Drug War Chronicle

comprehensive coverage of the War on Drugs since 1997

Feature: Colombia Annouces Shift to Manual Eradication of Coca Crops

Six years and $5 billion in US assistance after the Colombian and US governments embarked on a program of mass aerial fumigation of Colombian coca fields in a bid to dry up the supply of cocaine, the Colombian government announced late last month that it will now accentuate manual eradication of the country's biggest cash crop.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/coca-seedlings.jpg
coca seedlings
While aerial fumigation was touted by drug warriors as a "silver bullet" that could put an end to the Colombian cocaine business, it hasn't worked out that way. According to official US figures, the amount of land devoted to coca production in Colombia has decreased only slightly since 2001, when major spraying began. That year, some 420,000 acres were planted with coca; in 2006, the number was 375,000 acres.

In addition to not reducing coca cultivation, aerial eradication has led to friction with neighbors, particularly Ecuador, which is concerned about drift-over. It has also excited intense opposition from Colombian peasants and their supporters, who charge that glyphosate, the pesticide used in the spraying, has harmed the environment, livestock, and people.

Now, with the Republican grip on power in Washington slipping and Democrats in control of the House and Senate, the Congress is showing signs it wants to back away from aerial eradication. Colombian President Alvaro Uribe is not waiting.

''Instead of uniting Colombians around the idea of eradicating drugs, [aerial spraying] causes complaints and provokes reactions against eradication,'' Uribe said in a July 20 speech in which he announced the shift. Spraying would remain only a ''marginal'' part of the counter-drug strategy, he said.

''It's an evolution of the policy... We are going to give more importance to the manual eradication than to aerial fumigation,'' Defense Minister Juan Manuel Santos confirmed last week to reporters in Washington, where he was discussing the new plans with US policymakers and lobbying Congress to allow more flexibility in the use of US counter-drug aid. ''Manual eradication can be more effective and, at times, cheaper,'' Santos added.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/eradication.jpg
aerial eradication operation
The policy shift was cheered by Colombia's most important newspaper, El Tiempo, in an editorial last week. "Announcing a reduction in aerial spraying and reinforcing manual eradication is the first step for Colombia to formulate an anti-narcotics strategy that answers to more than just 'recommendations' from Washington,'' the editorial said.

The announced shift is the result of both Colombian unhappiness with the results of spraying and the new balance of power in Washington, where congressional Democrats are much more reluctant to provide a blank check to the Bush administration on Colombia, American analysts told Drug War Chronicle.

In Congress, Democrats are proposing deep cuts in military assistance to Colombia and attempting to shift priorities from security to economic development. One House bill would do just that. Meanwhile, the Senate version of the Foreign Appropriations bill earmarks $10 million of the military aid for providing security for manual eradication and it would restrict aerial fumigation to specific areas where the State Department has certified that manual eradication cannot be done.

"One reason for drawing it down is there will be less money for it coming out of Congress, but even the hard-line Colombians were never that thrilled with fumigation," said Adam Isaacson of the Center for International Policy, which monitors Plan Colombia spending. "The Colombian military doesn't like it because it doesn't help them win hearts and minds. Uribe is saying that they are trying to increase the government presence in those areas, and fumigation makes that harder to do, so they will try doing more manual eradication," he said.

While Colombian disappointment with the results of spraying is a factor, it is the new era in Washington that is making the difference, Isaacson suggested. "The change in Congress has been the deciding factor," he said. "Year after year, we've seen these disastrously disappointing numbers for eradication, and the Colombians had to swallow it because every voice in power in Washington said they had to do it. Now, the Colombians have a chance to say what they really think about that policy."

"The Colombians are doing this in part because aerial fumigation simply has not worked," said Annalise Romoser of the US Office on Colombia, a Washington, DC, nonprofit that consults for the State Department on Colombia issues. "Since 2000, when we first started the massive aerial fumigation campaign, there has been a massive increase in production," she said.

"The Colombians are also responding to the message they are hearing from the US Congress," Romoser noted. "It is clear that both the House and the Senate are prepared to drastically slash funding, and the Colombian government is neither interested in nor capable of assuming the cost of aerial eradication without the US support they've been receiving."

But simply shifting from aerial eradication to manual eradication is not enough, said Romoser. "Manual eradication will only be successful when carried out in consultation with affected communities. We need consultation, not forced eradication. The communities I work with in the south are opposed to forced eradication. If they do that without social and economic development programs in place before it begins, it can end up being very divisive."

Eradication without development is a recipe for instability, agreed Isaacson. He pointed the experience of Bolivia a decade ago, when the government of Hugo Banzer unveiled Plan Dignidad and embarked on a campaign of forced eradication without consultation. The resulting chaos in the coca fields led to years of political instability.

"When Plan Dignidad hit, the coca growers went crazy," he recalled. "Road blockades, demonstrations, and the next thing you know, the head of the Chapare coca growers union is the president of Bolivia."

That's an unlikely outcome in Colombia, where coca growers have neither the relative numbers nor the institutional strength of their counterparts in Bolivia. But with the Colombian government ready to switch from aerial spraying to the "kinder, gentler" manual eradication of crops, the potential for more social conflict remains high, especially if eradication is not part of an integrated, holistic economic and social development program. So far, neither the US nor the Colombian governments have shown much appetite for that.

Feature: Snitching in the Spotlight -- House Committee Holds Hearing on Informant Abuses

The House Judiciary Committee heard police and legal experts say there needs to be more oversight and tighter standards on the use of confidential informants in law enforcement at a July 19 hearing. The hearing was called by committee chair Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) to look into ways to avoid abuses such as those that led to the shooting death of 92-year-old Atlanta resident Kathryn Johnston last December.

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/files/kathrynjohnston.jpg
Kathryn Johnston
Johnston was killed after opening fire on undercover Atlanta narcotics officers who were breaking down her door to serve a "no-knock" search warrant for cocaine. Those officers had obtained the warrant from an Atlanta magistrate by falsely telling him that a confidential informant had made drug buys at Johnston's location. Later that same day, those officers attempted to get that informant to lie and back them up, but the informant instead went to federal authorities. Two officers involved have since pleaded guilty to manslaughter, while a third awaits trial on false imprisonment charges.

While it was the Johnston killing that led directly to last month's hearing, concern over the widespread use of informants, or snitches, has been mounting for years, especially in regard to drug law enforcement. Hostility toward law enforcement either threatening low-level offenders to intimidate them into informing on others ("Do you want to be gang-raped for 30 years in prison instead?") or cultivating mercenary informers who infiltrate communities and set up drug deals for monetary gain has been simmering in poor and minority communities for years.

The "Stop Snitching" movement, much maligned by law enforcement officials as undermining the rule of law, is, at least in part, a direct consequence of the drug war's reliance on confidential informants. Especially in black communities, which have been hard hit the drug war, anger over drug war tactics, including the use of informants, is palpable.

Now, with Democrats once again in control of Congress, Congress is ready to listen -- and possibly to act. Rep. Conyers said at the hearing and in meetings with American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Drug Law Reform Project and Drug Policy Alliance staffers that is he preparing legislation to attempt to rein in the out of control use of informants. The use of informants is "totally out of control," said Conyers. "It's every law enforcement agency for itself. This is corrupting the entire criminal justice process," he warned.

"We've got a serious problem here that goes beyond coughing up cases where snitches were helpful," Conyers continued. "The whole criminal justice system is being intimidated by the way this thing is being run and in many cases, especially at the local level, mishandled... A lot of people have died because of misinformation, starting with Kathryn Johnston in Atlanta. Getting the wrong house, they cost the 92-year old woman her life. But then law enforcement tried to intimidate the confidential informant to clean the mess up. Then you get law enforcement involved in perpetrating the cover up of what is clearly criminal activity. So this is not a small deal that brings us here today and we are going to do something about it."

There will be more hearings to come, Conyers promised. "This is the first time that we have gotten into this matter in more than a dozen years... But this is only the tip of the iceberg. We've got to hold the most thorough hearings in recent American history on the whole question of the criminal justice system, which goes way beyond informants. It's been picked up and articulated by many of the witnesses, that we are talking about the culture of the law enforcement system and how it's got to be changed. One hearing starts us off, and I'm very proud of what we have accomplished here today."

At the hearing, law enforcement personnel and legal scholars alike acknowledged that the informant system is loosely supervised and can lead to corner-cutting and abuses by police. "The government's use of criminal informants is largely secretive, unregulated and unaccountable," Alexandra Natapoff, a Loyola Law School professor who studies the issue, told the panel.

The massive reliance on informants makes communities not safer but more dangerous, said Natapoff. "What does this mean for law abiding residents like Mrs. Johnston?" she asked. "It means they must live in close proximity to criminal offenders looking for a way to work off their liability. Indeed, it made Kathryn Johnston's home a target for a drug dealer.It also means that police in these neighborhoods tolerate petty drug offenses in exchange for information, and so addicts and low level dealers can often remain on the street. It also makes law enforcement less rigorous: police who rely heavily on informants are more likely to act on an uncorroborated tip from a suspected drug dealer. In other words, a neighborhood with many criminal informants in it is a more dangerous and insecure place to live."

The massive reliance on informants also corrodes police-community relations, Natapoff said. "This question about the use of confidential informants goes to the heart of the problem of police-community relations," she told the panel. "It's an historical problem in this country, it's not reducible to the problem of informing or snitching or stop snitching, but I would submit that the 20-year policy on the part of state, local and federal government of using confidential informants and sending criminals back into the community with some form of impunity and lenience, and turning a blind eye to their bad behavior, has increased the distrust between police and community."

The Rev. Markel Hutchins, pastor of the Philadelphia Baptist Church in Atlanta and a spokesman for the Johnston family, also addressed the hearing. "There is a problem with the culture of policing in America," Hutchins said. "And because of that culture, far too often police officers feel that they can do what they want to under the cover of law. This committee has a unique opportunity to help protect even the officers themselves that engage in this kind of behavior by insolating them from the capacity or the potential they have to engage in this kind of corrupt behavior."

There must be more accountability in the courts, said Hutchins. "I will submit to this committee that if the fabricated confidential informant that was mentioned and feloniously used in the Kathryn Johnston case had been required to appear before a judge, Ms. Johnston would still be alive today... It was just too easy for these police officers to go in front of a judge and to lie. They've engaged in this kind of practice for years and it's been happening all over the country... If police had done due diligence, they would have known that a 92-year old woman lived there in the home by herself. There was no corroboration. There was not any appropriate investigative work done. But I think that probably the most poignant thing that happened to Ms. Johnston is had she not been 92-years old, and had she been my age, 29-30 year old, and a young black man, we might not be having this hearing right now," Hutchins said.

