Britain's New Prime Minister Thinks Drugs Should Be Legal

David Cameron He probably won't admit it now, but Britain's new prime minister thinks drugs should be legal. David Cameron, whose Conservative Party (the Tories) ousted Labor in last week's election, told the UK paper The Independent that the United Nations should consider legalization. He also wanted Britain to revive its former practice of providing heroin maintenance for addicts, and to open safe injection sites too. According to The Independent, which did the interview in 2005 when Cameron was vying for the Conservative's leadership spot, Cameron favored "fresh thinking and a new approach" toward British drug policy, adding "we have to let 1,000 flowers bloom and look at all sorts of treatment models." Cameron started off well as a parliamentarian, initially backing the government's downgrading of cannabis (marijuana) penalties from schedule B to C. But as a tabloid-driven hysteria over marijuana in the UK unfolded, Cameron (and The Independent) did a foolish about face. Still, Cameron's past comments are on the record, and his personal instincts on the issue at least seem to be good ones. I am not going to hold my breath waiting for the Tories to roll out legalization proposals, Cameron's past statements notwithstanding. But Labor under Gordon Brown was abominable on the drug issue, so whatever left-leaning Britons may miss about the former Labor government, they likely won't miss the drug policy. If Cameron does want to do something about this, Britain's Transform Drug Policy Foundation has a "Blueprint for Regulation" report ready and waiting.
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Great now only if he wasnt a

Great now only if he wasnt a homophobic classist idiot he'd be a decent politician.

Lobbying the media

One of the biggest threats to UK reform seems to be the constant baying of the media, ready with sharpened claws the moment anyone raises the debate on decriminalisation. There needs to be constant pressure on the media to allow our police, politicians and services to ask the questions about the most effective way forward. Until the tabloid media are muzzled we will continue to criminalize people by the thousands!
The Curator
www.museumofdrugs.com

i agree with the guy above

i agree with the guy above me, if the media butted out politicians would be able to legalize drugs. at the moment if cannabis was made legal the press would probably jump all over Cameron making him lose face and his job security. the press are the worst problem in this country not drugs. they cause paranoia by only reporting bad news and make everything sound like its the end of the world. i.e. the M-kat problem, two people were suspected of dying from it so the press started talking about it and making it seem like it's the worst drug in the world until it it gets made illegal, and now months later we learn they hadnt even taken any.

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