smash this false conventional wisdom by standing up and showing politicians that they will actually win votes for doing the right thing (and that, conversely, we may punish them at the polls for letting their unfounded fears stand in the way of progress).  After all, it is this anti-education penalty itself that causes more drug abuse, right?

So no matter how many times you have taken action on this issue in the past, please take just one minute to edit and send a pre-written letter to your representative and two senators demanding that Congress stop letting senseless political fears keep deserving and hardworking students out of school.

Click here right now to take action. http://www.ssdp.org/speakup/

And please make sure you forward us any responses you get from your legislators so we can track who is standing in the way of change.  Send those important responses to letters@ssdp.org when you get them.

Despite this setback, SSDP and our coalition allies are as determined as ever to see this senseless penalty repealed.  We are already planning our strategy for the next Congress and presidential administration, and remain optimistic that despite the barriers we have yet to overcome, we will ultimately restore financial aid to the more than 200,000 students impacted by this penalty.  In the meantime, members of Congress need to continue to hear an unwavering message from constituents that the public will not stand idly by as our elected officials continue to deny access to education in the name of the so-called "War on Drugs."

If we don't speak up and demand change when legislators need to hear it most, who will?  Please take action today. http://www.ssdp.org/speakup/

Thanks for all that you do,
Tom Angell
SSDP Government Relations Director

P.S. If you'd like to see SSDP continue to work on this and other issues, let us know by making a donation today. http://www.ssdp.org/donate

P.P.S. If you are a student wishing to get involved in fighting back against Drug War attacks on youth, contact us about starting an SSDP chapter: http://www.ssdp.org/chapters/start

Congress to skip vote on medical marijuana this year

[Courtesy of Marijuana Policy Project] 

Dear friends:

Congress has recessed for the summer without voting on the medical marijuana amendment that Congressmen Maurice Hinchey (D-N.Y.) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) offer every summer. Unfortunately, this means the amendment will not come up for a vote this year — the first year since 2002.

If passed, the amendment would have prevented the Justice Department — which includes the DEA — from interfering with the medical marijuana laws on the books in 12 states.

Congress decided that rather than considering the Justice Department's annual spending bill, which contains thousands of funding requests and issue-oriented amendments, Congress will instead simply vote to allow this year's funding levels to carry over until next year.   

However, there are two other pieces of legislation in Congress that your U.S. House member needs to hear from you about:

1. The Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act of 2008 (H.R. 5842) would give states greater authority to determine their own medical marijuana policies.

2. The Personal Use of Marijuana By Responsible Adults Act of 2008 (H.R. 5843) would remove federal penalties for possessing up to 3.5 ounces of marijuana.

Would you please take one minute to visit MPP's online action center and ask your U.S. House member to co-sponsor these two bills?

Meanwhile, we're also gearing up for the changed — and more favorable — political climate that we can expect from a new presidential administration and Congress next year. You'll be hearing more from us about our plans for 2009 in the coming months.

As always, thank you for your support.

Sincerely,
Kampia signature (e-mail sized)

Rob Kampia
Executive Director
Marijuana Policy Project
Washington, D.C.

P.S. As I've mentioned in previous alerts, a major philanthropist has committed to match the first $3.0 million that MPP can raise from the rest of the planet in 2008. This means that your donation today will be doubled.

Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

A Life and Death Issue

You Can Make a Difference

Dear friends,

Several months ago my colleague Naomi Long and I had an op-ed in The Washington Post calling for a repeal of the federal prohibition that blocks states from using their share of HIV/AIDS prevention money on syringe exchange programs. We had a hard-hitting conclusion: “As many as 300,000 Americans could contract HIV/AIDS or hepatitis C over the next decade because of a lack of access to sterile syringes. This essentially makes the national syringe ban a death sentence for drug users, their partners and children.”

Take action now to support a bill in Congress that would repeal the ban.

Last year my colleague Jasmine Tyler lost her father to HIV/AIDS that he contracted from injection drug use and it really hit our D.C. office hard. She had this to share: “From the time he found out he was HIV-positive until the day he died in April of 2007, he suffered greatly and so did our family.  Every day I know that the hell he lived through could have been avoided if only he had had access to sterile needles all the time.  It’s too late to bring him back, but every other life that can be saved should be.”