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/files/conyers-perry-fund.jpg
John Conyers, addressing DRCNet's March 2005 Perry Fund scholarship fundraiser
Even National Narcotic Officers' Association Coalition President Ronald Brooks agreed that reforms are necessary. "We need to take an absolute hard line posture when law enforcement breaks the rules, like in any other profession," he told the committee. "The conduct at first blush committed in Atlanta, and in Tulia, and in Dallas, and in a host of other places was criminal conduct by law enforcement officers and that conduct should be punished vigorously... We need to instill an ethical culture that says that the ends never justify the means... We only have one opportunity to have credibility in our courts and in our communities," Brooks said.

"It was a really good hearing," said Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance. "Conyers said he wants to introduce omnibus legislation overhauling the use of confidential informants. Right now, we and the ACLU Drug Policy Law Project are working with his office to come up with specific language," Piper said. "The question now is what the bill is going to look like. If anyone has suggestions, contact us or Conyers' office," he said.

"The hearing was amazing!" said Ana del Llano, informant campaign coordinator for the ACLU Drug Law Reform Project. "We are hoping that when Congress comes back from recess in September, we will be able to have a bill filed."

Advocates are focusing on a number of reforms surrounding the use of informants:

  • guidelines on the use and regulation of informants' corroboration;
  • reliability hearings, pre-warrant and pre-sentencing;
  • performance measures;
  • data collection;
  • requiring federal agents to notify state and local law enforcement when they have evidence that their informant committed a violent felony, or evidence that an accused person is innocent;
  • placing conditions on federal funding that will require state and local police to follow the provisions of this legislation.

It's about time -- both for hearings and for the passage of legislation to rein in the snitches, said Nora Callahan, director of the November Coalition, a drug reform group that concentrates on federal drug war prisoners. "The informant system is a secret, hidden policing system," she said. "When queried, most police departments, federal, state and local, don't have any written policy or procedures with regard to their use of informants. How dependent is law enforcement on a system of snitches? Police departments can't give us data on snitches. Researchers have discovered that about 90% of search warrants are granted by judges who see nothing more than an officer's statement from a confidential informant. They bust down doors on words of people trading information for police favors."

The system is truly pernicious, Callahan argued. "Some psychologists teach police departments how to turn people into cooperators, also called informers or snitches. It's time, the threat of long years in prison, that reduces people to rolling over on their mothers, or their best friends," she said.

Now, at long last, Congress may intervene. But last month's hearing was only the beginning.

Watch the entire hearing online and read official written testimony here.

Weekly: This Week in History

Posted in:

August 8, 1988: The domestic marijuana seizure record is set (still in effect today) -- 389,113 pounds in Miami, Florida.

August 6, 1990: Robert C. Bonner is sworn in as administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Bonner had been a federal judge in Los Angeles. Before he became a judge, Bonner served as a US attorney from 1984 to 1989.

August 9, 1990: Two hundred National Guardsmen and Bureau of Land Management rangers conduct a marijuana raid dubbed Operation Green Sweep on a federal conservation area in California known as King Ridge. Local residents file a $100 million lawsuit, claiming that Federal agents illegally invaded their property, wrongfully arrested them, and harassed them with their low-flying helicopters and loaded guns.

August 4, 1996: In the midst of an election season that included California's medical marijuana initiative, Prop. 215, state narcotics agents, at the direction of California Attorney General Dan Lungren, raid the Cannabis Buyers' Club of San Francisco.

August 7, 1997: The New England Journal of Medicine opines, "Virtually no one thinks it is reasonable to initiate criminal prosecution of patients with cancer or AIDS who use marijuana on the advice of their physicians to help them through conventional medical treatment for their disease."

August 8, 1999: A CNN story entitled "Teen critics pan national anti-drug ads" reports that high school students are remaining skeptical that the government's anti-drug television ads are much of a deterrent as they believe the constant warnings about the dangers of drug use have dulled the message.

August 7, 2000: The Houston Chronicle runs a front page story about the corruption of paid informants in drug cases.

August 3, 2001: The Miami Herald reports that the CIA paid the Peruvian intelligence organization run by fallen spymaster Vladimiro Montesinos $1 million a year for 10 years to fight drug trafficking, despite evidence that Montesinos was also in business with Colombian narcotraffickers.

August 8, 2001: During his third term in Congress, Asa Hutchinson is appointed by President Bush as Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

August 3, 2004: Sixty percent of Detroit's residents vote in favor of Proposition M ("The Detroit Medical Marijuana Act") which amends the Detroit city criminal code so that local criminal penalties no longer apply to any individual "possessing or using marijuana under the direction... of a physician or other licensed health professional."

August 5, 2004: In a Seattle Post-Intelligencer op-ed entitled "War on Drugs Escalates to War on Families," Walter Cronkite calls the war on drugs "disastrous" and a "failure," and provides a plethora of reasons why it should end immediately.

August 6, 2004: The Ninth Circuit orders the release, pending appeal, of Bryan Epis, who had been convicted of conspiracy to grow 1,000 marijuana plants in a federal trial in which the jury was not allowed to hear that he was a medical marijuana activist.

Southwest Asia: State Department Says US Afghanistan Drug Policy Will Shift, But Not Much

In a meeting last week with "a select group of Washington analysts," Thomas Schweich, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, conceded that US efforts to destroy the Afghan opium industry had achieved only "mixed results" and said that the Bush administration would adjust its policies to be more effective. But Schweich's remarks suggested that any changes would be at the margins.

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/afghan-farmers.jpg
Chronicle editor Phil Smith interviewed former opium-growing Afghan farmers outside Jalalabad in fall 2005
Afghanistan last year produced more than 90% of the world's opium, and increased production by 49% to more than 6,700 metric tons. This year's crop is expected to be even larger. Profits from the opium trade are widely believed to fund the resurgent Taliban insurgency, as well as line the pockets of warlords, governors, and government officials. But the crop is also a mainstay of the nation's economy and a lifeline to hundreds of thousands of Afghanistan's farmers struggling to feed their families.

In remarks reported by EurasiaNet, a news and information service for Central Asia and the Caucausus operated by the Open Society Institute, Schweich said that it would take at least five years to bring Afghan opium production "under control," but that completely eliminating it would be "impossible." Alternative crops for opium farmers had not been found and proposals to legalize production for the medicinal market were "impractical," he said.

Eradication had been a disappointment, Schweich said, a not surprising admission given large annual increases in the poppy crop in recent years. Schweich implicitly criticized the Afghan government for its limited success in eradication, saying manual and mechanical eradication techniques can at best eliminate 10% of the crop, while Washington wants to see that figure climb to 25%. Washington is itching to use aerial eradication against the poppy crop, but the Karzai government has so far demurred.

Still, he said, the administration's five-point Afghan anti-drug plan was fundamentally correct:

  1. waging an effective public information campaign;
  2. providing opium farmers with alternative and legal opportunities for earning their livelihood;
  3. enhancing the capacity of Afghan law enforcement agencies to prosecute major narco-traffickers through their imprisonment or extradition;
  4. eradicating opium crops; and
  5. interdicting the flow of narcotics within and beyond Afghanistan.

The program is heavy on law enforcement and eradication, an approach that has so far yielded meager results. Since Schweich has already admitted that there are no good alternative crops, it appears US opium policy in Afghanistan will continue to rely on propaganda, some big sticks, and very few carrots.

Marijuana: Yesterday Marked 70 Years of Federal Pot Prohibition

It was 70 years ago yesterday that Congress passed the first federal law outlawing marijuana. The law, the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, effectively banned the weed by establishing onerous taxes on buyers, sellers, producers, and prescribers and creating draconian penalties for noncompliance.

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/files/devilsharvest.jpg
1930's ''Reefer Madness''-style film poster
The subsequent seven-decades of marijuana prohibition have seen a vast increase in the drug's popularity and acceptance, even as it remains a lightning rod for conservative culture warriors determined to smite the hippies. Around 100 million or more adult Americans have smoked marijuana at least once, and some 16 to 20 million are regular consumers today.

According to researcher Jon Gettman, marijuana is now the nation's largest cash crop, accounting for more agricultural income than wheat, corn, and soybeans combined. It is also grist for the law enforcement mill, with some 800,000 marijuana arrests in 2005, nearly 90% of them for simple possession.

While about a dozen states have decriminalized marijuana possession, only one of them, Nevada, has done so in recent years. The others came in a wave of reform in the 1970s. Similarly, a dozen states have legalized the medicinal use of marijuana, but those measures are ignored by federal drug enforcers.

"It's hard to think of a more spectacularly bad, long-term policy failure than our government's 70-year war on marijuana users," said Rob Kampia, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project. "Since the federal government banned marijuana in 1937, it's gone from being an obscure plant that few Americans had even heard of to the number-one cash crop in the United States. It's time to steer a new course and regulate marijuana like we do alcohol."

This week, we commemorate the beginning of federal marijuana prohibition. We would much rather be writing its obituary.

For a good laugh -- or cry -- read Prof. Charles Whitebread's recounting of the history of the marijuana laws, describing the incredibly shoddy way the debate on the issue was handled.

Search and Seizure: California Supreme Court Just Says No to Seizures of Drug Buyers' Cars

In a closely divided 4-3 opinion, the California Supreme Court has ruled that local governments cannot seize the vehicles of people arrested on suspicion of buying drugs or using prostitutes, the two most common offenses targeted by local crime-fighting forfeiture ordinances in a number of California cities. The ordinances aim to reduce drug selling and street prostitution by seizing the cars of customers and thus deterring future customers.

The ruling came in O'Connell v. City of Stockton, where a local woman, Kelly O'Connell, challenged the city's "Seizure and Forfeiture of Nuisance Vehicles" ordinance. In a legal argument that was more about state versus municipal power than drug offenses or selling sex, the court held that only the state can set punishments for offenses under the state criminal code -- not municipalities.

Nor, the court held, can cities mete out punishments for state law violations that are harsher than the state laws themselves. In some California cases, drivers seeking to buy marijuana -- small-time pot possession is a $100 ticket in California -- have had their vehicles seized.

The punishment of drug and prostitution offenses "are matters of statewide concern that our Legislature has comprehensively addressed... leaving no room for further regulations at the local level," the court ruled.

While it was Stockton's ordinance that was challenged, the court's decision invalidates similar ordinances that began with Oakland, the first California city to adopt forfeiture laws in 1998. Since then, Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento, San Bernardino, Riverside, Inglewood and Ontario, among others, have enacted similar ordinances.

After the decision was announced, attorney Mark Clausen, who represented O'Connell, told the Los Angeles Times that "several thousand" vehicles had been seized throughout the state, with most drivers getting their cars back after paying "impound fees" of up to $2,000.

"These ordinances were just a public relations stunt," Clausen said.

But prosecutors and law enforcement officials told the Times seizing vehicles was a valuable law enforcement tactic. "Obviously, this is a very valuable tool for us," said Los Angeles Police Department Cmdr. Harlan Ward. "It allows us to take care of community issues. It's a tool we use to work on the quality-of-life issues that affect neighborhoods."

The effect of the decision will be far-reaching, said John Lovell, counsel for the California Police Chiefs Association. "Forfeiture no longer appears to be an option," he said.

