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Thousands Across Mexico Call for New Strategy in Drug Prohibition War

Location: 
Mexico
In early April, thousands of Mexicans poured into the streets in over 20 Mexican cities to raise their voices in a chorus of protest against the government's ineffective and increasingly unpopular military campaign against drug trafficking organizations. These mass mobilizations mark some of the most heated condemnation yet of violence and impunity associated with President Calderón's U.S.-supported "drug war." The day of protest has been described as a historic "sea change" in Mexican public opinion.
Publication/Source: 
The Huffington Post (CA)
URL: 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-haugaard/thousands-across-mexico-c_b_851214.html

Mexico's Orphans Are Casualties of Drug Prohibition War

Location: 
Mexico
"At least 12,000 children have lost one or both of their parents," said Gustavo de la Rosa, an official from Mexico's human rights commission. Those motherless and fatherless children, said de la Rosa, are a lasting and tragic legacy of Mexico's drug prohibition war. After witnessing the execution of a parent, the children -- even if physically uninjured themselves -- face a lifetime of emotional scarring.
Publication/Source: 
Agence France-Presse (France)
URL: 
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jCtIvBVbEyDDJeQlCQjavLmwlXWA?docId=CNG.ce4ce7a67bd66d9150ddc80ebf588abb.1e1

Mexico, Just Say No to America's Prohibitionist War on Drugs (Opinion)

Location: 
Mexico
Gwynne Dyer, an independent journalist based in London, opines on the state of Mexico's drug prohibition war against the backdrop of a remarkable event that occurred in Mexico last week. Tens of thousands of Mexicans gathered in the main squares of cities across the country to demand an end to the "war on drugs". In the Zocalo, in the heart of Mexico City, they chanted "no more blood" and many called for the resignation of President Felipe Calderon, who began the war by using the army against the drug trafficking organizations in late 2006.
Publication/Source: 
The New Zealand Herald (New Zealand)
URL: 
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=10718630

Mexican Mass Grave Complex Reveals 88 Bodies

Location: 
San Fernando, TAM
Mexico
At least 88 bodies have been found in a complex of mass graves in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, security officials say, likely victims of the country's ongoing drug prohibition war. The graves are the largest concentration ever found in one area in Mexico.
Publication/Source: 
Agence France-Presse (France)
URL: 
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5haQO4mwhw6uuq7RQt-92sLzQcLXA?docId=CNG.2ed49b3d18e8c8cd9b8d7077e790f737.131

Drug Trafficking Organizations Seek to Exploit Corrupt Federal Agents

As the Homeland Security Department's Customs and Border Protection (CBP) bureau has ratcheted up efforts to cope with the tide of crime sweeping across the Southwest border, Mexican drug trafficking organizations have stepped up efforts to infiltrate CBP and other federal, state and local agencies responsible for policing the border.
Publication/Source: 
Government Executive (DC)
URL: 
http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0411/041111mag1.htm

Maras and Zetas: An Alliance from Hell

Location: 
Mexico
Reports of the Zetas and Maras drug trafficking organizations doing drug deals together or assassinating mutual enemies have been floating around for several years. But human rights workers and police in southern Mexico and Guatemala say they have now formed a more concrete alliance, in which they work together on kidnappings and acts of intimidation and terror.
Publication/Source: 
GlobalPost (MA)
URL: 
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/mexico/110330/drug-gangs-maras-zetas

Mexico's Street Gangs Following Larger Drug Trafficking Organizations' Violence Blueprint

Location: 
Mexico
Recent decapitations and killings have residents on edge over whether local street gangs are mimicking larger drug trafficking organization violence in the nation's capital. "I think of these groups as cells, as franchises," said Alfredo Castillo, attorney general for Mexico state, the suburban area surrounding Mexico City. "As franchises what do they want? They want the know-how, the business model, and in the end, they want their backing in case of an extraordinary problem."
Publication/Source: 
Fox News (US)
URL: 
http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2011/04/03/mexicos-street-gangs-following-cartel-violence-blueprint-edit-item/

Texas Representative Says Drug Trafficking Organizations Threatening US Agents

Location: 
Mexico
Mexican drug trafficking organization members threatened to kill U.S. agents working on the American side of the border. Republican Michael McCaul said a law enforcement bulletin was issued warning that Mexican traffickers were overheard plotting to kill Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents and Texas Rangers stationed along the border.
Publication/Source: 
WHTM (PA)
URL: 
http://www.abc27.com/story/14357839/lawmaker-says-cartels-threatening-us-agents

230,000 Displaced by Mexico Drug Prohibition War, Half May Have Come to the United States

Location: 
Mexico
A new study by the Swiss-based Internal Displacement Monitoring Center that at least 230,000 people have been displaced in Mexico because of drug prohibition violence and that about half of them may have taken refuge in the United States.
Publication/Source: 
Fox News (US)
URL: 
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/03/25/report-230000-displaced-mexico-drug-war-1121351146/

U.S. Led Drug Prohibition Wars Have Failed, Expert Tells Panama Conference

Speaking at a regional security conference, Hans Mathieu, director of the Friedrich Ebert Security Foundation, said using violent repression in the "war" against drugs doesn’t work and policies against drug trafficking, especially those headed by the United States, have failed.
Publication/Source: 
Newsroom Panama (Panama)
URL: 
http://www.newsroompanama.com/panama/2532-us-led-anti-drug-wars-have-failed-expert-tells-panama-conference.html

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