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Three More Drug War Deaths in June

An Indiana man died after eating drugs during a traffic stop, an Ohio man wanted on drug charges was killed by police during a traffic stop, and an Oregon man was killed by police breaking up an apparent street drug deal. Lance Royal, 31, Jeremy Linhart, 30, and Allen Lee Bellew, 29, become the 30th,  31st, and 32nd persons to die so far this year in US domestic drug law enforcement operations.

According to Fort Wayne 21 Alive, citing police sources, Fort Wayne Police with an arrest warrant for another man pulled over a vehicle Royal was in. Both occupants of the vehicle then tried to eat drugs in a bid to escape arrest. The other person, a woman, complained of distress and was hospitalized, but Royal refused treatment at first. But he then collapsed and went into cardiac arrest before medics could arrive. Medics tried CPR, then took him to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

According to the Findlay Courier, citing police sources, on June 9 at about 3 a.m., a Findlay police officer pulled over a car in which Jeremy Linhart was a passenger. The officer ordered both people out of the car, and both complied, but then Linhart tried to get back in the car and was shot in a scuffle with the officer.

Linhart was being sought on a warrant for failure to comply with his bond conditions for his cocaine charge. Police found a gun in the car.

According to the Portland Tribune, police investigating suspicious activity in a parking lot on the night of June 28 made contact with three people standing by a car. While police were talking to the men, Bellew reached into the car, pulled out a gun, and pointed it at them. Both officers opened fire, shooting Bellew, who was pronounced dead at the scene.

It's not clear if the police were in uniform or undercover. Bellew's gun turned out to be a starter pistol.

Bellew was from Eugene and was wanted in Lane County on a failure to appear warrant for heroin possession and probation violation for resisting arrest. 

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A lying narc goes to jail, a bribe-taking probation officer gets indicted, a deputy's pill habit gets the best of him, and a woman cop's heroin dealing gets her in trouble. Let's get to it:

In St. Louis, a St. Louis police officer was arrested last Wednesday after a police raid on a home where she was staying turned up heroin and guns. Officer Natalie Williams, 34, was the target of the raid, and police said they found two guns in her bedroom, heroin in her closet, more than $10,000 in cash and assorted drug-selling paraphernalia. She had been suspended without pay for "conduct unbecoming an officer" back in February, and that unspecified conduct apparently led to a closer investigation of her activities. She's in jail on a $30,000 cash bond.

In Elizabeth, New Jersey, a state probation officer was indicted last Thursday on charges she took bribes from a client to help him pass a drug test. Rhonda Battle, 46, had been assigned to work with defendants in the state drug court program. She is now charged with two counts of official misconduct and three counts of bribery. She allegedly was paid $200 for each drug test passed.

In West Palm Beach, Florida, a former undercover narcotics deputy pleaded guilty last Friday to four misdemeanor counts after he got caught making false reports that he bought crack cocaine at a Riviera Beach residence and using those reports to obtain a search warrant for the home and falsely arresting the resident. Joaquin Fonseca-Ortiz, 49, had faced five counts of official misconduct, along with with charges of possession of cocaine and giving false information to a law enforcement officer during an investigation. He was sentenced to a year in jail.

In Bennington, Vermont, a former Bennington County sheriff's deputy pleaded guilty last Friday to multiple drug-related counts. Gary Herrington, 42, went down after a woman he was sexually involved with accused him of asking her to sell prescription drugs and then, after an argument, he threatened on social media to have her arrested. When he was arrested, police found more than 600 opioid pain relievers at his home He copped to a felony count of distribution of narcotics, a felony count of forgery, a misdemeanor count of neglecting his duty and two misdemeanor counts of possession of narcotics. In a plea agreement, he received deferred adjudication—if he stays clean for three years, the charges go away. 

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Two southern sheriff's deputies and a New England jail guard make the dishonor roll this week.

In Tazewell, Tennessee, a former Claiborne County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Thursday on charges he solicited bribes to make drug and weapons charges go away. Robert Glenn Chadwell was caught red-handed taking $2,000 from a man and asking for more as part of an agreement to not charge him. He has been arrested on unspecified charges, and is now out of jail on a $500,000 bond.