Search and Seizure: Arizona Supreme Court Limits Vehicle Searches

The Arizona Supreme Court ruled late last month that police cannot routinely search the vehicles of people they arrest. In a 3-2 decision in State v. Gant, the court held that the warrantless search of Rodney Gant's vehicle after he was arrested, handcuffed, and sitting in the back seat of a police car went beyond an allowable search incident to arrest and was "not justifiable."

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/car-search.jpg
police searching accused drug traffickers' car
Gant, from Tucson, was convicted on drug charges after police waiting for him as part of a drug investigation arrested him on a warrant for driving on a suspended license when he drove up to a targeted address. Police knew he had the pre-existing warrant because they had checked up on him during an earlier encounter at the same address. When Gant drove up and got out of his car, police called him over and arrested and handcuffed him. They then searched the vehicle and found the drugs that led to his conviction. The court overturned the conviction, calling the search a violation of the Fourth Amendment.

The legal argument centered around whether the facts in this case were consistent with a search incident to arrest. US courts have recognized searches incident to arrest as one of the few areas where the Fourth Amendment requirement of probable cause or a search warrant not does apply, citing officer safety and the need to preserve evidence.

The Arizona Supreme Court held that the search of Gant's vehicle after he was already under arrest and handcuffed for a traffic warrant was not a search incident to arrest. "When the justifications [for a search incident to arrest] no longer exist because the scene is secure and the arrestee is handcuffed, secured in the back of a patrol car, and under the supervision of an officer, the warrantless search of the arrestee's car cannot be justified as necessary to protect the officers at the scene or prevent the destruction of evidence," wrote Justice Rebecca Berch for the majority.

Arizona law enforcement was not happy about the ruling, and some agencies suggested they would find ways to skirt it. Police departments across the state, working with the Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police and the Arizona Law Enforcement Legal Advisors' Association, filed briefs urging the court to uphold the conviction and hinting they would adopt different arrest procedures -- perhaps not handcuffing suspects until after a vehicle search -- to be able to continue the practice.

Justice Berch addressed that implied threat in her opinion. "We presume that police officers will exercise proper judgment in their contacts with arrestees and will not engage in conduct which creates unnecessary risks to their safety or public safety in order to circumvent the Fourth Amendment's warrant requirements," she wrote.

Law Enforcement: FBI Lowers Bar on Past Marijuana Use by Would-Be Agents

In the midst of a campaign to hire hundreds of new agents, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has loosened its policies on past drug use by potential applicants. The old policy, in effect since 1994, disqualified applicants who had smoked marijuana more than 15 times or ever used any illegal drug.

Under the new policy, unannounced but in effect since January, applicants who have not used marijuana for the past three years or for more than just "experimentation" will not be barred. Applicants who have not used any other illegal drug for at least 10 years will not be disqualified, either.

FBI Deputy Director Jeff Berkin told USA Today that the previous system had become "arbitrary" and it was difficult for applicants to pass polygraph tests about drug use because they could not remember how many times they had smoked pot.

"It encourages honesty and allows us to look at the whole person," Berkin said as his agency sought to increase the number of applicants for the 221 agent positions and 121 intelligence analyst positions it has open.

The FBI is only the latest law enforcement agency to amend its policies on past marijuana use. Increasing numbers of departments are reporting problems with applicants being excluded over past pot-smoking, and increasingly, departments are loosening their standards. Even the drug czar's office understands.

"Increasingly, the goal for the screening of security clearance applicants is whether you are a current drug user, rather than whether you used in the past," said Tom Riley, a spokesman for the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. "It's not whether you have smoked pot four times or 16 times 20 years ago. It's about whether you smoked last week and lied about it."

Law Enforcement: This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

This week we have a pair from the US-Mexico border, where temptation is always close at hand, and a pair from Florida, where corruption seems to thrive in the steamy atmosphere. Let's get to it:

In El Paso, a Customs and Border Patrol agent was arrested July 27 for allegedly letting more than a ton of marijuana into the country. CBP Officer Margarita Crispin is charged with one count of conspiracy to import a controlled substance. According to the indictment, she conspired with others from 2003 to this year to let truck loads get by border checkpoints. She was jailed awaiting a bond hearing at last report.

In Miami Beach, a city parking enforcement officer was arrested last weekend on drug sales charges. Enforcement Officer Elio Espinosa allegedly sold three bags of drugs to an informant. He is charged with possession of cocaine with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a school.

In Tucson, three former National Guardsmen were sentenced to prison last week for conspiring to run drugs for traffickers. They are only the latest of the more than three dozen current and former police and military personnel ensnared in Operation Lively Green, an FBI sting where agents posed as traffickers and enlisted the help of law enforcement and military personnel to move drug shipments. Demian Castillo, a former recruiter for the Tucson Army National Guard, got two years for accepting $14,000 to run two drug loads in 2002. Former Guard member Sheldon Anderson got 10 months for helping out on a single drug run. Former Guardsman Mario Quintana got two years for helping out on two loads. All three pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bribery of a public official.

In Hollywood, Florida, a fifth Hollywood police officer has now pleaded guilty in an FBI sting operation. Former Hollywood Police Lt. Charles Roberts pleaded guilty to one count of making a false statement when he told investigators he knew nothing about an undercover FBI sting. The sting, known as Operation Tarnished Badge, targeted Hollywood police officers who were agreeable to transporting heroin for people they believed to be drug dealers but who were actually FBI agents. It was shut down early after word of its existence leaked out. Three officers have been sentenced to prison for their roles in drug transportation conspiracies, and a fourth awaits sentencing this month. Roberts faces up to five years in prison when he is sentenced in October.

Weekly: Blogging @ the Speakeasy

Along with our weekly in-depth Chronicle reporting, DRCNet has since late summer also been providing daily content in the way of blogging in the Stop the Drug War Speakeasy, as well as Latest News links (upper right-hand corner of most web pages), event listings (lower right-hand corner) and other info. Check out DRCNet every day to stay on top of the drug reform game!

https://stopthedrugwar.org/files/dc-beer-raid-small.jpg
prohibition-era beer raid, Washington, DC (Library of Congress)

The Reader blogs have really picked up this week, with posts by medical marijuana patients, people who are facing prosecution or have friends who are, readers on what their Reps who voted against medical marijuana last week told them, observations on Congressional hearings via C-Span, more.

From the staff this week:

Scott Morgan brings us: "DC Drug Policy Softball Team Ranked #1," "New Study: Marijuana Does Not Cause Psychosis, Lung Damage, or Skin Cancer" "Opposition to Medical Marijuana is a Conspiracy to Prevent Broader Legalization," "Six Months Since Police Shot an Innocent 80-Year-Old Man, and Still No Explanation," "San Francisco Orders Medical Marijuana Dispensaries to Sell Fatter Bags" and "The People Support Medical Marijuana, Even If Congress Does Not."

David Borden contributes: "Important Exchange Re: Clinton & Obama on Needle Exchange," "Why did alcohol prohibition end?," "Republican and Democratic Senators Query Gonzales on Crack Sentencing Views," "Five Architects of the Drug War -- and the Result of Their Work," "New Resource on Judges' Views on Federal Sentencing -- Basically, They Hate It," "Some Good Forfeiture News," "Another Pain Doctor on the Ropes," "Another Letter from a Medical Marijuana Patient ...and Another Letter from a Medical Marijuana Patient," "I'm as angry as I've been in a long time over this one..."

Rabble-rouser Phil Smith pushes the envelope with "Taking it to the Drug Warriors -- Is It Time for Direct Action?" and reports "My Representative Explains Why She Voted Against Hinchey-Rohrabacher."

David Guard has been busy too, posting a plethora of press releases, action alerts, job listings and other interesting items reposted from many allied organizations around the world in our "In the Trenches" activist feed.

Join our Reader Blogs here.

Thanks for reading, and writing...

Europa: O gabinete ministerial britânico está cheio de ex-usuários de maconha

Na semana em que o novo primeiro-ministro britânico, Gordon Brown, anunciou que o governo dele repensará reclassificar a maconha de uma droga de Classe C (menos séria) para uma de Classe B (mais séria), nove ministros do gabinete dele admitiram fumar maconha. Os pronunciamentos provavelmente tanto constrangeram o governo Brown quanto o deixaram vulnerável a acusações de hipocrisia se tomar providências para tornar o consumo, o porte e a venda de maconha sujeitas a penas mais duras.

A maconha foi rebaixada para a Classe C em janeiro de 2004 durante o governo de Tony Blair, mas a medida tem sido polêmica desde o princípio e é ainda mais hoje, já que grande parte da mídia e da classe política britânicas parece paralisada pela psicose canábica.

O governo Brown pediu ao Conselho Acessório sobre o Uso Indevido de Drogas (ACMD, sigla em inglês) que investigue se a maconha é bem mais forte agora do que antes e se as relações entre ela e a doença mental são tão fortes que ela deveria ser devolvida à Classe B. Há menos de dois anos, o ACMD averiguou a mesma questão e decidiu que a maconha deveria permanecer onde está.

A cascata de admissões de fumo de droga começou em meados da semana passada, quando a ministra do Interior, Jacqui Smith, cuja pasta está encarregada da reclassificação, admitiu que ela fumara maconha quando era estudante na Universidade de Oxford nos anos 1980.

"Eu infringi a lei sim... estava errada... as drogas são erradas", disse ela no que agora é o mea culpa obrigatório e a humilhação ritual que devem acompanhar qualquer admissão de consumo de drogas de parte de políticos preeminentes. Ela não disse se achava que teria sido melhor caso fosse punida com as penas mais rigorosas que os usuários de maconha podem pegar de novo se a droga for reclassificada.

Smith foi apenas a primeira de sete ministros atuais a admitirem consumo de maconha no passado na semana passada. Os outros foram o ministro da Fazenda; Alistair Darling; a ministra dos Transportes, Ruth Kelly; o ministro da Economia, John Hutton; o ministro do Tesouro, Andy Burnham; o ministro da Educação, John Denham e a vice-presidenta do Trabalho, Harriet Harman. As duas outras ministras do gabinete, a ministra de Habitação, Yvette Coper, e a ministra de Comunidades, Hazel Blears, haviam admitido anteriormente fumar maconha no passado.

Harman, a vice-presidenta do Trabalho, se comportou como os colegas ministros fumantes de maconha dela, todos os quais disseram que o consumo deles foi experimental e que aconteceu há muito tempo. Quando indagada se também fumara, ela respondeu: "Sim, quando estava na universidade, eu fumei cânabis uma ou duas vezes". Mas, desde então, ela se endireitou, disse: "Me entreguei a uma taça de vinho de quando em vez, mas não à cânabis".

Os conservadores oposicionistas deixaram passar a chance de atacar o governo trabalhista pelo assunto, provavelmente porque muitos membros do governo-sombra conservador também admitiram consumir maconha no passado. O atual líder conservador, David Cameron, se recusou várias vezes a dizer se consumiu drogas antes de virar uma pessoa pública, apesar dos rumores persistentes de ter feito mais do que fumar um pouquinho de maconha no passado.