While our country spends billions of dollars on efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C and other infectious diseases, the U.S. prohibits the use of prevention funds to support syringe exchange programs. This robs cities, states and private organizations of the right to do what’s best for the people, and costs taxpayers a lot of money. It’s far cheaper to distribute syringes and prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis than it is to treat people who contract those infectious diseases after it's too late.

Last year, District of Columbia Congressional Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton and New York Congressman Jose Serrano successfully repealed a federal ban that prohibited D.C. from spending its own budget money on syringe exchange programs. This week Rep. Serrano introduced a bill that would repeal the national syringe funding ban. If enacted, it could save hundreds of thousands of lives and millions in taxpayer dollars. Please urge your representative to support this urgent, life-saving bill.

Take action now.

Want to do more? Set up a meeting with your representative when he or she is in your district during Congress's August recess. Learn how.

Sincerely,

Bill Piper
Director of National Affairs
Drug Policy Alliance

More Information

--According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), of the 415,193 people reported to be living with AIDS in the United States at the end of 2004, about 30 percent of cases are related to injection drug use, either directly (sharing contaminated syringes) or indirectly (having sex with someone who used a contaminated syringe or being born to a mother who used a contaminated syringe).

--Each year, approximately 12,000 Americans contract HIV/AIDS directly or indirectly from the sharing of dirty syringes. About 17,000 people contract hepatitis C.
 
--The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Medical Association, National Academy of Sciences, American Public Health Association, and numerous other scientific bodies have found that syringe exchange programs are highly effective at preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases. Moreover, seven federal reports have found that increasing access to sterile syringes saves lives without increasing drug use.

--Increasing the availability of sterile syringes through exchange programs, pharmacies and other outlets reduces unsafe injection practices such as syringe sharing, curtails transmission of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis, increases safe disposal of used syringes, and helps injection drug users obtain drug education and treatment.

--The lifetime cost of treating just one person who contracts HIV/AIDS can be as high as $600,000. This cost is often borne by taxpayers. In contrast, syringe exchange programs can prevent thousands of new HIV/AIDS cases at very little cost. Funding syringe exchange programs saves both lives and taxpayer money.

--A federal appropriations rider in the annual Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies spending bill prohibits states from spending their share of federal prevention money on syringe exchange programs. H.R. 6680 would repeal that provision.

Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

Marijuana decriminalization bill gaining support in Congress

[Courtesy of Marijuana Policy Project] 

Dear friends:

Here's a photo of MPP's Rob Kampia and Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.) at a news conference yesterday, where we announced the growing support for his bill to decriminalize marijuana possession on the federal level.

Barney Frank and Rob Kampia 7/30/2008

The event was covered by CNN, The Politico, The San Francisco Chronicle, Roll Call, Reason, Denver Daily News, and many other news outlets. You can see some of the coverage here, and you can see our video of the event here.

We haven't even made a push for co-sponsors yet, but members of Congress keep coming forward to attach their names to the bill:

Tammy Baldwin (D-Wisc.)
Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.)
William Lacy Clay (D-Mo.)
Barbara Lee (D-Calif.)
Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.)
Jim McDermott (D-Wash.)
Ron Paul (R-Texas)

Imagine what would happen if everyone reading this e-mail alert were to send a letter to his or her U.S. House member asking him or her to co-sponsor the bill too. You can send that letter in about 60 seconds right here.

The “Personal Use of Marijuana By Responsible Adults Act” would eliminate all federal penalties for possession of less than 100 grams of marijuana and the not-for-profit transfer of 1 ounce or less.

Please visit MPP's online action center today and ask your U.S. House member to co-sponsor this legislation.  

Thank you,
Aaron signature
Aaron Houston
Director of Government Relations
Marijuana Policy Project
Washington, D.C.

P.S. If you'd like to read Rob Kampia's written remarks presented at the press conference, you can read them here.

Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

Feature: Federal Marijuana Decriminalization Bill Has Its Coming Out Party

For the first time in decades, a marijuana decriminalization bill is before the Congress. Actually introduced by Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA) in April, the Act to Remove Federal Penalties for the Personal Use of Marijuana by Responsible Adults (H.R. 5843) got its coming out party Wednesday as Frank, a handful of other representatives, and leaders of prominent drug reform organizations held a Capitol Hill press conference to push for the bill.

In the eyes of many, the bill couldn't come soon enough. Since 1965, more than 20 million Americans have been arrested on marijuana charges, 830,000 in 2006. Of those, nearly 90% were for simple possession. In addition to the jail time and other costs imposed on offenders, marijuana law enforcement costs society more than $7 billion a year.

While passage of a federal decriminalization bill would have little direct impact -- only 160 people were charged with federal marijuana possession offenses last year -- its symbolic impact could help break the marijuana law reform log-jam that has endured since the days of the hippies.

Here is the text of the bill in its entirety:

"Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no penalty may be imposed under an Act of Congress for the possession of marijuana for personal use, or for the not-for-profit transfer between adults of marijuana for personal use. For the purposes of this section, possession of 100 grams or less of marijuana shall be presumed to be for personal use, as shall the not-for-profit transfer of one ounce or less of marijuana, except that the civil penalty provided in section 405 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 844a) may be imposed for the public use of marijuana if the amount of the penalty does not exceed $100."

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/files/frankpressconf.jpg
Reps. Lee, Frank and Clay at press conference (courtesy Drug Policy Alliance)
Frank and other advocates conceded the bill has no chance of passage this year, but lauded it as a long overdue beginning. Hearings could come next year, they said.

The federal government should stop arresting marijuana users, Frank said as he stood before the microphones flanked by Congressional Black Caucus members Reps. Lacy Clay (D-MO) and Barbara Lee (D-CA), and advocates Allen St. Pierre, executive director of NORML; Rob Kampia, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, and Bill Piper, national affairs director of the Drug Policy Alliance.

Existing laws aimed at marijuana users punish otherwise law-abiding citizens and sick people whose doctors have recommended the drug, disproportionately impact African-Americans, and waste law enforcement resources, Frank said. They also amount to an unwarranted intrusion into the private lives of Americans, he said.

"There is absolutely nothing wrong with the responsible use of marijuana by adults and this should be of no interest or concern to the government," said NORML's St. Pierre. "In fact, the vast majority of marijuana smokers are adults who cause no harm to themselves or to anyone else, so there is no reason for the state to be involved."

Marijuana use should be treated like alcohol use, St. Pierre continued. "With alcohol we acknowledge the distinction between use and abuse, and we focus our law enforcement involvement on efforts to stop irresponsible use. We do not arrest or jail responsible alcohol drinkers. That should be our policy with marijuana as well," he said, noting that there were more than 11 million marijuana arrests since 1990.

Reps. Clay and Lee both emphasized the inordinate number of arrests of minority pot smokers. The application of the marijuana laws unfairly targets blacks, said Clay.

Clay called marijuana prohibition part of "a phony war on drugs that is filling up our prisons, especially with people of color." It is time for a "practical, common sense approach" instead, he said.

Lee also noted the disproportionate impact of marijuana law enforcement on the minority community, but as a representative of a state where medical marijuana is legal also singled out another group that suffers under the law. "This bill is about compassion," she said. "The federal government has better things to do than send sick people to jail."

MPP's Kampia noted that marijuana arrests outnumber arrests for "all violent crimes combined," and suggested that law enforcement concentrate less on pursuing nonviolent marijuana offenders. "Ending arrests is the key to marijuana policy reform," he said. "It is important to eliminate the threat of arrest. For the many marijuana users who aren't arrested, they still live in fear of arrest."

Marijuana prohibition is "one of the most destructive criminal justice policies in America today," said DPA's Piper, noting that in addition to arrest and possible imprisonment, marijuana users face the loss of jobs, financial aid for college, federal benefits, and access to low-cost public housing.

Even while conceding the bill has virtually zero chance of passing this year, earlier in the week Piper said you have to start somewhere. "The goal is to raise the issue and have something that advocates can organize around," he said. "But just having this bill introduced is groundbreaking in itself."