In Mobile, Alabama, a former Mobile County sheriff's detective was arrested Monday for stealing drugs from investigations he was assigned to. Clifton Wayne Holifield went down after an internal investigation found he was pilfering "relatively small" amounts of pills for his own use. He had resigned last November, just after the investigation began. He faces 12 counts of second-degree theft of property.

In Central Falls, Rhode Island, a former Central Falls jail guard was sentenced last Friday to three years' probation and 300 hours of community service for delivering pills and pornography to an inmate at the Wyatt Detention Center. Scott Denton, 32, copped to one count of bribery.

Chronicle AM: Dalai Lama on MedMJ, OH Initiative Shenanigans, First MA Dispensary Will Open, More (6/22/05)

Ohio's political establishment gears up to block a controversial legalization initiative, the Dalai Lama supports medical marijuana, the Obama administration removes a barrier to marijuana research, Louisiana's governor rejects clemency for a man doing 13 years for two joints, and more.

The Dalai Lama is down with medical marijuana. (wikipedia.org)
Marijuana Policy

Ohio Official Says Proposed Amendment Could Block Marijuana Legalization Initiative. GOP Secretary of State Jon Husted said last Friday that an amendment to block private-interest monopolies would render the ResponsibleOhio legalization initiative invalid if the former passed. Husted and Republican lawmakers have vowed to adopt a resolution to place the monopoly amendment on the ballot. Husted said that if that amendment passes, the ResponsibleOhio initiative would be invalid, even if it also passed, and even if it passed with more votes than the monopoly amendment. The ResponsibleOhio initiative would limit commercial marijuana growing to ten specified locations, the owners of which are also the financiers of the initiative campaign.

Montana Anti-Marijuana Initiative Proposed. Billings anti-pot zealot Steve Zabawa is back at it. In 2014, he proposed an initiative saying that any federal Schedule I controlled substance (read: marijuana) "may not be legally possessed, received, transferred, manufactured, cultivated, trafficked, transported or used in Montana." It failed for lack of signatures. Now he has filed the same initiative again.

Medical Marijuana

Dalai Lama Endorses Medical Marijuana. Speaking at a an event in Guanajuato, Mexico, last week, the spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism said he supported the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Speaking in response to a question about legalizing marijuana, the Dalai clarified that he opposed its recreational use, but using it medicinally would be "the exception."

White House Removes Crucial Barrier to Marijuana Research. The Obama administration announced today it is ending a major impediment to marijuana research, the Public Health Service review. That hurdle, created under the Clinton administration, required all applications for marijuana research to undergo an individual review, slowing down marijuana research and making it more difficult to study than heroin or cocaine.

First Massachusetts Dispensary Approved to Sell Medical Marijuana; One Inspection Left. The Alternative Therapies Group in Salem is ready to start selling to patients after winning a temporary waiver from state testing guidelines widely viewed as too strict. The Department of Public Health has said it will reconsider the standards. The dispensary is one of four in the state that have started growing their own supply, and is the furthest along. It must still pass a final inspection before it opens its doors. Much more at the link.

Drug Testing

California Appeals Court Upholds Making Employer Pay for Emotional Distress from Random Workplace Drug Testing. The court upheld an award for the intentional infliction of emotional distress on two law office workers pressured into taking a random drug test by their employer. The employee handbook called for random drug testing for certain safety-sensitive categories, or after an accident or for probable cause, but the company compelled all employees to undergo drug testing on one day in 2011. The two plaintiffs were awarded $15,000 each in damages by the trial court, which is what the appeals court just upheld.

Law Enforcement

Philly Court Throws Out 58 Convictions Tied to Dirty Narcs. A Common Pleas Court judge last Friday reversed 58 convictions in cases linked to six former Philadelphia narcotics officers. The six were cleared of criminal corruption charges in federal court in May, but their misdeeds have tainted hundreds of cases. The Public Defender's Office is seeking reversals of 1,370 cases, and the city is facing 135 civil rights lawsuits based on the unit's behavior. Since 2013, prosecutors have refused to prosecute cases tied to the squad after numerous allegations they planted evidence, beat and robbed suspects, and falsified paperwork. Much more at the link.