Sudeste asiático: Singapura dá opção de tratamento a usuários de maconha e cocaína

A partir de 1º de agosto, os usuários de maconha e de cocaína pegos em Singapura terão que passar por tratamento obrigatório em Centros de Reabilitação Química, anunciou na quarta-feira a Agência Central de Entorpecentes. Isso significa que os cheiradores de cocaína e os fumantes de maconha receberão a mesma chance na "reabilitação" que os demais usuários de drogas na cidade-estado do sudeste asiático.

http://stopthedrugwar.com/files/singaporecnb.jpg
logotipo da Agência Central de Entorpecentes de Singapura
Mas, é melhor que se emendem da primeira vez. As pessoas que passarem por tratamento e tiverem uma recaída e forem presas de novo pegarão uma sentença mínima obrigatória de cinco anos de prisão e três vergastadas.

As pessoas que passarem pela "reabilitação" e sofrerem recaídas pegarão uma sentença mínima obrigatória de sete anos e também entre seis e 12 vergastadas.

Singapura tem algumas das leis mais duras do mundo contra o tráfico de drogas e a sua Lei de Uso Indevido de Drogas [Misuse of Drugs Act] inclui a pena de morte para alguns crimes de drogas, inclusive o tráfico de quantidade superior a 660 gramas de maconha. Agora, terá algumas das leis mais severas de repressão à maconha do mundo voltadas contra os usuários.

Austrália: Partido Verde nacional abandona postura de legalização das drogas

O Partido Verde australiano se retratou de novo de posturas adotadas no início desta década que pediam a distribuição regularizada de maconha e demais "drogas sociais", como o êxtase. Pela primeira vez, o partido tornou a sua oposição à legalização das drogas parte do seu programa de políticas de drogas.

Só para deixar claríssima a retirada do partido, a oposição à legalização é o primeiro artigo na plataforma verde de políticas de drogas. "Os verdes australianos não apóiam a legalização das drogas atualmente ilegais", declara o ponto sem rodeios.

A Plataforma Verde antes das eleições nacionais de 2004 era bem diferente. Pedia a "oferta controlada de cânabis nos pontos de venda adequados" e "pesquisas das opções para a oferta regularizada de drogas sociais como o êxtase em ambientes fiscalizados". Mas, sob a direção do atual líder partidário, o senador Bob Brown, em janeiro de 2006 os verdes tiraram do programa qualquer referência à maconha ou à legalização de outras drogas leves, pedindo, em troca, a formação de um instituto nacional de políticas de drogas.

A retirada acontece na disputa pelas eleições parlamentares neste ano e no contexto de uma reação política às reformas limitadas nas políticas de drogas adotadas por vários estados, campanhas hiperbólicas de intimidação sobre a potência da maconha e os seus vínculos com a doença mental e os altos índices de consumo de metanfetamina e êxtase. Em particular, os verdes foram atacados duramente como "legalizadores das drogas" em 2004 pelos liberais no governo e também por partidos conservadores como o Family First e podem estar esperando parecer mais aceitáveis para o Partido Trabalhista da oposição.

O senador Brown disse o mesmo ao anunciar a mudança de políticas no sábado. "Não deixa os verdes vulneráveis a tergiversações do Family First e da Pauline Hanson", disse. "Mantém a nossa preocupação com que, embora os traficantes de drogas devam ser tratados segundo o código penal, as vítimas devam ser ajudadas".

Brown disse que o partido confiara nos melhores conselhos de especialistas em drogas para a sua mudança de políticas. "Aperfeiçoou as nossas políticas e as manteve a par da melhor prática do mundo", disse.

Atualmente, os verdes detêm quatro cadeiras no Senado (de 76), obtidas com 7,7% dos votos, o que, segundo o sistema de representação proporcional da Austrália, lhes permite um espaço na mesa. Apesar de os verdes capturarem 7,2% dos votos para deputados, não conseguiram nenhuma cadeira. Estão competindo em todas as circunscrições eleitorais no país nas próximas eleições legislativas.

Contudo, embora os verdes tenham mudado claramente a ênfase pública de suas políticas de drogas - eles também pedem medidas duras contra os vendedores de drogas -, o grosso da plataforma verde de políticas de drogas é muito superior a qualquer coisa adotada pelos grandes partidos australianos ou pelos grandes partidos nos EUA, se é que se pode dizer assim. O segundo ponto na plataforma é um pedido de redução de danos, o quinto pede uma abordagem de saúde pública e o sexto diz que as pessoas não deveriam ser presas somente por consumo de drogas.

Europa: Polícia holandesa se queixa dos cultivos caseiros

A polícia holandesa está se queixando publicamente de que as políticas de maconha que fazem vista grossa para as pessoas que cultivam cinco plantas ou menos deveriam ser endurecidas e também aquelas que visam aos cultivadores comerciais. Embora cultivar plantas de maconha seja tecnicamente ilegal na Holanda, os promotores ignoram rotineiramente os cultivos de menos de cinco plantas, assim como ignoram o porte de até cinco gramas.

Mas, um porta-voz da polícia citado no jornal de Amsterdã, Volkskrant, acha que os cultivadores menores estão cultivando com fins lucrativos. Eles podem ganhar até $5,000 ao ano com cinco plantas, reclamou o detetive Ben Janssen.

Os cultivos comerciais também estão se safando fácil, disse Janssen. "No presente momento, eles pegam serviço comunitário de 60 a 80 horas. Deveria haver um sinal claro de que (a produção de maconha) é inaceitável", disse.

A polícia holandesa apreende cerca de 8.000 cultivos comerciais ao ano, de acordo com dados publicados no Telegraaf.

Os cultivadores comerciais de maconha abastecem a demanda dos famosos cafés canábicos da Holanda, mas o governo holandês se recusa a regularizar esse componente dos negócios domésticos de maconha por medo de transgredir as obrigações nos tratados internacionais. Os cultivadores e ativistas holandeses o chamam de "o problema da porta dos fundos", já que a maconha vendida nos cafés pode sair pela porta principal com o consentimento das autoridades, mas a maconha que está sendo fornecida deve entrar pela porta de trás, deixando os cultivadores e os cafés presos em um mercado cinza.

Janssen também pediu medidas duras contra as lojas que vendem sementes, luzes, fertilizantes e demais equipamentos para o cultivo de maconha. "São a entrada para o cultivo organizado de maconha", disse.

Há poucos indícios que sugiram que uma ofensiva iminente contra os cultivadores caseiros de maconha, mas a denúncia pública da polícia é um sinal claro de que os negócios holandeses da maconha não podem baixar a guarda.

Semanal: Esta semana na história

02 de agosto de 1937: A Lei de Taxação da Maconha [Marijuana Tax Act] é aprovada pelo Congresso, promulgando a proibição da maconha no âmbito federal pela primeira vez. O comissário da Agência Federal de Entorpecentes, Harry Anslinger, diz aos congressistas nas audiências: "A maconha é uma droga viciante que produz insanidade, criminalidade e morte em seus usuários".

02 de agosto de 1977: Em um discurso ao Congresso, Jimmy Carter trata do mal causado pela proibição, dizendo: "As penas contra uma droga não deveriam ser mais prejudiciais para um indivíduo do que o consumo da própria droga. Em nenhuma parte isto está mais claro do que nas leis contra o porte de maconha para consumo pessoal. A Comissão Nacional sobre a Maconha... concluiu há cinco anos que a maconha deveria ser descriminalizada e acho que chegou a hora de implementarmos essas recomendações básicas".

29 de julho de 1995: Em uma entrevista concedida aos editores do Charlotte Observer, Pat Buchanan diz que é a favor de medidas que permitam que os médicos prescrevam maconha para o alívio de certas doenças. "Se um médico indicasse ao paciente dele que esta era a única maneira de aliviar certos sintomas dolorosos, assentiria com o juízo do médico", diz.

29 de julho de 1997: Um grande número de ajudantes do xerife de Los Ângeles irrompe na casa do autor e paciente de maconha medicinal, Peter McWilliams, e do famoso ativista pró-maconha medicinal, Todd McCormick, um usuário e cultivador de maconha medicinal que teve câncer dez vezes quando era criança e sofre de dores crônicas resultantes da fusão das vértebras no seu pescoço em uma cirurgia de infância. Enfim, McCormick cumpre uma sentença de cinco anos, enquanto que McWilliams morre engasgado no próprio vômito dele em 2000 após a negativa de acesso à maconha medicinal de parte de um juiz federal.

27 de julho de 2000: Referindo-se a uma das falas do secretário antidrogas Barry McCaffrey, o Salon.com publica "Combatendo a medicina 'Cheech e Chong'", um artigo que mostrava que toda a gênese da nova campanha midiática do governo, a motivação para conseguir o espaço publicitário doado da Partnership for a Drug-Free America e torná-la um gasto de bilhões de dólares em verbas do contribuinte, era uma resposta direta à aprovação de iniciativas de maconha medicinal na Califórnia e no Arizona em 1996.

31 de julho de 2000: No Canadá, o tribunal superior de Ontário decide por unanimidade (3-0) que a lei canadense que torna o porte de maconha um crime é inconstitucional porque não leva em conta as necessidades dos pacientes canadenses de maconha medicinal. Os juízes permitem que a lei atual continue em vigor durante outros 12 meses, para permitir que o Parlamento a reescreva, mas diz que se o governo federal canadense não instaurar um programa de distribuição de maconha medicinal por volta de 31 de julho de 2001, todas as leis sobre a maconha no Canadá serão derrogadas.

1º de agosto de 2000: A primeira Convenção Sombra se reúne na Filadélfia, PA, com a guerra às drogas sendo um dos três principais temas do encontro.

27 de julho de 2002: A Associated Press informa que um diretor regional da principal agência de inteligência do México foi morto na cidade fronteiriça de Tijuana, a 11ª pessoa morta durante a semana anterior no que as autoridades chamam de uma escalada da guerra às drogas.

30 de julho de 2002: A ABC transmite o informe especial de John Stossel, "War on Drugs, A War on Ourselves" [Guerra contra as drogas, uma guerra contra nós mesmos], que aponta criticamente a futilidade da abordagem atual do governo às políticas de fiscalização das drogas.

28 de julho de 2003: James Geddes, condenado inicialmente a 150 anos por porte de uma pequena quantidade de maconha e de apetrechos para consumo e por cultivar cinco plantas de maconha, é solto. Geddes dissera: "Como é que o presidente, a mulher dele, o vice-presidente e a mulher dele, o prefeito de Washington, DC, até o presidente da Câmara podem fazer essas coisas e eu devo pagar caro?"

31 de julho de 2003: Karen P. Tandy é confirmada por unanimidade no Senado dos EUA como administradora da Administração de Repressão às Drogas. Tandy estava trabalhando no Ministério da Justiça (DOJ, sigla em inglês) como subprocuradora-geral e diretora da unidade de combate ao crime organizado da Força-Tarefa Antidrogas. Antes, ela trabalhou no DOJ como chefa de litígio no Gabinete de Seqüestro de Bens e subchefa da unidade de entorpecentes e drogas perigosas, e ela processou casos de drogas, lavagem de dinheiro e confiscação quando foi subprocuradora federal no Distrito Oriental da Virgínia e no Distrito Ocidental de Washington.

