Bitter, who's bitter? On the New Mexico medical marijuana vote.

The New Mexico House killed the medical marijuana bill there today on a vote of 36-33. The debate was filled with the usual bigotry, hypocrisy, and ignorance parading as expertise. I'm particularly irritated with Rep. John Heaton (D-Carlsbad), who, because he works as a pharmacist, apparently thinks he is an expert on medical marijuana. Here's what he had to say as reported in the Santa Fe New Mexican:
Opponents disputed that marijuana was an effective medicine. "Medically it just really has no value. For us to approve a drug like this tells our children and tells the rest of the people in this state that we, somehow as leaders, give tacit approval to the use of this drug," said Rep. John Heaton, D-Carlsbad and a pharmacist. "That is absolutely wrong for us to do." He described marijuana as "the No. 1 gateway drug to abusing other drugs in our society."
Heaton, who makes a living pushing pills, tells us authoritatively that marijuana has no medical value. Does he cite the scientific literature? No. Has he ever read the Journal of Cannabis Therapeutics? Not as far as we can tell. What is the basis for his claim of no medicinal value? There is none, except for his appeal to authority as a pharmacist, and therefore, someone who presumably knows about such things. Heaton also argues that approving the medicinal use of marijuana "tells the children…that we, somehow as leaders, give tacit approval to the use of this drug." Oh, really? Does that mean when he is dispensing prescription opiates like Oxycontin he is giving "tacit approval" of their recreational use? Or does he mean that his opposition to medical marijuana is so ideologically driven that he would rather forego its healing and ameloriating effects than risk having young people know it can be used medicinally? If it's the former case, Heaton is a hypocrite of the highest order. If it's the later, he is a demagogue pretending to be an expert. Take your pick. The New Mexican also noted another argument often trotted out in opposition to state medical marijuana laws:
Opponents of the bill said marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and patients in New Mexico could be subject to potential federal prosecution.
I really don’t understand why this argument should sway anyone. My response is, "Okay, let the DEA come in and start arresting patients, then." My second response is to wonder incredulously at the concern displayed by people who make this argument. Let me get this straight: They are so concerned that patients could be arrested under federal law that they would rather have them be arrested under state law? Gee, thanks for all that concern. If I sound just a bit grumpy, it's because I am. I spend my working life trying to end this stupid drug war. Every week, I write stories like the following about a Brazilian governor who wants to legalize drugs to fight crime, a high-level British panel calling for a complete rewriting of the drug laws, or a Scottish politician calling for the decriminalization of drugs. There are also similar stories from the US (although not this week)—a politician or an academic or an ex-cop calling for the end of the drug war. Yet although our anti-prohibitionist position is well justified both pragmatically (in terms of policy results) and philosophically (in terms of morality and ethics), not only do we seem not to be progressing toward our goal of a sensible and compassionate policy surrounding the use of drugs, we can't even get a goddamned measly little medical marijuana bill passed in a state where the public says it wants it, the governor says he wants it, and the state Senate voted for it. Sometimes I just want to chuck it all and move to my own sovereign island republic. But since there don’t seem to be too many of those available right now, I guess I'll keep slogging away. Today, however, I remind myself of Woody Harrelson's Woody the Bartender character in the 1980s sit-com "Cheers." At one point, when Woody is feeling betrayed by his rich girlfriend, Kelly, Sam accuses him of being bitter. "I'm not bitter, Sam," Woody replies. "I'm just consumed by a gnawing hate that's eating away at my gut until I can taste the bile in my mouth."
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Don't throw in the towel.

Don't throw in the towel. Keep fighting the war. You win some and you lose some in the long road to legalization but in the long term we will prevail.

You're doing great.

Keep it up!

Adam

Ass Holes

And the House Killed it end of story........... Why Does the Gov want this Bill So Bad It might be the 50,000.00 Dollar Campaign Contribution He got from Soros

borden's picture

if so

If so, good for Soros. Richardson does have a half decent record on drug issues -- not perfect, but half decent. If I remember correctly, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act was his bill in the Senate. And when one of our friends in New Mexico informed him a couple of years ago that students losing their federal financial aid because of drug convictions were also losing their state aid because of the way the administrative process worked, his reaction was let's fix it, and they did.

David Borden, Executive Director
StoptheDrugWar.org: the Drug Reform Coordination Network
Washington, DC
http://stopthedrugwar.org

Pelosi's support for medicinal marijuana

Will the House vote again on the Hinckley amendment this year? Is there a chance of passage this year? Sorry to see Phil feeling down, I really appreciate what full time advocates like him are doing.

medical marijuana

Thats great , I think we can tell our children the truth now just like the boogy man, don't we tell our kids about them also. I am the 1st to tell you the bad things about the pills that the doctor gives you to deal with pain are 10 times worse on your body and on your mind after 15 yrs. of taking them I ought to know. I am in my 50's and you would think at my age the doctors would at least let me have alittle more control over my medicines that go in my body, but I don't. even with the medical marijuana in New Mexico passed I still can't find a doctor that will work with me on this matter, I NEED A medical marijuana doctor as soon as possible!!!!! I deal with RSD and have had it for 15 yrs, all they want to give me are pills, pills, pills,pills,sincerely,JRNICKOLLS@MSN.COM please SOMEONE HELP ME

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