Sentencing

Louisiana Governor Rejects Clemency for Black Man Doing 13 Years for Two Joints. Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) last week denied a clemency petition for Bernard Noble, sentenced to 13 years in prison for two joints under the state's draconian marijuana laws. Jindal said he rejected clemency because Noble had not yet served 10 years in prison.

International

China's Wide Open Illegal Drug Chemical Factories. It's pretty darned easy to get new synthetic drugs by the pound or more from Chinese manufacturers, according to this New York Times report. Need spice or flakka or bath salts? It's just a few clicks away.

Chronicle AM: Delaware Decriminalizes, Supremes Make Synthetic Convictions More Difficult, More (6/19/05)

The marijuana reform bandwagon rolls through Delaware, federal bills on opiates and racial profiling get filed, the Supreme Court issues an interesting decision on synthetic drug sales, and more.

The Supreme Court clarifies that criminal intent matters. (supremecourt.gov)
Marijuana Policy

Delaware Decriminalizes Marijuana Possession. With the signature of Gov. Jack Markell (D) Thursday night on House Bill 39, Delaware becomes the 20th state to either decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana or make it legal for adults. The new law, which goes into effect in six months, removes the criminal penalties for the possession of up to an ounce by an adult, replacing them with a civil infraction punishable by a maximum $100 fine. For those between 18 and 21, a first offense would be a civil infraction, while any more would be misdemeanors. For people under 18, possession would remain a misdemeanor. Public use would be a misdemeanor punishable by a $200 fine and up to five days in jail. That includes moving vehicles, public areas, and outdoors on private property within 10 feet of street, sidewalk, or any other areas generally accessible to the public.

Missouri Cannabis Conference Next Weekend. Missouri advocacy groups Show Me Cannabis and Missouri NORML are holding a joint conference beginning next Friday in Kansas City. Click on the title link for all the details.

Heroin and Opiates

Federal Bill to Deal With Opiate Use Filed. A bipartisan group of six House members Thursday filed HR 2805 as a multi-pronged effort to grapple with opiate and heroin use. Several other bills on the topic have already been filed. This one would increase prescription monitoring requirements, create an inter-agency task to develop best practices for pain management, create a grant program to increase the number of first responders carrying the opiate overdose reversal drug naloxone, and direct the drug czar's office to establish a public awareness program.

New Synthetic Drugs

Supreme Court Rules People Can't Be Convicted for Selling Synthetic Drugs If It's Not Clear They're Illegal. A unanimous US Supreme Court ruled Thursday that people cannot be convicted for selling synthetic drugs unless prosecutors prove they knew the drugs were prohibited by law. Stephen McFadden had been convicted of violating the Controlled Substance Analog Enforcement Act for selling "bath salts," and a federal appeals court ruled that trial court jury instructions saying he could be convicted if the jury found he intended the drugs for human consumption. But the Supreme Court disagreed, saying prosecutors must prove the defendant knew the substance was either a controlled substance or an analog. The case is McFadden v. United States.

Law Enforcement

Federal Racial Profiling Bill Introduced. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD) Thursday filed S 1610, which would eliminate racial profiling by police officers and promote accountability for state and local law enforcement. The bill also has provisions to eliminate sentencing disparities and promote reentry programs. It has not yet been assigned to a committee.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Four Chicago-land cops get popped for testilying, a New York cop tried to impress a woman and ends up on probation, another jail guard goes down, and more. Let's get to it:

In Chicago, four Chicago area police officers were arrested last Monday on perjury charges for allegedly lying under oath at a drug hearing last year. Three of the four are narcotics officers with the Chicago Police, while the fourth is an officer in suburban Glenview. They are accused of "testilying" about a traffic stop in which they claimed to smell marijuana. But their own dash-cams did them in, showing that they immediately opened the vehicle door at the traffic stop. The officers are Chicago narcs William Pruente, Sgt. James Padar, and Vince Morgan and Glenview Officer James Horn. All are charged with felony counts of perjury, obstructing justice and official misconduct. If convicted, they face probation up to 5 years in prison.

In State College, Pennsylvania, a former State College police officer was arrested last Friday on charges he stole drugs from the department. Thomas Dann, 56, is accused of stealing cocaine and opiate pain relievers from the evidence room, where he was one of two evidence custodians. He faces multiple felony drug charges, as well a misdemeanor charges of theft and tampering with evidence.