1º de agosto de 2004: O Observer (RU) informa que os EUA culpam a "falta de urgência" da Grã-Bretanha pelo seu fracasso em deter o tráfico florescente de ópio no Afeganistão, expondo um cisma entre os aliados enquanto o país treme à beira da anarquia.

Retorno: Você lê a Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas?

Você lê a Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas? Se sim, gostaríamos de ouvi-lo. A DRCNet precisa de duas coisas:

  1. Estamos entre doações ao boletim informativo e isso torna a nossa carência de doações mais premente. É grátis ler a Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas, mas não produzi-la! Clique aqui para fazer uma doação por cartão de crédito ou PayPal ou para imprimir um formulário a fim de mandá-lo por correio.

  2. Por favor, mande citações e informes sobre de que maneira você aplica o nosso fluxo de informação, para uso em futuras propostas de doação e cartas a financiadores ou possíveis financiadores. Você usa a DRCNet como fonte para falar em público? Para cartas ao editor? Ajuda a conversar com amigos ou sócios sobre a questão? Pesquisa? Para instrução própria? Você mudou de opinião sobre quaisquer aspectos das políticas de drogas desde que se inscreveu ou foi inspirado a se envolver na causa? Você reproduz ou republica partes dos nossos informativos em outras listas ou em outros informativos? Tem quaisquer críticas, reclamações ou sugestões? Queremos ouvi-las também. Por favor, mande a sua resposta - tudo bem se forem uma ou duas frases; seria ótimo ter mais também - mande um e-mail a borden@drcnet.org ou responda a um endereço eletrônico da Crônica ou use o nosso formulário eletrônico de comentário. Faça o favor de nos informar se podemos reproduzir os seus comentários, e, em caso positivo, se podemos incluir o seu nome ou se deseja continuar anônimo. IMPORTANTE: Mesmo se você nos deu este tipo de retorno antes, seria útil termos o seu retorno atualizado agora também - precisamos saber o que você acha!

Mais uma vez, por favor, ajude a manter a Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas viva nesta época importante! Clique aqui para fazer uma doação eletrônica ou envie o seu cheque ou ordem de pagamento a: P.O. Box 18402, Washington, DC, 20036. Faça a sua doação a nome da Fundação DRCNet para fazer uma doação dedutível do imposto de renda à Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas - lembre-se se escolher um dos nossos prêmios gratuitos que reduzirão a parte da sua doação que é dedutível de impostos - ou faça uma doação não-dedutível ao nosso trabalho de lobby - pela Internet ou através de chegue pagável à Rede Coordenadora da Reforma das Políticas de Drogas no mesmo endereço. Também aceitamos contribuições em ações - mande um e-mail a borden@drcnet.org para as informações necessárias.

Anúncio: Agora os feeds de agregação de conteúdo da DRCNet estão disponíveis para a SUA página!

Você é fã da DRCNet e tem uma página que gostaria de usar para difundir a mensagem com mais força do que um único link ao nosso sítio pode conseguir? Temos o prazer de anunciar que os feeds de agregação de conteúdo da DRCNet estão disponíveis. Tanto se o interesse dos seus leitores está na reportagem investigativa quanto na Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas, o comentário corrente nos nossos blogs, a informação sobre subtópicos específicos da guerra às drogas, agora podemos dar-lhes códigos personalizáveis para que você os ponha nos lugares adequados no seu blog ou página e atualizem automaticamente os links ao conteúdo de conscientização da DRCNet.

Por exemplo, se você for um grande fã da Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas e acha que os seus leitores tirariam benefícios dela, pode ter as manchetes da última edição, ou uma porção delas, aparecendo e atualizando-se automaticamente quando sair cada nova edição.

Se a sua página é dedicada às políticas de maconha, pode publicar o nosso arquivo temático, com links a todos os artigos que publicamos na nossa página acerca da maconha – os artigos da Crônica, as publicações nos blogs, a lista de eventos, links a notícias externas e mais. O mesmo vale para a redução de danos, o seqüestro de bens, a violência do narcotráfico, os programas de troca de seringas, o Canadá, as iniciativas eleitorais, quase cem tópicos diferentes que rastreamos correntemente. (Visite o portal da Crônica, na coluna direita, para ver a lista atual completa.)

Se você gosta especialmente da nossa nova seção do Bar Clandestino, há conteúdo novo todos os dias lidando com todas as questões e você pode colocar links a essas publicações ou a subseções do Bar Clandestino.

Clique aqui para ver uma amostra do que está disponível - por favor, note que a extensão, a aparência e demais detalhes de como isso aparecerá na sua página podem ser personalizados para se adequarem às suas necessidades e preferências.

Por favor, saiba também que ficaremos felizes em fazer-lhe mais permutas do nosso conteúdo disponível sob pedido (apesar de não podermos prometer o cumprimento imediato de tais solicitações já que, em muitos casos, a oportunidade dependerá da disponibilidade do nosso web designer). Visite o nosso Mapa do Sítio para ver o que está disponível atualmente – qualquer feed RSS disponível ali também está disponível como feed de javascript para a sua página (junto com o feed da Crônica que não aparece ainda, mas que você já pode encontrar na página de feeds relacionada acima). Experimente o nosso gerador automático de feeds aqui.

Entre em contato conosco se quiser assistência ou informe-nos sobre o que está relacionando e aonde. E obrigado de antemão pelo seu apoio.

Anúncio: Os feeds RSS da DRCNet estão disponíveis

Os feeds RSS são uma onda do futuro – e a DRCNet os oferece agora! A última edição da Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas está disponível usando RSS em http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/feed.

Temos muitos outros feeds RSS disponíveis também, sobre cerca de cem subtópicos diferentes das políticas de drogas que começamos a rastrear desde o relançamento da nossa página neste verão – relacionando não somente os artigos da Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas, mas também as publicações no Bar Clandestino, as listas de eventos, os links a notícias externas e mais – e para as nossas publicações diárias nos blogs e em seus diferentes subendereços. Visite o nosso Mapa do Sítio para ler a série completa.

Obrigado por se sintonizar na DRCNet e na reforma das políticas de drogas!

Anúncio: Novo formato para o Calendário do Reformador

http://stopthedrugwar.org/files/appointmentbook.jpg
Com o lançamento da nossa nova página, O Calendário do Reformador não aparecerá mais como parte do boletim Crônica da Guerra Contra as Drogas, mas será mantido como seção de nossa nova página:

O Calendário do Reformador publica eventos grandes e pequenos de interesse para os reformadores das políticas de drogas ao redor do mundo. Seja uma grande conferência internacional, uma manifestação que reúna pessoas de toda a região ou um fórum na universidade local, queremos saber para que possamos informar os demais também.

Porém, precisamos da sua ajuda para mantermos o calendário atualizado, então, por favor, entre em contato conosco e não suponha que já estamos informados sobre o evento ou que vamos saber dele por outra pessoa, porque isso nem sempre acontece.

Desejamos informá-lo de mais matérias novas de nossa nova página assim que estiverem disponíveis.

Imposição da lei: As estórias de policiais corruptos desta semana

Um agente do Michigan é acusado de desaparecer com um montão de cocaína, um fiscal da liberdade assistida juvenil do Alabama é acusado de informar os bandidos, um policial estadual do Massachusetts aceita um acordo em um esquema de tráfico de analgésicos e um policial do Missouri é preso por roubar entregadores de drogas. Vamos ao que interessa:

Em Detroit, um agente de repressão aos entorpecentes de Detroit foi suspenso no dia 19 de julho por supostamente roubar seis quilogramas de cocaína pura do armazém de provas da delegacia A chefa de polícia de Detroit, Ella Bully-Cummings, não identificou o oficial, dizendo que ele ainda não fora acusado criminalmente, mas ela disse sim que ele teve acesso ao armazém de provas e era suspeito de substituir a cocaína por outra substância. A droga roubada estava estimada em $2.4 milhões, acrescentou.

Em Worcester, Massachusetts, um policial estadual se confessou culpado no dia 19 de julho de acusações relacionadas ao seu papel em um esquema de distribuição de Oxycontin. O policial Mark Lemieux, 49, um ex-membro da Força-Tarefa Antidrogas da Promotoria da Comarca de Bristol, é acusado de formar quadrilha com o ex-parceiro dele na polícia estadual, a namorada co-habitante dele e um pistoleiro contratado para distribuir o popular analgésico de junho de 2006 a maio de 2007. Ele integrou a força-tarefa de 2002 até dezembro de 2006. Lemieux e companhia caíram depois que um fornecedor que contatara foi preso e concordou em colocar uma escuta. Os documentos de acusação dizem que a polícia fez com que Lemieux recolhesse duas vezes dinheiro de traficantes enquanto vestia uniforme e dirigia uma viatura sem placa.

Em São Luiz, um ex-sargento da polícia da área suburbana de São Luiz pegou quatro anos de prisão federal no dia 20 de julho pelo papel dele em uma formação de quadrilha para traficar cocaína O ex-sargento de Hillsdale, Christopher Cornell, 45, foi indiciado junto com cinco outros homens da área de São Luiz no que os promotores chamaram de uma formação de quadrilha para distribuir cocaína por toda a área metropolitana. Os membros do grupo confessaram tramar o roubo de entregadores de drogas ao fazerem com que os carregamentos passassem por Hillsdale, onde Cornell os pararia e ficaria com as drogas deles. Ele aceitou ser acusado de uso de um aparelho de comunicação para facilitar um crime.

Justiça penal: Líderes do Partido Verde pedem reformas radicais

Embora, em geral, os republicanos sigam a linha-dura "severa com a criminalidade" que tem lhes servido tão bem durante décadas e os democratas nem sequer se importem em votar contra os reides da DEA contra os fornecedores de maconha medicinal, o Partido Verde dos EUA está pedindo reformas radicais no sistema de justiça penal para reduzir a velocidade do rolo compressor do encarceramento em massa e desfazer os preconceitos contra negros, hispânicos e os pobres.

http://stopthedrugwar.com/files/cliffthorntoncampaigning.jpg
Cliff Thornton em campanha
Nesta semana, líderes verdes chamaram o status dos EUA como líder no encarceramento - tanto em porcentagem quanto em números reais - de uma "vergonha para os Estados Unidos" e expressaram alarme com o preconceito racial sistemático no sistema de justiça penal estadunidense. Embora usassem o caso dos "Seis de Jena" - seis estudantes negros do segundo grau de Jena, na Luisiana, acusados agora de tentativa de assassinato por uma briga escolar na qual nenhum estudante branco foi acusado - como deixa, os verdes lidaram rapidamente com as questões gerais da eqüidade na justiça penal e da guerra às drogas.