It could also rub off at state houses across the land, Piper said. "This will encourage state lawmakers to introduce similar bills. This is also something we can now turn around and use to lobby with at state houses," he said.

"There's a growing sentiment in Congress that the prisons are overcrowded," said MPP spokesman Dan Bernath. "I think we are at or near a tipping point, and this bill is a good way to start chipping away at our marijuana laws," he said. "This will set the stage for sensible marijuana reforms at the state and local level, as well as more meaningful federal reforms in the future."

If reformers see little likelihood of anything happening this year, the federal government's anti-drug bureaucrats were taking no chances. Crashing the gate at the press conference were Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) chief scientist Dr. David Murray and two aides. They came carrying glossy ONDCP propaganda and hoping to immediately rebut any claims by reformers, but both press corps and event participants seemed more bemused by their appearance than interested in what they had to say.

Feature: Prescription Drug "Fatal Medical Errors" Rising Dramatically -- What Does It Mean?

A study released this week charted a startling increase in deaths from "fatal medical errors," particularly those associated with people mixing street drugs and alcohol with prescription medications at home. In this context, "fatal medical error" refers to people dying from taking prescribed medications, usually opioids, but also including other drugs, such as benzodiazepines (Valium, for example).

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/oxycontin.jpg
the pain reliever Oxycontin
But while the numbers have some in the medical community calling for tighter restrictions on prescribing, they have some in the pain relief community worrying about just that possibility. And they're leaving other interested observers wondering just how accurate they are, what they mean, and just who is dying.

According to the study by University of California at San Diego sociologist David Phillips, which examined all US death certificates from the beginning of 1983 to the end of 2004, the overall death rate from fatal medical errors increased more than three-fold over that period, but the death rate from fatal medical errors when the drugs are taken at home and combined with alcohol and/or street drugs has increased a whopping 30-fold.

That means that accidental overdoses at home with alcohol or street drugs involved accounted for 17% of fatal medical error deaths in 2004. That's a seven-fold increase over the 2.3% reported in 1983.

In real numbers, the study found 22,770 fatalities from medication errors in 2004, with 3,792 of them attributed to mixing meds with alcohol or other drugs. In 1983, by contrast, only 92 people died from mixing drugs.

The increase in fatal medical errors involving prescription drugs is larger than the increase in the use of prescription drugs themselves, which has increased about 70% in the last decade.

Fatal medical errors involving prescription drugs dispensed in a hospital or doctor's office setting increased only 5%, while such errors involving home use but no street drug or alcohol use and such errors involving medical settings and alcohol and/or street drug use both increased five-fold.

Phillips and his coauthors pointed their finger at the ongoing migration of prescription drug dispensing from medical professionals at hospitals and doctors' office to patients at home. The decades-long shift in the location of medication consumption from clinical to domestic settings, they said, "is linked to a dramatic increase in fatal medication errors."

It is not just people swallowing prescription pills at home, but the involvement of other drugs in the overdoses that is disturbing, they said. "Domestic fatal medication errors, combined with alcohol and/or street drugs, have become an increasingly important health problem."

The study recommended increased screening for patient abuse of prescription drugs, alcohol, or street drugs, as well as increased vigilance toward prescribing medicines with known dangerous interactions with alcohol or street drugs.

But others in the medical profession are taking the study's findings and running with them. One medical blogger looking to restrict access to pain meds put it like this: "What is going on here is a direct result of politicizing medicine by the pain rights movement and the organizations that have mandated liberal pain management into guidelines and enforcement standards. More recently the push to promote patient satisfaction in healthcare organizations has resulted in liberalizing of prescribing opioid medications to make patients happy. Whatever happened to do no harm? Medicine has lost its way. These numbers should serve as a wake up call and re-examination of pain management practices."

And that is, unsurprisingly, raising hackles in the embattled pain relief movement. Pain relief advocates have long argued that access to effective opioid pain medications is too restricted, pointing to numerous cases of doctors prosecuted and imprisoned for their prescribing practices -- and the patients being left in the lurch.

"The pain relief movement had made only modest gains when it was faced with a government-wide crackdown, led by the Justice Department," said Siobhan Reynolds of the Pain Relief Network. "Now, those who know that they could find help in the form of opioids, find themselves shut out of care and stigmatized by the entire system. I don't think I have ever seen a more destructive phenomenon sweep this country... all in the name of a drug free America, an America which could never exist."