In Doylestown, Pennsylvania, a Bucks County jail guard was arrested last Friday for allegedly smuggling suboxone into the jail. John Dingle, 34, is charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and delivery of a controlled substance.

In Albany, New York, a Troy police officer was sentenced last Friday to three years' probation and a $5,000 fine after admitting that he tipped off a drug dealer about a pending raid last year. Officer Brian Gross confessed that he told a woman friend he hoped to impress that the narc squad was investigating her brother and planned to raid his home. Gross went down after a drug sweep of multiple residences came up with no drugs, and his superiors grew suspicious. He pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors, divulging evidence secured by eavesdropping to its intended target and official misconduct.

In Las Cruces, New Mexico, a former Dona Ana County jail guard was sentenced Tuesday to a year and a day in federal prison for trying to smuggle drugs into the jail. Francisco Balderrama, 27, had copped to conspiracy to distribute heroin, meth, and cocaine. Four others were arrested in the scheme as well.

Chronicle AM: OR Pot Sales Compromise, CO Employers Can Fire MedMJ Patients, More (6/15/05)

A legislative compromise would let Oregon counties where voters opposed legalization ban pot shops, the Colorado Supreme Court rules in favor of employers over medical marijuana patients, two big eastern cities are on the verge of shifting their drug enforcement policies, and more.

No pot shops like this for Eastern Oregon under a compromise being bruited by the legislature.
Marijuana Policy

Powerful Arizona Business Group Will Oppose Legalization Efforts. One of the state's most influential business groups, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry, has announced it will oppose looming legalization initiatives there. The group said it is worried about more workplace injuries and workers' compensation claims. "We arrived at our decision after careful consideration of the experiences of other states that have legalized marijuana, the arguments of proponents and research by our foundation. After looking at all the facts, we've determined that there is no upside to the legalization of recreational marijuana," said Chamber President and CEO Glenn Hamer. "The negative consequences that could result from legalization affect our business environment and the public's health."

Oregon Legislators Make It Easier to Ban Pot Sales in Eastern Counties. In a bid to get their legal marijuana regulation bill, House Bill 3400, back on track, leaders of the committee dealing with marijuana have agreed to new legislative language that would allow local governments to ban pot sales in counties where at least 55% of voters rejected the Measure 91 legalization initiative in 2014. All of those counties are in the sparsely populated and politically conservative eastern part of the state.

Medical Marijuana

Colorado Supreme Court Rules Employers Can Fire Medical Marijuana Patients for Off-Duty Use. The Court today affirmed lower court decisions allowing employers to fire employees for marijuana use while off-duty. The decision hinged on the state's lawful off-duty activities statute. The Court held that in order for the off-duty conduct to be considered "lawful," it must be legal under both state and federal law. The unanimous decision was not a surprise to advocates working to reform marijuana law and policy in Colorado. The case is Coats v. Dish Network. Coats is a quadriplegic who worked in customer service for Dish, but was fired after a random drug test turned up marijuana metabolites.

Law Enforcement

Washington, DC, Police to Shift Drug Enforcement Focus. DC Metro Police Chief Cathy Lanier has announced that the department will revise its drug war strategy by focusing on suppliers instead of street-level buyers and by putting undercover officers back in uniform. "Our main goal is the supply," Lanier said. "We don't want to focus police efforts on just people who are addicted. We want to be focusing on the people who are bringing the stuff in."

Boston Mayor Says City Could Offer Addicts Treatment Instead of Arrest. Mayor Marty Walsh (D) said that Boston could follow in the footsteps of nearby Gloucester and offer treatment instead of arrest to opiate users seeking help. Gloucester recently announced it had adopted that policy. "I commend Gloucester for what they're doing," Walsh said. "I think it's a great idea, a great pilot program, I'm looking forward to seeing how it works and taking that model and possibly using it here in Boston." The chance of the city adopting the program is "probably pretty good... I'm not sure when, but it's probably fairly good odds," he said.