"O caso dos Seis de Jena simboliza como as pessoas de cor nos EUA enfrentam o processo e a condenação", disse Clifford Thornton, candidato verde ao governo do Connecticut em 2006 e co-fundador do grupo de reforma das políticas de drogas Efficacy. "O processo dos Seis de Jena é um dos exemplos mais descarados e escandalosos de como o nosso sistema de justiça criminaliza regularmente negros e morenos - especialmente as crianças".

Os verdes também citaram um estudo recente do Sentencing Project que descobriu diversas disparidades raciais e étnicas na maneira pela qual as pessoas são tratadas pelo sistema de justiça penal. O relatório descobriu que os negros são presos cinco vezes mais do que os brancos e que os hispânicos são presos quase duas vezes mais do que os brancos.

Líderes verdes listaram diversas medidas urgentes para revisar o sistema de justiça:

  • Monitoramento federal de práticas processuais e padrões de condenação em todas as jurisdições em que tais disparidades são evidentes, conforme as leis de direitos civis;
  • Cancelamento da guerra contra as drogas, que os verdes chamaram de "uma guerra contra os jovens e as pessoas de cor". O partido aponta que: "De acordo com a DEA, o FBI, o Ministério da Justiça, as agências policiais e numerosos grupos e pesquisadores de interesse público, 72% de todos os usuários de drogas ilegais e a maioria dos envolvidos no tráfico de drogas são brancos, enquanto que os afro-americanos são só 13% de todos os consumidores de drogas ilegais e uma porcentagem diminuta dos importadores de drogas. Apesar destes dados, a porcentagem esmagadora dos presos por drogas é negra";
  • Abolição da pena de morte;
  • Revogação dos estatutos de tolerância zero e de condenação obrigatória, que engrandecem o poder dos promotores e desgastam a discrição judicial;
  • Um fim aos abusos do sistema de acordos de confissão de culpabilidade, que resultaram na prisão de inocentes que não têm os recursos financeiros para se defenderem suficientemente na Justiça;
  • Um fim à privatização do sistema prisional, que cria incentivos econômicos para botar mais pessoas atrás das grades, já que os donos e contratistas empresariais de prisões aumentam os lucros deles quando mais celas são ocupadas. Os verdes relacionaram as prisões privatizadas com as duras leis contra as drogas, a objetivação dos pobres e das pessoas de cor para processo criminal, condenação obrigatória e severa, altos índices de pena de morte em alguns estados e demais políticas.

O seu partido tem estes pontos no programa dele? Por quê não?

Semanal: Blogando no Bar Clandestino

Junto com a nossa reportagem investigativa da Crônica, desde o verão passado a DRCNet também esteve proporcionando conteúdo diário na forma de blogagem no Bar Clandestino Stop the Drug War, assim como links às Últimas Notícias (canto inferior esquerdo) e mais informações. Cheque a DRCNet todos os dias para ficar a par da reforma das políticas de drogas!

http://stopthedrugwar.com/files/flapper1-arbizu.jpg
foto de bar clandestino, com as raparigas (por cortesia de arbizu.org)

Nesta semana:

Scott Morgan nos brinda com "ONDCP's 'Cocaine Shortage' Announcement is Pure Fiction" [Anúncio de “falta de cocaína” do ONDCP é pura ficção], "Rumors of a DEA Blog Prompt Curiosity & Concern" [Os rumores de um blog da DEA instigam curiosidade e preocupação] e "Even Anti-Meth Activists Oppose the Drug War" [Até os ativistas antimetanfetamina se opõem à guerra às drogas].

David Borden faz uma análise da votação na maconha medicinal da quarta-feira à noite e imprime uma "Letter from a Would-Be Medical Marijuana Patient" [Carta de um paciente de maconha medicinal em potencial].

David Guard também esteve ocupado publicando uma pletora de notas à imprensa, alertas, listas de empregos e outros artigos interessantes republicados de muitas organizações aliadas ao redor do mundo em nosso feed ativista "In the Trenches".

Una-se aos nossos Blogs do Leitor aqui

Obrigado por ler, e escrever...

Primeira Emenda: Federais assustados indiciam casal por publicar panfletos que identificam dedo-duro

Na terça-feira, um júri federal na Filadélfia indicou duas pessoas, um traficante de drogas acusado e a namorada dele, por distribuírem panfletos que identificavam um informante confidencial em caso federal de crime de drogas dele como dedo-duro. Nenhuma lei protege informantes contra terem as suas identidades publicadas, mas os procuradores federais fizeram pressão - e conseguiram - um indiciamento neste caso por acusações de intimidação de testemunhas e formação de quadrilha.

A informação nos panfletos veio da página Who's A Rat?, que lista informações sobre mais de 4.300 informantes e 400 policiais disfarçados. O procurador federal Patrick Meehan chamou a página de "o novo inimigo" da lei e de seus dedos-duros.

"É um subproduto da cultura de parar de dedurar que todos nós deveríamos achar profundamente perturbadora", disse Meehan em entrevista coletiva e "tem o potencial de comprometer inúmeros processos pelo país afora".

Meehan reconheceu que a página está protegida pela Primeira Emenda, mas decidiu indiciar o casal mesmo assim por tentar intimidar as testemunhas.

Os dois são Joseph Davis, que atualmente cumpre uma sentença de 17 anos por tráfico de PCP, graças em parte ao informante visado nos panfletos, e a namorada dele, Adero Miwo, 24. Davis e o informante foram ambos indiciados no caso sobre o PCP e o informante, conhecido como "D.S.", passou a depor contra o réu, isto é, Davis.

Supostamente, Davis e Miwo distribuíram então panfletos que identificavam D.S. como dedo-duro em pára-brisas, postes e caixas de correio na zona leste da Filadélfia em que ele morava. Com base em informações publicadas em Who's A Rat, o casal produziu volantes que o acusavam de delatar e mostravam a foto dele, junto com o seguinte comentário: "Este cara é um pinguço, um maconheiro e um ladrão de automóveis conhecido entre os seus pares. Quem deveria ser tirado das ruas é ele", de acordo com documentos judiciais.

Davis, que já está atrás das grades, pode pegar mais de 10 anos de prisão, enquanto que Miwo pode pegar até três anos.

As autoridades da lei pelos EUA afora têm-se queixado energicamente que o movimento "parem de dedurar" que se espalhou ao redor do país está impedindo-os de solucionar os crimes. Who's A Rat não está ajudando, reclamam.

Tais páginas mostram uma "profunda falta de respeito" pelo sistema legal, queixou-se JP Weis, diretor do escritório do FBI na Filadélfia. "A mensagem distorcida" nas ruas da cidade, disse "é a de que, de alguma maneira, dar informações sobre um crime é pior do que cometer um crime mesmo". Weis disse que isso é "perturbador".

Nem Weis nem Meehan lidaram com o porquê da "profunda falta de respeito" pelo sistema legal ou o que a guerra às drogas, grande parte da qual se funda em coagir as pessoas a virarem informantes, tem a ver com o problema.

O porta-voz da Who's A Rat, Chris Brown, disse ao Philadelphia Inquirer que a página publica informações públicas enviadas por terceiros e que está protegida pela Primeira Emenda. Brown disse que "não consegue acreditar que alguém tenha sido indiciado por colar um panfleto" e que tal publicidade só "torna a página muito mais popular".

Tributo: A ativista antiguerra às drogas de São Francisco, Virginia Resner

A antiga ativista das políticas de drogas, da maconha medicinal e dos direitos humanos de São Francisco, Virginia Resner, faleceu no dia 18 de julho na cidade-natal dela depois de uma longa luta contra o câncer de mama. Tinha 60 anos de idade.

http://stopthedrugwar.com/files/randallawardwinners.jpg
Virginia Resner (a segunda da esquerda) recebendo o Prêmio Randall, com Nora Callahan, Randy Credico, Mikki Norris e Chris Conrad (por cortesia de hr95.org)
Filha de um advogado trabalhista, a quem ela dava crédito por inspirar o ativismo e a devoção à justiça dela, Resner se uniu à causa da reforma das políticas de drogas no início dos anos 1990 após ficar exposta diretamente aos seus estragos. Um dia em 1991, Resner voltou para casa vinda do trabalho para encontrar agentes federais revistando o lar dela em busca de provas para usar contra o seu companheiro, Steven Faulkner, que estivera envolvido em um plano para vender drogas. Faulkner acabou com uma sentença mínima obrigatória de cinco anos de prisão como infrator primário e não-violento da legislação antidrogas e a carreira de Resner como ativista estava em andamento.

Atormentada com a condição das mulheres e das famílias desfeitas pelas práticas rigorosas da guerra às drogas, Resner virou a diretora estadual da Califórnia da Families Against Mandatory Minimums. Nesse cargo, ela desempenhou um papel fundamental no esforço para obter a clemência presidencial para Amy Pofahl, que cumprira nove anos de uma sentença de 24 por um crime de tráfico de drogas. O presidente Bill Clinton concedeu a clemência a Pofahl em 2000.

Resner também se uniu aos ativistas pró-maconha do Leste da Baía de São Francisco, Mikki Norris e Chris Conrad, em criar a exposição itinerante "Os direitos humanos e a guerra às drogas", que contava com fotos de vários presos da guerra às drogas, das famílias deles e informação sobre os seus casos. Por fim, esse trabalho produziu um livro, escrito conjuntamente por Resner, Norris e Conrad, "Shattered Lives: Portraits from America's Drug War" [Vidas despedaçadas: Retratos da guerra às drogas dos Estados Unidos].

Resner recebeu o Prêmio Robert C. Randall por Realização no Campo da Ação Cidadã em 2001 da Drug Policy Alliance pelos trabalhos dela no livro.

Ultimamente, Resner foi a presidenta do Green Aid: The Medical Marijuana Legal Defense and Education Fund, em que ela esteve envolvida intimamente nas lutas legais do "Guru da Ganja" Ed Rosenthal. Apesar das lutas dela contra o câncer, ela conseguiu comparecer às audiências dele e lidar com os artigos administrativos para a sua defesa.

Sentiremos saudades dela.

Análise: Quem votou a favor da maconha medicinal desta vez? Detalhamento por voto, partido e mudanças em relação a 2006

(Além da informação que publicamos na quarta-feira à noite no blog do Bar Clandestino, identificamos agora que os membros que não votaram na Hinchey no ano passado são recém-eleitos, ao contrário dos que simplesmente não votaram nela.)