It's not pain patients who are dying of opioid overdoses, said California pain management physician Dr. Frank Fisher. "I've analyzed dozens of these deaths now, and the field of forensic pathology is in such disarray that any time they find an opioid post-mortem, they label the death an overdose," he said. "But pain patients almost never overdose because of the phenomenon of tolerance -- unless it's a massive deliberate overdose, and then they have to take the benzos, barbiturates, or alcohol."

"It's true that it's very hard for an opioid tolerant person to overdose -- if they know what they're doing," said Dr. Matt Das Gupta, an epidemiologist working with North Carolina's Project Lazarus, a program that distributes the opioid antagonist naloxone (Narcan) to drug users to prevent overdoses. But mixing opioids with other drugs or alcohol can fell even the hardiest opioid tolerant patient, he warned.

Most pain patients are dying of cardiac disease, said Fisher. "Heart disease kills pain patients because they're sedentary because of their conditions and they're under stress from chronic pain. What I'm seeing is an epidemic of cardiac disease brought on or exacerbated by chronic pain. Medical examiners are calling them overdoses because they have opioids in their systems, but the medical examiners are wrong when it comes to chronic pain patients."

Suicides among pain patients are no surprise, said Fisher, but they tend to be undercounted. "Unless they leave a note, the medical examiner never calls it suicide, they will call it undetermined or accidental overdose. The medical examiners are giving us terrible data," he complained.

"Medical examiners not coding properly is a perennial problem," said Das Gupta. But that could go both ways. "There are people who died who probably should be included, but were not coded as ODs. For example, one code is chronic use of opioids. If you include that, the numbers go up by 10% or 15%."

(For more on the controversies surrounding drug-related deaths, cause of death coding issues, and associated topics, check out this page at Brian C. Bennett's web site, Truth: The Anti-Drug War.)

While pain relief advocates such as Reynolds and Fisher are concerned primarily with protecting patients' access to effective opioid pain relievers, harm reductionists such as Das Gupta are concerned primarily with preventing overdoses and other deaths related to drug use. While the harm reduction movement has traditionally focused on the use of street drugs, like cocaine and heroin, the rapid increase in prescription drug deaths may be a sign that it needs to broaden its focus.

"When you look at deaths at the state level and start to pull actual medical examiner case files, you find that the people dying are really a mix of pain patients, non-medical opioid users, and heroin users," said Das Gupta. "Here in North Carolina, we found that 80% of prescription overdose deaths were people with prescriptions. That doesn't mean they were chronic pain patients, though; they could have been people scamming docs. What we have is a really heterogenous mix, and the way things are coded doesn't offer enough nuance."

Project Lazarus is trying to adjust, he said. "We've been tweaking traditional programs to a different setting. Instead of using needle exchange programs, we're doing it through doctors' offices," explained Das Gupta. "Anyone who prescribes opioids for pain in North Carolina should be considering naloxone for specific populations," he said. "There is an ethical responsibility for physicians not to endanger their patients' lives."

"We're working on overdose prevention here in New York, but the people we have had access to are the heroin users," said Dr. Sharon Stancliff, medical director for the Harm Reduction Coalition, for whom she oversees drug overdose prevention projects in New York and San Francisco. "But the bigger problem is people misusing or abusing opioids. We need to be getting information out to the general practitioners who are prescribing these drugs. They need to be prescribing Narcan with all those meds," she suggested.

"We need to change the national agenda about overdose prevention," said Stancliff. "Naloxone is an answer, but it's not the only answer. We need naloxone, we need education, we need more research."

And, Stancliff added, the federal government needs to quit being an obstacle and start helping to solve the problem. "We don't have an early alert system, we have really bad surveillance, we're not getting the research done," Stancliff complained. "We don't know who is dying -- is it the people being prescribed the drugs? Is it people they're giving them to? Is it illicit drug users? We don't know enough. The Centers for Disease Control don't quite cover this, and it should be a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) issue, too. Maybe in the next administration, when harm reduction isn't a dirty word."