International

>Costa Rican Ministry of Health Releases Criteria for Pending Medical Marijuana Bill.Earlier this month, the Costa Rican Ministry of Health outlined the details for the implementation of a pending bill to research and regulate marijuana for medical and industrial purposes. The bill was introduced by ruling Citizen Action Party legislator Marvin Atencio last year to tax marijuana products and regulate the use of medical marijuana through registration cards for patients provided by the Ministry of Health. Ten months after Atencios's proposal, the Ministry of Health released its criteria for the implementation of the bill. Among the conditions specified by the Ministry are that medical marijuana must be used as a last resort and that recreational use of marijuana will continue to be illegal. Medical marijuana will be distributed through conventional drug stores and will follow the same prescription rules outlined by the Costa Rican Social Security System. One of Atencio's proposals to issue marijuana identity cards was discarded by the Ministry under the argument that it would entail discrimination. Atencio responded by saying that the cards would protect medical marijuana patients in encounters with law enforcement. Other conditions included the implementation of educational campaigns for the general public on what is permissible under the new bill and an emphasis on an existing law prohibiting the monopolization of research on marijuana and hemp plants.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Cops hauling pot, cops protecting loads of cocaine, cops selling ecstasy, and a whole bunch of cops with apparent prescription pill problems, Let's get to it:

In Pennsauken, New Jersey, a Camden County police officer was arrested in late April on drug charges, but his arrest wasn't made public until now. Officer Matthew Van Houten, 28, was one of 32 people arrested in the mass bust of two independent drug trafficking groups on the Jersey Shore. He is charged with possession of cocaine while employed as a police officer. He went down in Operation Tidal Wave, which netted 10 pounds of cocaine, three ounces of heroin, 16 pounds of marijuana, a thousand pills, seven vehicles, and $125,000 in cash.

In Sulphur, Louisiana, a Cameron County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Tuesday with 18 pounds of marijuana in his car. Deputy Derek Nothnagel had been pulled over on I-10 by state troopers. He is charged with possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, use and sale of drug paraphernalia, improper lane usage, following too closely and expired inspection decal. He was booked into the Calcasieu Parish Correctional Center. His bond was set at more than $27,000.

In Virginia Beach, Virginia, a Virginia Beach police officer was arrested last Wednesday for allegedly fraudulently obtaining prescription drugs. Officer Harry Kephart Jr. is accused of misrepresenting facts when he went to a medical facility after being denied drugs by an emergency room doctor the same day. He's out on bond now.

In Conway, Arkansas, a former assistant county jail administrator was arrested Monday for taking prescription drugs prescribed to an inmate. Capt. Lloyd Vincent, 40, resigned last year after an investigation into missing prescription drugs began and is now charged with fraud or deceit to obtain narcotic drugs. He has admitted taking the drugs and leading a nurse to believe that he was disposing of them. He was, but not in the way intended.

In Yulee, Florida, a Nassau County sheriff's deputy was arrested Tuesday for allegedly selling his prescription pain medications. Deputy Stuart James Raulerson went down after authorities received a tip he was selling hydrocodone that had been prescribed to him. He is charged with sale of a controlled substance and conspiracy to engage in trafficking hydrocodone, both felonies. He's also been fired.

In Savannah, Georgia, a former Savannah-Chatham police officer was sentenced last Wednesday to serve six months in jail for selling Ecstasy. Derrick Andre Fullmer had copped to one count each of possession and distribution of the drug. He also must pay a fine and do three years of supervised release.

In Miami, a former NYPD officer was sentenced last Friday to 10 years in federal prison after he provided armed security for a $200,000 cocaine deal that turned out to be a sting. Phillip Leroy, 28, had earlier pleaded guilty to federal drug trafficking conspiracy charges. He went down in Sunrise, a Florida town notorious for its drug stings and asset forfeitures. He agreed to provide security for a load of 22 pounds of cocaine, but was busted when he went to a warehouse to get it.

In Pacific, Missouri, a former Pacific police officer was sentenced Monday to five years in prison for stealing drug evidence from the department. Arthur Tullock, 56, had pleaded guilty to two counts of stealing controlled substances. Local prosecutors said they had to throw out about a dozen drug cases because he consumed the evidence.

Chronicle AM: AMA Wants Protection for Pot Docs, LA Marijuana Sentencing Reformed, More (6/9/15)

Another GOP presidential contender weighs in on marijuana policy, the nation's harshest pot laws are about to get a little better, the AMA sticks up for medical marijuana, er, cannabis, doctors, and more.