Saíram os resultados sobre a Hinchey, que perdeu por 165 a 262. É só uma ligeira melhora em relação ao ano passado, quando perdemos por 163-259. Eis aqui um sumário das principais estatísticas:

  • 165 congressistas votaram a favor da emenda Hinchey sobre a maconha medicinal neste ano (150 deles democratas), mas 262 congressistas votaram contra. Dez congressistas não tinham votos registrados (mais Pelosi, por algum motivo técnico como Presidenta).
  • 78 democratas votaram contra a emenda, enquanto que 15 republicanos votaram a favor;
  • Nove congressistas que votaram Sim na emenda no ano passado mudaram os votos deles para Não desta vez (vaias) e três que votaram Não no ano passado mudaram para Sim;
  • 27 congressistas que ou foram recém-eleitos ou não tinham um voto registrado a respeito da emenda Hinchey no ano passado votaram Sim, só um deles era republicano;
  • 45 congressistas que ou foram recém-eleitos ou não votaram na emenda no ano passado votaram Não, inclusive 24 democratas e 21 republicanos;
  • Dois congressistas que votaram Sim no ano passado não votaram na emenda neste ano e sete congressistas que votaram Não no ano passado também não votaram neste ano.

A seguinte é uma compilação detalha que cobre todas as estatísticas listadas acima:

165 congressistas votaram a favor da emenda Hinchey sobre a maconha medicinal neste ano:

Abercrombie (D-HI)
Ackerman (D-NY)
Allen (D-ME)
Andrews (D-NJ)
Baird (D-WA)
Baldwin (D-WI)
Bartlett (R-MD)
Becerra (D-CA)
Berkley (D-NV)
Berman (D-CA)
Bishop (D-GA)
Bishop (D-NY)
Blumenauer (D-OR)
Brady (D-PA)
Broun (R-GA)
Campbell (R-CA)
Capps (D-CA)
Capuano (D-MA)
Carnahan (D-MO)
Carson (D-IN)
Christensen (D-VI)
Clay (D-MO)
Cleaver (D-MO)
Cohen (D-TN)
Conyers (D-MI)
Courtney (D-CT)
Crowley (D-NY)
Davis (D-CA)
Davis (D-IL)
DeFazio (D-OR)
DeGette (D-CO)
Delahunt (D-MA)
DeLauro (D-CT)
Doggett (D-TX)
Doyle (D-PA)
Ellison (D-MN)
Emanuel (D-IL)
Engel (D-NY)
Eshoo (D-CA)
Farr (D-CA)
Fattah (D-PA)
Filner (D-CA)
Flake (R-AZ)
Frank (D-MA)
Garrett (R-NJ)
Giffords (D-AZ)
Gilchrest (R-MD)
Gonzalez (D-TX)
Green, Al (D-TX)
Grijalva (D-AZ)
Gutierrez (D-IL)
Hare (D-IL)
Harman (D-CA)
Hastings (D-FL)
Higgins (D-NY)
Hinchey (D-NY)
Hirono (D-HI)
Hodes (D-NH)
Holt (D-NJ)
Honda (D-CA)
Hooley (D-OR)
Hoyer (D-MD)
Inslee (D-WA)
Israel (D-NY)
Jackson (D-IL)
Jackson-Lee (D-TX)
Johnson (D-GA)
Johnson (R-IL)
Johnson, E. B. (D-TX)
Jones (D-OH)
Kanjorski (D-PA)
Kaptur (D-OH)
Kennedy (D-RI)
Kildee (D-MI)
Kilpatrick (D-MI)
Kind (D-WI)
Kucinich (D-OH)
Langevin (D-RI)
Lantos (D-CA)
Larson (D-CT)
LaTourette (R-OH)
Lee (D-CA)
Lewis (D-GA)
Loebsack (D-IA)
Lofgren (D-CA)
Lowey (D-NY)
Maloney (D-NY)
Markey (D-MA)
Matsui (D-CA)
McCarthy (D-NY)
McCollum (D-MN)
McDermott (D-WA)
McGovern (D-MA)
McNulty (D-NY)
Melancon (D-LA)
Miller, George (D-CA)
Mitchell (D-AZ)
Moore (D-KS)
Moore (D-WI)
Moran (D-VA)
Murphy (D-CT)
Murtha (D-PA)
Nadler (D-NY)
Napolitano (D-CA)
Neal (D-MA)
Norton (D-DC)
Oberstar (D-MN)
Obey (D-WI)
Olver (D-MA)
Pallone (D-NJ)
Pascrell (D-NJ)
Pastor (D-AZ)
Paul (R-TX)
Payne (D-NJ)
Perlmutter (D-CO)
Peterson (D-MN)
Porter (R-NV)
Price (D-NC)
Rangel (D-NY)
Rehberg (R-MT)
Renzi (R-AZ)
Rodriguez (D-TX)
Rohrabacher (R-CA)
Rothman (D-NJ)
Roybal-Allard (D-CA)
Royce (R-CA)
Ruppersberger (D-MD)
Rush (D-IL)
Ryan (D-OH)
Sanchez, Linda T. (D-CA)
Sanchez, Loretta (D-CA)
Sarbanes (D-MD)
Schakowsky (D-IL)
Schiff (D-CA)
Scott (D-GA)
Scott (D-VA)
Serrano (D-NY)
Sestak (D-PA)
Shea-Porter (D-NH)
Sherman (D-CA)
Sires (D-NJ)
Slaughter (D-NY)
Solis (D-CA)
Sutton (D-OH)
Tancredo (R-CO)
Tauscher (D-CA)
Thompson (D-CA)
Tierney (D-MA)
Towns (D-NY)
Udall (D-CO)
Udall (D-NM)
Van Hollen (D-MD)
Velazquez (D-NY)
Walz (D-MN)
Waters (D-CA)
Watson (D-CA)
Watt (D-NC)
Waxman (D-CA)
Weiner (D-NY)
Welch (D-VT)
Wexler (D-FL)
Woolsey (D-CA)
Wu (D-OR)
Wynn (D-MD)
Yarmuth (D-KY)

... mas 262 congressistas votaram contra ela.

Aderholt (R-AL)
Akin (R-MO)
Alexander (R-LA)
Altmire (D-PA)
Arcuri (D-NY)
Baca (D-CA)
Bachmann (R-MN)
Baker (R-LA)
Barrett (R-SC)
Barrow (D-GA)
Barton (R-TX)
Bean (D-IL)
Berry (D-AR)
Biggert (R-IL)
Bilbray (R-CA)
Bilirakis (R-FL)
Bishop (R-UT)
Blackburn (R-TN)
Blunt (R-MO)
Boehner (R-OH)
Bonner (R-AL)
Bono (R-CA)
Boozman (R-AR)
Boren (D-OK)
Boswell (D-IA)
Boustany (R-LA)
Boyd (D-FL)
Boyda (D-KS)
Bradley (R-NH)
Brady (R-TX)
Braley (D-IA)
Brown (D-FL)
Brown (R-SC)
Brown-Waite, Ginny (R-FL)
Buchanan (R-FL)
Burgess (R-TX)
Burton (R-IN)
Butterfield (D-NC)
Buyer (R-IN)
Calvert (R-CA)
Camp (R-MI)
Cannon (R-UT)
Cantor (R-VA)
Capito (R-WV)
Cardoza (D-CA)
Carney (D-PA)
Carter (R-TX)
Castle (R-DE)
Castor (D-FL)
Chabot (R-OH)
Chandler (D-KY)
Clyburn (D-SC)
Coble (R-NC)
Cole (R-OK)
Conaway (R-TX)
Cooper (D-TN)
Costa (D-CA)
Costello (D-IL)
Cramer (D-AL)
Crenshaw (R-FL)
Cuellar (D-TX)
Culberson (R-TX)
Cummings (D-MD)
Davis (D-AL)
Davis (D-TN)
Davis (R-KY)
Davis, David (R-TN)
Davis, Tom (R-VA)
Deal (R-GA)
Dent (R-PA)
Diaz-Balart, L. (R-FL)
Diaz-Balart, M. (R-FL)
Dicks (D-WA)
Dingell (D-MI)
Donnelly (D-IN)
Doolittle (R-CA)
Drake (R-VA)
Dreier (R-CA)
Duncan (R-TN)
Edwards (D-TX)
Ehlers (R-MI)
Ellsworth (D-IN)
Emerson (R-MO)
English (R-PA)
Etheridge (D-NC)
Everett (R-AL)
Faleomavaega (D-AS)
Fallin (R-OK)
Feeney (R-FL)
Ferguson (R-NJ)
Forbes (R-VA)
Fortenberry (R-NE)
Fortuno (R-PR)
Fossella (R-NY)
Foxx (R-NC)
Franks (R-AZ)
Frelinghuysen (R-NJ)
Gallegly (R-CA)
Gerlach (R-PA)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Gillmor (R-OH)
Gingrey (R-GA)
Gohmert (R-TX)
Goode (R-VA)
Goodlatte (R-VA)
Gordon (D-TN)
Granger (R-TX)
Graves (R-MO)
Green, Gene (D-TX)
Hall (D-NY)
Hall (R-TX)
Hastert (R-IL)
Hastings (R-WA)
Hayes (R-NC)
Heller (R-NV)
Hensarling (R-TX)
Herger (R-CA)
Herseth (D-SD)
Hill (D-IN)
Hinojosa (D-TX)
Hobson (R-OH)
Hoekstra (R-MI)
Holden (D-PA)
Hulshof (R-MO)
Hunter (R-CA)
Inglis (R-SC)
Issa (R-CA)
Jefferson (D-LA)
Jindal (R-LA)
Johnson, Sam (R-TX)
Jones (R-NC)
Jordan (R-OH)
Kagen (D-WI)
Keller (R-FL)
King (R-IA)
King (R-NY)
Kingston (R-GA)
Kirk (R-IL)
Klein (D-FL)
Kline (R-MN)
Knollenberg (R-MI)
Kuhl (R-NY)
Lamborn (R-CO)
Lampson (D-TX)
Larsen (D-WA)
Latham (R-IA)
Levin (D-MI)
Lewis (R-CA)
Lewis (R-KY)
Linder (R-GA)
Lipinski (D-IL)
LoBiondo (R-NJ)
Lucas (R-OK)
Lungren (R-CA)
Lynch (D-MA)
Mack (R-FL)
Mahoney (D-FL)
Manzullo (R-IL)
Marchant (R-TX)
Matheson (D-UT)
McCarthy (R-CA)
McCaul (R-TX)
McCotter (R-MI)
McCrery (R-LA)
McHenry (R-NC)
McHugh (R-NY)
McIntyre (D-NC)
McKeon (R-CA)
McMorris (R-WA)
McNerney (D-CA)
Meek (D-FL)
Meeks (D-NY)
Mica (R-FL)
Miller (D-NC)
Miller (R-FL)
Miller (R-MI)
Miller, Gary (R-CA)
Mollohan (D-WV)
Moran (R-KS)
Murphy (R-PA)
Murphy, Patrick (D-PA)
Musgrave (R-CO)
Myrick (R-NC)
Neugebauer (R-TX)
Nunes (R-CA)
Ortiz (D-TX)
Pearce (R-NM)
Pence (R-IN)
Peterson (R-PA)
Petri (R-WI)
Pickering (R-MS)
Pitts (R-PA)
Platts (R-PA)
Poe (R-TX)
Pomeroy (D-ND)
Price (R-GA)
Pryce (R-OH)
Putnam (R-FL)
Radanovich (R-CA)
Rahall (D-WV)
Ramstad (R-MN)
Regula (R-OH)
Reichert (R-WA)
Reyes (D-TX)
Reynolds (R-NY)
Rogers (R-AL)
Rogers (R-KY)
Rogers (R-MI)
Roskam (R-IL)
Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL)
Ross (D-AR)
Ryan (R-WI)
Salazar (D-CO)
Sali (R-ID)
Saxton (R-NJ)
Schmidt (R-OH)
Schwartz (D-PA)
Sensenbrenner (R-WI)
Sessions (R-TX)
Shadegg (R-AZ)
Shays (R-CT)
Shimkus (R-IL)
Shuler (D-NC)
Shuster (R-PA)
Simpson (R-ID)
Skelton (D-MO)
Smith (D-WA)
Smith (R-NE)
Smith (R-NJ)
Smith (R-TX)
Snyder (D-AR)
Souder (R-IN)
Space (D-OH)
Spratt (D-SC)
Stearns (R-FL)
Stupak (D-MI)
Sullivan (R-OK)
Tanner (D-TN)
Taylor (D-MS)
Terry (R-NE)
Thompson (D-MS)
Thornberry (R-TX)
Tiahrt (R-KS)
Tiberi (R-OH)
Turner (R-OH)
Upton (R-MI)
Visclosky (D-IN)
Walberg (R-MI)
Walden (R-OR)
Walsh (R-NY)
Wamp (R-TN)
Wasserman Schultz (D-FL)
Weldon (R-FL)
Weller (R-IL)
Westmoreland (R-GA)
Whitfield (R-KY)
Wicker (R-MS)
Wilson (D-OH)
Wilson (R-NM)
Wilson (R-SC)
Wolf (R-VA)
Young (R-FL)