Harm Reduction: Bill to End Federal Needle Exchange Ban Filed

Rep. Jose Serrano (D-NY) and 25 cosponsors filed a bill Wednesday that would remove all restrictions on the use of federal funds for needle exchange programs (NEPs). The bill, the Community AIDS and Hepatitis Prevention (CAHP) Act of 2008 (H.R. 6680) is aimed at reducing the spread of blood-borne diseases that may be transmitted through infected syringes, such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C.

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/files/needle-exchange-logo.gif
widely-used syringe exchange graphic
NEPs have been proven to reduce the spread of blood-borne diseases, and there are now about 185 legal NEPs operating in the US. But since 1988, when the first legal NEP was approved, Congress has barred the use of any federal funds for such programs. While about half of NEPs receive some state or local funding, the federal ban means the cash-starved programs are blocked from accessing a major potential funding source.

The CAHP Act is endorsed by a more than a hundred HIV/AIDS, hep C, and other public policy groups. They have been pushing for more than a year to get the ban lifted. The Harm Reduction Coalition was one of the groups welcoming Serrano's bill.

"The Harm Reduction Coalition applauds Rep. Serrano's leadership in taking on the outdated and harmful federal funding ban", said Allan Clear, the group's executive director. "The federal funding ban has resulted in tens of thousands of needless HIV and hepatitis C infections. We know that syringe exchange works -- it's time for Congress to pave the way, and give communities the flexibility to use their federal HIV prevention dollars according to their own needs and priorities."

Medical Marijuana: DEA Seizes Medical Marijuana Seized By Seattle Police

Washington state has a medical marijuana law, and the city of Seattle has an ordinance making marijuana offenses the lowest law enforcement priority, but that didn't stop Seattle police from raiding the Lifevine medical marijuana co-op two weeks ago, seizing hundreds of patient files, as well as 12 ounces of dried buds and several pounds of leaf.

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/files/medmj-bag.jpg
California medical marijuana bags (courtesy Daniel Argo via Wikimedia)
In the wake of pointed criticism, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg declined to press charges against co-op operator Martin Martinez and ordered the return of the patient files. But police did not return the co-op's stolen property -- the medical marijuana.

Now, it has become clear the medical marijuana will never be returned. The Seattle Police announced Wednesday that the DEA, acting at the request of US Attorney Jeff Sullivan, took the medicine last Friday.

The DEA tersely confirmed it had seized the medicine. "Accordingly, the DEA has seized and processed the marijuana for destruction; that concludes this matter," agency spokesperson Jodie Underwood said in a statement reported by the Associated Press.

Hey, Dirtbags, Ya Wanna Know What Cops Think About Frank's Decrim Bill (and You)?