Carly Fiorina says marijuana legalization is a states' rights issue. (wikimedia.org)
Marijuana Policy

Carly Fiorina Says Marijuana Legalization a States' Right Issue. Republican presidential contender Carly Fiorina said Tuesday that while she personally opposed marijuana legalization, it should be up to the states. "I don't support legalized marijuana for a whole host of reasons, including the fact that this is a very complex chemical substance, and when we tell young people it is just like drinking a beer, we are not telling them the truth," she said. "But I think Colorado voters made a choice, I don't support their choice, but I do support their right to make that choice."

Louisiana Marijuana Sentencing Reforms Pass; Governor Expected to Sign. The state legislature Monday gave final approval to House Bill 149, which will make the state's draconian possession penalties somewhat less so. Gov. Bobby Jindal has signaled that he will sign the bill. For first offenders, the maximum penalty shrinks from six months to 15 days in jail; for second offenders, the penalty shrinks from a five-year felony to a six-month misdemeanor; for third-strikers, the penalty shrinks from a 20-year felony to a two-year felony. The bill also allows people charged with first-time possession to have their records expunged if they don't get busted again for pot within two years.

Oregon Legislators Have Tentative Pot Deal. Legislative negotiators have reached initial agreement on a way to move forward with implementing legalization. The deal foresees a possible 20% retail sales tax, with municipalities collecting up to 3%. The key question of whether municipalities can prohibit pot shops is being deferred to the courts or a work group charged with making recommendations for 2016. See this series of amendments for more details.

Medical Marijuana

AMA Calls for Protections for Medical Marijuana Doctors. Meeting at its annual convention in Chicago, the American Medical Association has passed a resolution called "Immunity from Federal Prosecution for Cannabis Prescribing." The resolution is "consistent with AMA policy to protect patient-physician communications about treatment options, supporting a public health approach rather than a law-enforcement focus, for individuals possessing cannabis for personal use and opposing government interference with the practice of medicine," the nation's largest doctors' group said.

Industrial Hemp

Nevada Governor Signs Hemp Research Bill. Gov. Bryan Sandoval last Friday signed into law Senate Bill 305, which will allow colleges, universities, and the state Agriculture Department to grow hemp for research purposes in a pilot program. But it doesn't allow commercial hemp production.

Law Enforcement

California School District Pays Out for Using Student as Drug Sting Bait. The Temecula Valley Unified School District will pay $200,000 to a family whose 14-year-old learning disabled son was recruited by an assistant principal to serve as bait in a drug sting. The sting took place even after the boy's mother objected. The boy's mother said the school's actions endangered her son, leading to him being labeled a snitch and to threats of physical violence against him. The sting was an effort to catch another student with marijuana.

(This article was prepared by StoptheDrugWar.org's lobbying arm, Drug Reform Coordination Network, which also pays the cost of maintaining this web site. DRCNet Foundation takes no positions on candidates for public office, in compliance with section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, and does not pay for reporting that could be interpreted or misinterpreted as doing so.)

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Another jail guard goes down, a probation officer may need probation himself, and a Florida sheriff's officer was looking up information he wasn't supposed to. Let's get to it:

In Jacksonville, Florida, a Jacksonville Sheriff's Office patrol officer was arrested last Thursday as part of a federal drug roundup that netted 13 people. Officer Michael Rounsville, 46, is charged with unauthorized use of the National Crime Information Center database. He allegedly used it to check an undercover agent's criminal history without authorization. Others in the case face drug trafficking and money laundering charges.

In Charlotte, North Carolina, a Mecklenburg County probation officer was arrested last Friday on heroin and pain pill charges. Justin Shame McGlamery is accused of buying heroin four times in the past two weeks and selling hydrocodone and oxycodone. At last report, he was still trying to make a $125,000 bail bond.

In Tecumseh, Nebraska, a Nebraska prison guard was arrested last Saturday for allegedly offering to sneak marijuana in to a prisoner last year. Guard Michael Splittgerber, 21, went down after an inmate ratted him out. When authorities searched him on the job, they found a joint inside a state-issued plastic glove on him. At last report, he was in jail and trying to make bail.

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