10 congressistas não tinham votos registrados (mais Pelosi, por algum motivo técnico como Presidenta):

Bachus (R-AL)
Boucher (D-VA)
Clarke (D-NY)
Cubin (R-WY)
Davis, Jo Ann (R-VA)
LaHood (R-IL)
Marshall (D-GA)
Michaud (D-ME)
Stark (D-CA)
Young (R-AK)

78 democratas votaram contra a emenda:

Altmire (D-PA)
Arcuri (D-NY)
Baca (D-CA)
Barrow (D-GA)
Bean (D-IL)
Berry (D-AR)
Boren (D-OK)
Boswell (D-IA)
Boyd (D-FL)
Boyda (D-KS)
Braley (D-IA)
Brown (D-FL)
Butterfield (D-NC)
Cardoza (D-CA)
Carney (D-PA)
Castor (D-FL)
Chandler (D-KY)
Clyburn (D-SC)
Cooper (D-TN)
Costa (D-CA)
Costello (D-IL)
Cramer (D-AL)
Cuellar (D-TX)
Cummings (D-MD)
Davis (D-AL)
Davis (D-TN)
Dicks (D-WA)
Dingell (D-MI)
Donnelly (D-IN)
Edwards (D-TX)
Ellsworth (D-IN)
Etheridge (D-NC)
Faleomavaega (D-AS)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Gordon (D-TN)
Green, Gene (D-TX)
Hall (D-NY)
Herseth (D-SD)
Hill (D-IN)
Hinojosa (D-TX)
Holden (D-PA)
Jefferson (D-LA)
Kagen (D-WI)
Klein (D-FL)
Lampson (D-TX)
Larsen (D-WA)
Levin (D-MI)
Lipinski (D-IL)
Lynch (D-MA)
Mahoney (D-FL)
Matheson (D-UT)
McIntyre (D-NC)
McNerney (D-CA)
Meek (D-FL)
Meeks (D-NY)
Miller (D-NC)
Mollohan (D-WV)
Murphy, Patrick (D-PA)
Ortiz (D-TX)
Pomeroy (D-ND)
Rahall (D-WV)
Reyes (D-TX)
Ross (D-AR)
Salazar (D-CO)
Schwartz (D-PA)
Shuler (D-NC)
Skelton (D-MO)
Smith (D-WA)
Snyder (D-AR)
Space (D-OH)
Spratt (D-SC)
Stupak (D-MI)
Tanner (D-TN)
Taylor (D-MS)
Thompson (D-MS)
Visclosky (D-IN)
Wasserman Schultz (D-FL)
Wilson (D-OH)

... enquanto que 15 republicanos votaram a favor dela:

Bartlett (R-MD)
Broun (R-GA)
Campbell (R-CA)
Flake (R-AZ)
Garrett (R-NJ)
Gilchrest (R-MD)
Johnson (R-IL)
LaTourette (R-OH)
Paul (R-TX)
Porter (R-NV)
Rehberg (R-MT)
Renzi (R-AZ)
Rohrabacher (R-CA)
Royce (R-CA)
Tancredo (R-CO)

Nove congressistas que votaram Sim na emenda no ano passado mudaram os votos deles para Não desta vez (vaias):

Brown (D-FL)
Burton (R-IN)
Butterfield (D-NC)
Clyburn (D-SC)
Dicks (D-WA)
Jefferson (D-LA)
Meeks (D-NY)
Smith (D-WA)
Thompson (D-MS)

... enquanto que três que Votaram Não no ano passado mudaram para Sim:

Emanuel (D-IL)
Peterson (D-MN)
Renzi (R-AZ)

Há 27 congressistas que ou foram eleitos pela primeira vez ou que não tinham voto registrado a respeito da emenda Hinchey no ano passado os quais votaram Sim, um dos quais era republicano:

(A maioria é de novatos; os diversos marcados com um asterisco foram congressistas da vez passada, mas não votaram na emenda.)

Broun (R-GA)
Christensen (D-VI)*
Cohen (D-TN)
Courtney (D-CT)
Ellison (D-MN)
Giffords (D-AZ)
Gonzalez (D-TX)*
Hare (D-IL)
Hirono (D-HI)
Hodes (D-NH)
Johnson (D-GA)
Kanjorski (D-PA)
Loebsack (D-IA)
Mitchell (D-AZ)
Murphy (D-CT)
Norton (D-DC)*
Perlmutter (D-CO)
Rodriguez (D-TX)
Sarbanes (D-MD)
Schakowsky (D-IL)*
Sestak (D-PA)
Shea-Porter (D-NH)
Sires (D-NJ)
Sutton (D-OH)
Walz (D-MN)
Welch (D-VT)
Yarmuth (D-KY)

45 congressistas que ou foram recém-eleitos ou não votaram na emenda no ano passado votaram Não, inclusive 24 democratas e 21 republicanos:

(A maioria é de novatos; os diversos marcados foram congressistas da vez passada, mas não votaram na emenda.)

Altmire (D-PA)
Arcuri (D-NY)
Bachmann (R-MN)
Bilirakis (R-FL)
Boyda (D-KS)
Braley (D-IA)
Buchanan (R-FL)
Cannon (R-UT)
Carney (D-PA)
Castor (D-FL)
Davis, David (R-TN)
Donnelly (D-IN)
Ellsworth (D-IN)
Faleomavaega (D-AS)*
Fallin (R-OK)
Fortuno (R-PR)*
Gerlach (R-PA)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Hall (D-NY)
Hastert (R-IL)*
Heller (R-NV)
Hill (D-IN)
Holden (D-PA)
Johnson, Sam (R-TX)
Jordan (R-OH)
Kagen (D-WI)
Klein (D-FL)
Lamborn (R-CO)
Lampson (D-TX)
Mahoney (D-FL)
McCarthy (R-CA)
McNerney (D-CA)
Murphy, Patrick (D-PA)
Poe (R-TX)
Roskam (R-IL)
Sali (R-ID)
Shays (R-CT)*
Shuler (D-NC)
Smith (R-NE)
Souder (R-IN)*
Space (D-OH)
Stupak (D-MI)*
Taylor (D-MS)*
Walberg (R-MI)
Wilson (D-OH)

(Sabe-se que pelo menos dois destes, Souder e Hastert, sempre foram opositores enérgicos da maconha medicinal.)

Dois congressistas que votaram Sim no ano passado não votaram na emenda neste ano:

Michaud (D-ME)
Stark (D-CA)

... e sete congressistas que votaram Não no ano passado também não votaram neste ano:

Bachus (R-AL)
Boucher (D-VA)
Cubin (R-WY)
Davis, Jo Ann (R-VA)
LaHood (R-IL)
Marshall (D-GA)
Young (R-AK)

Drug War Issues

Criminal JusticeAsset Forfeiture, Collateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Court Rulings, Drug Courts, Due Process, Felony Disenfranchisement, Incarceration, Policing (2011 Drug War Killings, 2012 Drug War Killings, 2013 Drug War Killings, 2014 Drug War Killings, 2015 Drug War Killings, 2016 Drug War Killings, Arrests, Eradication, Informants, Interdiction, Lowest Priority Policies, Police Corruption, Police Raids, Profiling, Search and Seizure, SWAT/Paramilitarization, Task Forces, Undercover Work), Probation or Parole, Prosecution, Reentry/Rehabilitation, Sentencing (Alternatives to Incarceration, Clemency and Pardon, Crack/Powder Cocaine Disparity, Death Penalty, Decriminalization, Defelonization, Drug Free Zones, Mandatory Minimums, Rockefeller Drug Laws, Sentencing Guidelines)CultureArt, Celebrities, Counter-Culture, Music, Poetry/Literature, Television, TheaterDrug UseParaphernalia, ViolenceIntersecting IssuesCollateral Sanctions (College Aid, Drug Taxes, Housing, Welfare), Violence, Border, Budgets/Taxes/Economics, Business, Civil Rights, Driving, Economics, Education (College Aid), Employment, Environment, Families, Free Speech, Gun Policy, Human Rights, Immigration, Militarization, Money Laundering, Pregnancy, Privacy (Search and Seizure, Drug Testing), Race, Religion, Science, Sports, Women's IssuesMarijuana PolicyGateway Theory, Hemp, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Marijuana Industry, Medical MarijuanaMedicineMedical Marijuana, Science of Drugs, Under-treatment of PainPublic HealthAddiction, Addiction Treatment (Science of Drugs), Drug Education, Drug Prevention, Drug-Related AIDS/HIV or Hepatitis C, Harm Reduction (Methadone & Other Opiate Maintenance, Needle Exchange, Overdose Prevention, Safe Injection Sites)Source and Transit CountriesAndean Drug War, Coca, Hashish, Mexican Drug War, Opium ProductionSpecific DrugsAlcohol, Ayahuasca, Cocaine (Crack Cocaine), Ecstasy, Heroin, Ibogaine, ketamine, Khat, Kratom, Marijuana (Gateway Theory, Marijuana -- Personal Use, Medical Marijuana, Hashish), Methamphetamine, New Synthetic Drugs (Synthetic Cannabinoids, Synthetic Stimulants), Nicotine, Prescription Opiates (Fentanyl, Oxycontin), Psychedelics (LSD, Mescaline, Peyote, Salvia Divinorum)YouthGrade School, Post-Secondary School, Raves, Secondary School