Pot smokers and drug reformers weren't the only people interested in Barney Frank's news conference yesterday about his decriminalization bill. The law enforcement web site Police 1 noted it as well and posted a short piece asking its readership what they thought. The piece, Are Small Pot Busts Taking Cops Away From Important Work? What Do You Think?, was a calm, unbiased look at the decrim bill and what it would (and wouldn't) do. I wish I could say the same about the responses. Now, before I get into the meat of the matter, I would be remiss if I didn't point out that the responses are not necessarily reflective of police officers' views in general, but are only the responses of a self-selected set of anonymous posters who have registered with Police 1 and who Police 1 says are verifiably law enforcement personnel. That caveat notwithstanding, the posters offer a pretty depressing look into the mind-set of at least some cops. Here are some of them:
Raymundo: I think we all know that pot heads just want to be able to do what they want. Marijuana kills brain cells and they don't come back, hello we need those. Marijuana should stay illegal and I hope congress continues to see that it should be illegal.
SPD853: I think we waste time on plenty of crimes. It is our job. Those cops who think it is a waste of time just "wind test" it anyway (if they do anything at all).
I hadn't heard the phrase "wind test" before. I think that means when they just steal your property, open up the baggie and let the goodies blow away in the wind. That's pretty rude, but preferable to getting arrested, I guess.
Chr1s11: How many of those "small" pot busts have been turned over for info leading to a much larger bust for a much worse controlled substance. The pot heads tend to give up the crack dealer to save the misdemeanor record. Besides, it's still an illegal substance that causes serious dificulty for someone to be a productive individual. Pot heads are the loosers that turn into coke/crack/meth heads. Then comes the violent crime they have to commit to support the habbit.
Well, of course. We all know that pot smokers are crack heads who inevitably turn to violent crime to support their habits. The only other comment I have on this poster is that anyone who can't spell loser correctly probably shouldn't be calling other people losers. He would be better off going back to school and actually passing eighth grade this time.
Baltoblue: I'd rather lock people up for Marijuana all day long then taking 6 reports a day because people can't resolve small problems on their own. The fact is that people can't resolve small problems on their own. The fact is that Marijuana is great PC for searching vehicles (on smell), and also leads to larger cases. I for one, have never locked up a nuerosurgeon for pot, and most that I lock up for pot are involved in larger crimes.
A couple of things on this one: I know I shouldn't pick on people for misspellings, but when you're trying to call pot smokers dumb, you should probably spell "neurosurgeon" correctly. Secondly, Baltoblue's point that pot is great for providing PC (probable cause) for searching cars is a common theme on this board.
Mac25: It is already hard enough to get a conviction when they wont emit it is their property but now they will say it is for personal use and I am not selling. When you compare the drugs (marijuana/alcohol) they both have their down falls but seem to be the lesser evil of all the drugs out there. With that said, the battle on drugs including marijuana has gone on too long to turn around and try to make it legal. I would say most, at least 75, of the people that use marijuana are dirt bags and are involved in other crimes or some how connected to those that commit the crimes. The marijuana arrests are and can be used to assist us (police) in catching those criminals. If it is legalized it will be thrown in our faces day in and day out by these criminals.
This guy's reasoning skills are right up there with his spelling and composition skills. So, 75 (percent, I assume, unless he's personally counting up the dirt bags) of pot smokers are "dirt bags" and are involved in other crimes or know somebody involved in other crimes or live in the same country as people committing other crimes or something. But at least there was one poster who was sympathetic:
In 14 years of active road service as a cop, I have never responded to a call involving anyone who had smoked a joint and was ready to fight with their wife or anyone else for that matter. Yes, I think to much time is spent on arrests involving small amounts of pot. Alcohol, on the other hand, has cost our country Billions of dollars and a tremendous loss of life. While I don't think pot should be legal, I think we need to re-think this issue.
There are more comments on the web site. Check 'em out if you have the stomach for seeing what those people who are supposed to serve and protect you think about you. As for me, I always try to treat police officers with the same respect they show me.

Capitol Hill Press Conference 7/30: Rep. Barney Frank and Advocates to Discuss Marijuana Bill

 

MEDIA ADVISORY   
JULY 29, 2008

Capitol Hill Press Conference July 30: Congressman Barney Frank and Advocates to Discuss Marijuana De-Penalization Bill

CONTACT: Bruce Mirken, MPP director of communications ............... 415-668-6403 or 202-215-4205
                   Dan Bernath, MPP assistant director of communications    202-462-5747 ex. 115

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- U.S. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and representatives of organizations supporting reform of marijuana laws will hold a press conference on Wednesday to discuss Frank's "Personal Use of Marijuana by Responsible Adults Act of 2008." The bill, H.R. 5843, would remove federal criminal penalties for personal possession of up to 100 grams of marijuana or the nonprofit transfer of up to an ounce of marijuana. It would not change federal statutes forbidding cultivation, import, export or for-profit sale of marijuana.

    WHAT: Press conference to discuss H.R. 5843.

    WHO: U.S. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.); Rob Kampia, Marijuana Policy Project; Bill Piper, Drug Policy Alliance; Allen St. Pierre, National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

    WHEN: Wednesday, July 30, 10:00 a.m.

    WHERE: Room 2220, Rayburn House Office Building.

    With more than 25,000 members and 100,000 e-mail subscribers nationwide, the Marijuana Policy Project is the largest marijuana policy reform organization in the United States. MPP believes that the best way to minimize the harm associated with marijuana is to regulate marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol. For more information, please visit http://MarijuanaPolicy.org.
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Location: 
Washington, DC
United States

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